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Genre Discussions > Historical True Crimes

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message 1: by Lauren (new)

Lauren (laurenjberman) | 1634 comments Mod
Do you enjoy reading about crimes that have caught and held the public imagination for decades or even centuries?

This is the place to discuss crimes and books about crimes including Jack the Ripper, H. H. Holmes, Lizzie Borden, Black Dahlia, Leopold and Loeb, etc.


message 2: by Sue (new)

Sue Rice | 1 comments This subject has always fascinated me! On my first trip to London I took the "Jack the Ripper" tour twice, once with Donald Rumbelow, and I've stayed in the "Lizzie Borden Bed & Breakfast". I'd love to exchange ideas and info with like minds! For example, T. E. Huff's Jack the Ripper crime/romance novel, "Nine Buck's Row" is being published on Kindle under his romance pseudonym, Jessica Braithwaite 2/15/15.


message 3: by Lauren (new)

Lauren (laurenjberman) | 1634 comments Mod
Thanks for the info, Sue. I'm a huge Jack the Ripper groupie (can't say fan - that's way too creepy, lol!)


message 5: by Terri (new)

Terri (terrilovescrows) | 26 comments Lauren wrote: "Do you enjoy reading about crimes that have caught and held the public imagination for decades or even centuries?

This is the place to discuss crimes and books about crimes including Jack the Rip..."


All of these are fascinating cases!

Also - the NYC Stamford White Case


message 6: by Lauren (new)

Lauren (laurenjberman) | 1634 comments Mod
Terri wrote: "Also - the NYC Stamford White Case "

Are there any books about it, Terri?


message 8: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca (rebecca487) | 30 comments Defintely; true crime is what got me into historical mysteries. I remember reading Jack the Ripper Mammoth book when I was younger and being completely hooked. The Mammoth Book of Jack the Ripper. Currently I am reading Murder as a Fine Art (Thomas De Quincey, #1) by David Morrell Murder as a Fine Art which deals with the Ratcliffe Highway Murders in England in 1811. Another interesting crime where the identity of the suspect is not 100% solidified.


message 9: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca (rebecca487) | 30 comments Sue wrote: "This subject has always fascinated me! On my first trip to London I took the "Jack the Ripper" tour twice, once with Donald Rumbelow, and I've stayed in the "Lizzie Borden Bed & Breakfast". I'd lov..."

That sounds amazing. If I ever travel to England I will definitely have to take that tour if still offered.


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 462 comments I'm currently reading and enjoying The Invention of Murder: How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime, which covers a lot of 19th century English true crime cases. (As well as how the newspapers covered these stories, which was generally extensively and without too much concern for the facts, and what novelists and playwrights and the popular culture did with the stories afterwards.) I'm near the end and we've covered everything from the Ratcliffe Highway murders through to the Poison Panic of the 1840s and Jack the Ripper.


message 11: by Robert (new)

Robert Tell | 7 comments We always hear a lot about Lizzie Borden, but how many know about the Polly Bodine case in New York City in 1843? She was accused of the axe murder of her sister-in-law and baby niece. It had NYC in an uproar for many years. PT Barnum created a horrible wax statue of a fiendish Polly Bodin dripping blood, called her the "Witch of Staten Island," and stationed it outside the courtroom. Edgar Allen Poe wrote editorial condemning her. She had three trials, was on death row for awhile, and was finally exonerated. The crime was never solved. Google Polly Bodine for more info.

Robert Tell, Author,
The Witch of Maple Park
www.roberttell.com


message 12: by Veronica (new)

Veronica  (readingonthefly) | 691 comments I hadn't heard of that one, Robert. It sounds fascinating.


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