The Next Best Book Club discussion

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Group Read Discussions > The Fault in Our Stars

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message 1: by Lori, Super Mod (new)

Lori (tnbbc) | 10060 comments Mod
Here we go!
It's February group read discussion time.

Jessica hosts once again (she's picking books you all really wanna read, huh?!)

in the meantime:

Who's reading it for the first time?
Who's read it before and is giving it a re-read?
Movie vs. Book?


message 2: by Mary (new)

Mary (mjbookaddict) | 2 comments Jessica, great book choice. Didn't see the movie was I enjoyed the books too much.


message 3: by Kandice (new)

Kandice I loved the book because of my children and then loved the movie too! Funny enough, this is our choice this month at my local library as well.


message 4: by Tiffani (new)

Tiffani (tiffanipassportbooks) | 8 comments Just read the book and watched the movie. I did like the book and will likely read more of John Green's work, but of the two I've read for, The Fault In Our Stars comes in second. The movie was good.


message 5: by Kandice (new)

Kandice Tiffani wrote: "Just read the book and watched the movie. I did like the book and will likely read more of John Green's work, but of the two I've read for, The Fault In Our Stars comes in second. The movie was good."

What is the other Green you've read?


message 6: by Tiffani (new)

Tiffani (tiffanipassportbooks) | 8 comments Kandice wrote: "Tiffani wrote: "Just read the book and watched the movie. I did like the book and will likely read more of John Green's work, but of the two I've read for, The Fault In Our Stars comes in second. ..."
Looking for Alaska.


message 7: by Kandice (new)

Kandice I generally prefer when authors use less description for characters and try to always read before I see, but completely understand the problem you are having Paul! It is hard to see the movie and then recreate different faces as we read.


message 8: by Mohammad (new)

Mohammad (mohammadhishamibrahim) | 2 comments I read the book and watched the movie and I think that the book is sway better.
the movie was a disappointment to me because it left out so many good details and didn't represent the character of Isaac (my favorite character in the book) as it deserves.


message 9: by Tiffani (new)

Tiffani (tiffanipassportbooks) | 8 comments Have you read What We See When We Read? It is all about the way readers picture characters even though by and large authors don't describe characters' physical appearance as much as we think, and how the pictures in our heads tend to be informed by our own experiences.


message 10: by Mohammad (new)

Mohammad (mohammadhishamibrahim) | 2 comments Tiffani wrote: "Have you read What We See When We Read? It is all about the way readers picture characters even though by and large authors don't describe characters' physical appearance as much a..."

sounds interesting but.. 419 pages?? hmmmmmmmm too much maybe


message 11: by Marylee (new)

Marylee MacDonald (marylee_macdonald) | 1 comments I haven't read the book before, nor have I seen the movie, so I'm coming at this with fresh eyes. I've heard good things about the book from other people, and I'm looking forward to judging for myself. Already, this book has prompted an interesting set of comments about description, and I sprang for the book Tiffany mentioned, What We See When We Read. Thanks, Tiffany.


message 12: by David (new)

David (dieseldave) | 1 comments I don't see how a movie version pf "The Fault in Our Stars" could improve on this near-perfect book. See the movie if you want, but reading it will make your life better. And it's quite short. Green gets a lot done in a few pages. And "What We See When We Read" is not a 419 page slog. It's mostly pictures.


message 13: by Diane (new)

Diane | 588 comments David wrote: "I don't see how a movie version pf "The Fault in Our Stars" could improve on this near-perfect book. See the movie if you want, but reading it will make your life better. And it's quite short. Gree..."

Thanks for the info on What We See When We Read - I was a bit put off by the amount of pages for that kind of book. It sounds interesting though so I will check it out.


message 14: by Jessica (new)

Jessica Heffner (jessica617) | 31 comments Hi everyone! Thanks for voting in this book. I do not usually read young adult books but heard this was a must read from a co worker. I read it on a flight to Vegas last year and literally laughed out loud at some parts and cried my eyes out at others. Several times I had to stop reading on the plane so others wouldn't think I was having a breakdown. This book is beautifully written and so captivating. It's theme transcends generations. I have not seen the movie because I cannot imagine it could as good as the book, and I don't want to upset my impressions of the characters. Has anyone read any of John Green's other novels?


message 15: by Kandice (new)

Kandice Jessica wrote: "Hi everyone! Thanks for voting in this book. I do not usually read young adult books but heard this was a must read from a co worker. I read it on a flight to Vegas last year and literally laughed..."

I've read most of them. He does such a great job of capturing the youthful view without sugar coating anything. Kids often see things more realistically than we give them credit for. He shows that perfectly.


message 16: by Tina (new)

Tina | 143 comments Very moving. Was likened to the "Love Story" for this generation.


message 17: by Christine (new)

Christine Pardo | 4 comments Mohammad Hisham Ibrahim wrote: "I read the book and watched the movie and I think that the book is sway better.
the movie was a disappointment to me because it left out so many good details and didn't represent the character of I..."


I feel the same way! Not a horrible movie but not as good as the book. Fast read, cute, and yes some funny parts, which is always welcomed while reading something sad.


message 18: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Dickinson I've been meaning to read this book for a while now and it has been on my Goodreads "to read" list for a few months. I wouldn't let myself watch the movie until I read the book. So, I'm reading the book for the first time and then I'll watch the movie. When I told my friends I was finally going to read the book, all they said was "you'll cry!" Maybe not the best idea to read this book over the next couple of days on the beach??


message 19: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Dickinson I've been meaning to read this book for a while now and it has been on my Goodreads "to read" list for a few months. I wouldn't let myself watch the movie until I read the book. So, I'm reading the book for the first time and then I'll watch the movie. When I told my friends I was finally going to read the book, all they said was "you'll cry!" Maybe not the best idea to read this book over the next couple of days on the beach??


message 20: by Diane (new)

Diane | 588 comments I really enjoyed the book, it was well written and really made you connect with the characters. I started watching the movie but couldn't get into it. It could have been the frame of mind I was in that day (in that case when I try to watch it again my opinion will change) or it could have been the fact that I felt more connected to the characters reading and the book was that much better than the movie. At any rate at some point I will watch the move and decide.


message 21: by Noorilhuda (new)

Noorilhuda | 31 comments Book - very good
Movie - very good.


message 22: by Brenda (new)

Brenda Zimmerman | 3 comments This was the first John Green book that I read. I thought it was well written. I couldn't put it down. The movie was decent but I always prefer the book. I have read a few other John Green books, this one in my mind is the best of his work.


message 23: by Jessica (new)

Jessica Heffner (jessica617) | 31 comments I would not recommend reading this on the beach but you should read it and if the beach is where you'll be, don't miss out on the opportunity to experience this story. I started rereading the book last night and was quickly reminded of how smart and real the writing is; a previous post hit the nail on the head by stating Green captures youth culture without the usual sugar coating we see in so many other young adult novels. Love love love this story. I want to read more of Green's novels but I fear I've read the best book first and the rest may not live up to The Fault in Our Stars.


message 24: by [deleted user] (new)

I read this one last year, and enjoyed it. I didn't get all mushy as I was warned, but I have a feeling that if I saw the movie, I would totally get teary. I found the book a little bit too predictable, but didn't want it to end anyway.


message 25: by Kristen (new)

Kristen (kristenflute) | 4 comments I most likely won't see the movie. I like the Hazel and Gus my mind has created. While I wasn't completely in love with the story, I enjoyed it and look forward to discussing it.


message 26: by Kandice (last edited Feb 07, 2015 06:07PM) (new)

Kandice I have three children, 21, 18 and 16. One of them wears polos all the time. Polo style, I should say, not actual Ralph Lauren polos. The other two wear tees and chucks like you said. I think kids are more comfortable choosing their own style than I was as a kid so there is more diversity.


message 27: by Jody (new)

Jody (josephinegood) | 8 comments I noticed the polo shirts too. When I taught in an Ohio high school in the '80's it was a marker of the "clean cut" kid.


message 28: by Dee (new)

Dee (austhokie) | 616 comments I remember double polo shirts with popped collars being popular in college - does that help?


message 29: by Jessica (new)

Jessica Heffner (jessica617) | 31 comments Thanks for your insight, Paul. Anyone agree with Paul on the issue of character development and depth? Ive had the opposite experience reading this book. Both times. I find that I can relate and empathize with the characters relatively quickly as a result of the writing. Quicker than most books I've read. And, it may be that being "clever" at times helps them cope with their reality. That makes certain aspects of the book even more tragic.


message 30: by Cecile (last edited Feb 11, 2015 11:34PM) (new)

Cecile | 14 comments I'm not altogether certain I liked the book, although it was engaging and held my interest. By "liked" I really mean enjoyed, but then that's most likely the subject matter. However, contrary to Paul's observation, I think the main characters were reasonably well-developed and suspect that what felt like "clever and witty and deep" may relate to the prematurely advanced nature of kids with cancer - especially those who have been dealing with the disease for a number of years. They seemed more like intelligent, philosophical albeit somewhat jaded young adults rather than typical, self-absorbed teens (although there were a couple of those as minor characters.) But then, Green did not present Hazel and Gus at the time of their diagnoses, instead giving us the picture of teens who'd already experienced the stages of grief and while the reader witnesses flashes of anger, both characters were at acceptance. That characterization rang true to me, and I found Hazel and Gus both sympathetic and likable. I was however somewhat disconcerted to Green's revealing the plot twist too soon. It was obvious to me that Gus was headed to an earlier end despite the focus on the precarious nature of Hazel's health emphasized by her stint in the ICU.


message 31: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Dickinson I really enjoyed the book. Friends had warned me that I would cry. And I did shed a few tears. However, the tears weren't so much over the relationship between Hazel and Gus and Hazel coming to terms with his death. The tears for me came between the relationship between Hazel and her Dad. It reminded me so much of the relationship between me and my Dad and me and my Grandfather. My Grandad passed away from a brain tumour almost 4 years ago. At the end of chapter 22, Hazel's dad said about Gus "But it was sure a privilege to love him, huh?" And then he says "Gives you an idea how I feel about you." This touched me so much that I found myself in a puddle of tears because it resonated with me and in the last things my Grandad said to me before he succumbed to the disease. I think that's why I loved this book - because of the text to self connections I made with the content and the characters. Looking forward to reading other John Green works.


message 32: by Jessica (new)

Jessica Heffner (jessica617) | 31 comments Great comment, Melissa. I completely agree about personally connecting to the story. It's a story about coping with loss and enjoying the precious time we have left on this earth. Everyone can relate to that and everyone has lost someone, whether by death or otherwise.


message 33: by Heather L (new)

Heather L  (wordtrix) Cecile wrote: "However, contrary to Paul's observation, I think the main characters were reasonably well-developed and suspect that what felt like "clever and witty and deep" may relate to the prematurely advanced nature of kids with cancer - especially those who have been dealing with the disease for a number of years. . . But then, Green did not present Hazel and Gus at the time of their diagnoses, instead giving us the picture of teens who'd already experienced the stages of grief and while the reader witnesses flashes of anger, both characters were at acceptance. That characterization rang true to me, and I found Hazel and Gus both sympathetic and likable."


I agree with what Cecile says about where the characters are at this point in their life regarding the stages of grief. Both have already been through the different stages of dealing with their cancer and have come to terms with it, even going so far as to buy funeral attire and/or burial plot for the inevitable end. Neither did I feel that they were over-clever or witty, but that they had to grow up faster than most kids their age.

Have not seen the movie, nor have I read other works by this author, though I may do both at some future point.


message 34: by Demetra (new)

Demetra (dedra_de) I thought I had shared on this book! I'm sneaking in!
I loved this book and had some serious ugly cries while reading! While I do agree that you could see the end for Gus coming, I don't think it took away from the enjoyment of the book.
For me, this book impacted me in many ways. Of course it was sad to be in the mindset of a terminally ill kid experiencing love and loss. There was an additional significance for me as a parent. I have a couple littles, and I can't imagine the pain that would come with an incurable diagnosis. I would want to scoop them up and spend every second with them. But the reality is you can't. You have to let them live life for whatever time is left. My heart broke for Hazel's parents and I was hit hard in the feelers thinking of their experience as well.
As for the movie, I don't think I will watch it. I really liked the book and I don't want to change any of the memories I have of it. I can't imagine the movie would be nearly as good as the book.
Great pick, Jessica!


message 35: by Carolyn (new)

Carolyn Taylor-Watts (carolyntaylor-) | 72 comments I was very moved also by this story, upset and very sad long afterward. How richly and beautifully it was told.


message 36: by Carly (new)

Carly Svamvour (faganlady) | 220 comments Well, its like Nicholas Sparks stories - you always know somebody's gonna die 'cause that's the way he writes his stories.

But some stories start out with the reader knowing who's gonna die on the first page - still it hits ya in the gut when it happens.

Love Story ... oh, man - will I ever get over that? Harvey the First and I (my first cat) sitting on the verandah after work, eating shrimp from a can ... I'd started Love Story on my way home from work - knew she was gonna die.

I was finished the book by the end of the night - oh ... had a good cry over that one.

Harvey the First didn't feel a thing. More shrimp, please.


message 37: by Carly (new)

Carly Svamvour (faganlady) | 220 comments BTW - I read first, movie second - that's the only way to do it. If you're gonna watch the movie, consider the story done.

My first experience with that was The Exorcist - I read the book when it appeared in parts in Cosmopolitan in the late 60's? Yeah - I think that was it ... then I saw the movie - that worked for me.

When The Towering Inferno was released, we were asked by the publisher of one the town's newspapers to go to the movie on passes and review it - we went.

Unfortunately, I had intended to read the book - couldn't get past the first page.


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