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Mc week 3

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message 1: by Heather (new)

Heather (heatheramana) | 9 comments Mod
Now that you are three weeks into your multicultural novel you are able to assess what makes this book unique to a particular cultural perspective. Name 2 major things that either surprised, shocked, or enlightened you. Be sure to include specifics. Has this novel altered your perceptions of the culture? Why or why not?


message 2: by 03caleng (new)

03caleng | 20 comments Calen Golden
Mrs. Amantullah
English 2 (H)
2/2/15
In my novel, Dracula, by Bram Stoker parts of the story that the characters are able to accept the fact that vampires exist in their neighborhood. Dr. Van Helsing continuously tried to explain to Dr. Seward that the possibility of the existence of the un-dead was possible. He gives him hard evidence and even shows proof of a known-dead woman who walked from her grave. Thanks to this proof, Dr. Seward was able to understand that this was right in front of him. It definitely helped that the dead woman was a really good friend of his that he had been studying for the past couple of months.
Because the only real culture of Transylvania is represented by an old school vampire with weird habits. From this I can discern a biased opinion of Transylvanians, that are wealthy and have life very good. This is a narrow opinion from only one vague source. The culture of the English or British, however, can be discerned from how the majority of the characters act. All the characters are very kind to each other, and how they talk to each other makes it seem like they aren't able to fully get angry at one another. The British seem like very kind people who are very kind and helpful to each other.


message 3: by 03caleng (new)

03caleng | 20 comments Because the only real culture of Transylvania is represented by an old-school vampire with weird habits, not much can be made of what they are really like.***


message 4: by Ariana (new)

Ariana | 25 comments Ariana Ashufta
2/1/15
E2 Honors
Amanatullah
In my novel The Namesake, the aspect that makes it unique to a cultural perspective is a traditional Bengali mother trying to accept her son’s American ways. Gogol (a.k.a. Nikhil) is surprisingly trying to avoid his culture all that he can, much to his moms dismay. Gogol’s mother is in fact very strict, so it’s a step to accept his American girlfriend; Gogol’s mother seems very in favor of him having an arranged Bengali marriage. Even after being in America as long as they have been, Gogol’s mother Ashima still hasn’t seem to have adapted to a completely different culture. Gogol has long adapted and so has his sister Sonia, who has also moved away. One thing that actually surprised me is how accepting Gogol’s parents where of Maxine. Gogol does caution and warns Maxine, “that they will not be able to touch or kiss each other in front of his parents, that there will be no wine with lunch” (145), as they would be able to in front of her parents. It was quite enlightening to see Maxine so comfortable around his parents even if they had seemed awkward or distant; they still made an effort and even explained, “It’s a pity you can’t stay for dinner…” (149). Another aspect that shocked me is how surprisingly uncomfortable Gogol is around his parents and just Bengali ways in general. Maxine had seemed more comfortable where as Gogol was feeling a relief to, “be back in [Maxine’s] world…” (150). It’s very weird that Gogol tries to avoid all contact with his parents and would rather spend time with Maxine’s parents. It seems as if Gogol is ashamed with his upbringing, having Maxine doesn’t even know his real name. He refuses to tell her even after his father’s lip in saying, “Drive safely, Gogol” (150) Even after Maxine even questions the slip he avoids speaking of it at all costs. This novel hasn’t really altered my perceptions on culture because each culture is going to be different, no one is the same and no one should have to be ashamed of their culture.


message 5: by 03dylanc (new)

03dylanc | 22 comments Dylan Chubon
English 2H
2/1/15
Amanatullah

The master and Margarita is a very interesting book, for actually three major reasons. One, based on the writers biography, Mikhail Bulgakov wrote this book while working in a theater, which no doubt influenced the setting as a major part of plot took place in a theater. So Mikhail Bulgakov has definitely proven to me that a story is influenced by a writer's surroundings. Two, the way characters speak of others include socialist ideas such as "comrade" and "director" of a certain block. However the writing use of these oral titles remind me how for the Russians, this was completely normal. As for a third, the philosophical meaning behind the story shocked me. I did learn that Woland is satan which was surprising but it later reminded me of in the beginning conversation of Jesus' existence. The book literally, from Woland's/Satan's experience, creates a new "Jesus" and how his death really played out. Mikhail showed me how stories can be changed overtime.

Mikhail Bulgakov completely shows me how the Russian culture can be very... Beautiful and exciting. I can't wait to read the rest of the book.


message 6: by 03dylanc (new)

03dylanc | 22 comments Dylan Chubon
English 2H
2/1/15
Amanatullah

The master and Margarita is a very interesting book, for actually three major reasons. One, based on the writers biography, Mikhail Bulgakov wrote this book while working in a theater, which no doubt influenced the setting as a major part of plot took place in a theater. So Mikhail Bulgakov has definitely proven to me that a story is influenced by a writer's surroundings. Two, the way characters speak of others include socialist ideas such as "comrade" and "director" of a certain block. However the writing use of these oral titles remind me how for the Russians, this was completely normal. As for a third, the philosophical meaning behind the story shocked me. I did learn that Woland is satan which was surprising but it later reminded me of in the beginning conversation of Jesus' existence. The book literally, from Woland's/Satan's experience, creates a new "Jesus" and how his death really played out. Mikhail showed me how stories can be changed overtime.

Mikhail Bulgakov completely shows me how the Russian culture can be very... Beautiful and exciting. I can't wait to read the rest of the book.


message 7: by ctrenchard (last edited Feb 01, 2015 08:59PM) (new)

ctrenchard | 20 comments Cadence Trenchard
Amanatullah
English 2H
Period 3
2/1/15

There were several things that surprised and enlightened me in my book, The Namesake, by Jhumpa Lahiri. First of all, I was surprised at how big of a deal birthdays, holidays, weddings, graduations, or any occasion worth celebrating became within the Bengali community. Lahiri always described these major parties in such great detail: noting which families/friends came, which traditional dishes were served, and what all the children were doing. At all the events that are being thrown for Gogol, he seemed to be distant, removed, and disconnected from all the activities. Besides receiving many presents, Gogol appeared to be left out, regardless that he was the reason all his parents' friends and family were celebrating.

Second of all, I learned more about what it was like to be a foreigner living in America, something I have never experienced. I know that I wrote about this in response to last week's prompt, but I really liked what Ashima had to say about how being an immigrant can be compared to being pregnant:

"For being a foreigner, Ashima is beginning to realize, is a sort of lifelong pregnancy--a perpetual wait, a constant burden, a continuous feeling out of sorts. It is an ongoing responsibility, a parenthesis in what had once been an ordinary life, only to discover that the previous life has vanished, replaced by something more complicated and demanding. Like pregnancy, being a foreigner, Ashima believes, is something that elicits the same curiosity from strangers, the same combination of pity and respect" (Lahiri 49).


message 8: by Rania (new)

Rania Belamesh | 5 comments In my novel," Done to the Bone," by Mayra Lazara Dole, Dole shows a very different understanding throughout the novel that really isn't in many books. The cultural aspect of this book is about a Cuban family that discover their daughter is a lesbian. I personally have never seen a book on this subject before which
makes it diverse. Two things that really shocked/surprised me in this book was the mothers behavior, and Maralenas family/ her actions. What really shocked me on the mothers behavior is that even when her daughter begged for her forgiveness she didn't accept it which surprised me because if I were.
her mother then I would automatically accept her to come back.Most Cubans
however are very strict culturally towards teir children's actions so their was no way for Laura to come back unless she wasn't a lesbian anymore. Another thing that really shocked me was Maralena's family getting into a man and then betraying Laura with marrying him. This really shocked me because she apparently didn't love Layra all along basically betraying her after being sent away. . This novel has changed my view on culture in a good way of understanding how di


message 9: by Rania (new)

Rania Belamesh | 5 comments Different other cultures are in treatment. I feel that theirs a reason behind the way cultures affect their people for good or sometimes bad. So in my opinion, this culture particularly makes sense but I feel it to be a little to harsh at times.


message 10: by 03jessical (new)

03jessical | 22 comments Jessica Le
Amanatullah
English 2H
2/1/15

The book, Down to the Bone,by Mayra Lazara Dole is unique to a particular cultural perspective for many reasons, but the main reason that was emphasized was how much "gays, bis, trannies, and genderqueers" aren't accepted in the Cuban culture (188). She makes it especially clear when the main character, Laura, was thrown out of the house by her mother for loving another girl. "Go!" she said, "Get out of here until you decide to tell me who the culprit is. Go!" (25). I can't believe that a parent would not accept their child for who they are and love them unconditionally. It also shocked me that Laura's mother said: "I'm sorry, Laura, but I can't continue loving you if you stay gay." (27). This shows how much gays are looked down upon and aren't welcomed. Another event which frustrated me was her mom accepting her only when she has changed her "sinful" ways and becoming straight. Laura decided to date this guy not only to please her mom, but to see her brother again. It is beautiful to me how Laura is willing to sacrifice her happiness with a significant other in order to be with her brother. This book made me realize that there is a lot expected of you in the Cuban culture, but they are truly loving people.


message 11: by Matt (new)

Matt Fernandez | 12 comments There have been many shocking things that have happened throughout the novel but two major things stood out. One thing that stood out to me is that Oscar had two girlfriends and kept them at the same time for quite a while. His charm must really get the ladies about his nerdiness. The way he keeps them for a while is hilarious and inspiring for people to keep a relationship. Another thing that shocked about is that he actually is inspiring me to find a girl. If he can have two girlfriends at the same time then I can at least go look for my girl. He's showing that even though he may seem different than people with his culture, he can still be with somebody and be happier than someone with a culture from here.

P.S. I'm sorry if this goodreads isn't good, I just checked this prompt with ten minutes left :(


message 12: by 03jarrettp (new)

03jarrettp | 17 comments Throughout the entirety of this novel, many events have come to bring great shock and awe to my eyes. To begin, after reading as far as I have into this interesting novel, finding out in the beginning that he used to be the popular kid and get all the girls surprises me. As he is the nerdy video game player now it shocks me that he managed to get the girls and be the popular guy. I find it odd that he went through such a drastic transformation in such a short time. Another overall feeling that effects me is the way they act and hold themselves in the dominican republic culture. They seem to be very fetched upon falling in love and finding their true love. It seems to be one of Oscar's main problems and goals in life. The commonality to my life is that Oscar is trying to find who he is and where he fits in with friend groups and people. I can relate as I thought I had found my friend group but as I see know almost all of them have changed around me. He watches his friends change and he has to ponder if they are actually his friends. People make decisions that can end friendships in this book and in real life and I find that to be the most useful thing from this book. As for the culture standpoint, yes it does change my perceptions as I did not have many perceptions to begin with. Seeing as love is a major point in their culture, it does change my perceptions greatly.


message 13: by 03isabellag (new)

03isabellag | 14 comments In my novel, "The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Woe," Oscar is a young boy growing up and going from the Dominican Republic to th United States. He is introduced to many struggles throughout his childhood, the main one being that he gains am exceeding amount of weight and loses many friends because of it. He also finds out that his mother has cancer and his sister is so overwhelmed by the situation she runs away and only calls Oscar for money. One shocking thing to me is that Oscar turned his back on Lola, his sister, and told his mother that she had run away and where he was meeting her. This suprises me because his sister was one of his only friends that he had left, and to me I would think he would do whatever it took to keep her as a friend. Another thing shocking to was that when Lola was confronted by her mother she attempted to run away again. Not only is it shocking to me that she would run away from her dying mother, but what shocked me even more was that her mother pretended to fall on the ground and acted like she was dying, only so that when Lola came back to make sure she was okay, to get and start beating her daughter. This changed my outlook on the Domincan Republics culture because it makes me wonder if it is okay for children to disrespect their parents, as long as their parents punish them fairly by beating them. I found that scene very shocking overall because of the relationship between Lola and her mother and Lola and Oscar, even though Oscar thought he was doing the right thing.


message 14: by 03NikoT (new)

03NikoT | 29 comments The setting of Dracula is Transylvania. During the story, thru descriptions of the castle, the food and etiquette of characters and people, one can infer that Transylvania is wealthy, or at least sophisticated. Just the fact that Dracula is a count I found interesting, as this term seems to be specifically used in formal countries and areas. Also, his living in a castle was interesting. It seems the country itself has an inviting but high class, almost lavish feel.


message 15: by 03sammyn (new)

03sammyn | 17 comments In The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, there are two major events that shocked me. The first event was when Oscar attempted to commit suicide. As Yunior describes, Oscar drank a third bottle of Cisco, stood on a ledge 77 feet above the ground, and “before he could lose his courage, he threw himself down into the darkness” (190). Although Oscar did have a miserable life, I would never had thought he would attempt suicide. Just the thought of suicide brings terror and fear in me, so this event shocked me quite a bit. Another unexpected event was all the horror Abelard and his family faced. After being falsely arrested, Abelard, Oscar’s g-pa, is beaten, and his children and grandchildren are killed, tortured, and are made into slaves. This event shocks me because it shows just how cruel and difficult Santo Domingo was, and it makes me grateful to live where I do. This book has made my perspective on the Dominican Republic different than what is was before. Prior to Oscar Wao I did not know much about the troubles of the Republic, but after reading what happened to Belicia and Adelard, I realize just how tough it is. This books makes my sympathetic for the people living in the Dominican Republic.


message 16: by Jo (new)

Jo Belmonte | 3 comments There are two things that enlightened me in the novel, The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri. One quote was the way Ashima described how being a foreigner is like, "Ashima is beginning to realize, is a sort of lifelong pregnancy --a perpetual wait . . . only to discover that that previous life has vanished"(49). What Ashima said was true because moving to a new country aloows your previous life to be forgotten as you try to adapt to a completely different culture. Another quote that enlightened me me was, "She has the gift of accepting her life; as he comes to know her, he realizes that she has never wished she were anyone other than herself, raised in any other place, in any other way"(138). The quote implies that you should always accept the way you are. And I think it's true that you should embrace your culture and your true self. The novel didn't alter my perception because I'm always welcoming of other cultures whether they're different or not.


message 17: by 03SheilyM (new)

03SheilyM | 20 comments In my book The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao there are several surprising and shocking moments through the book. One that stood out to me was in the beginning of the book when Oscar thinks he's fat and ugly and that even his own friends don't want to be seen with him. This shocked me because they were Oscar's " friends " and they didn't even want to be seen with Oscar because they were embarrased. Another part of the story that was surprising is when Oscar's sister ran away from home. Oscar's sister running away from home was surprising because she was a teenager when she left and she didn't have any many or food. Even though I didn't know too much about the Dominican Republic culture what I do know now from the book and it makes me wonder if most Dominican Republic families do crazy things like Oscar's.


message 18: by 03nascoa (new)

03nascoa | 15 comments Two major things that have really surprised me about this story has to be woland and his gang. Woland being Satan and fiello being a killing demon has really changed my outlook on Russian literature of this time period. I thought that it would be similar to Bulgarian literature due to them both being Slavic Countries. I now see Russian literature as this peculiar mythical jargon about religion which will almost indefinitely include the devil. I hope to read another Russian literature book of the time period so I can really have a set opinion toward Russian literature.
P.S. sorry this was late I didn't see this posted earlier when I checked on Sunday but then received several emails notifying me of the thread.


message 19: by 03shelbyt (new)

03shelbyt | 12 comments Two major events in The Brief "Wonderous Life of Oscar Wao" that surprised me were the two murders.

Beli is pregnant with "the Gangsters" baby, and because he's actually married to Trujillos sister this causes big problems for Beli. Trujillos sister and some other members come to beat up Beli. They take her to an abandoned canefield and hurt her very badly. Some of the damage was "five ribs, broken; left kidney, bruised; right lung, collapsed; front teeth, blown out"(Diaz 146). During all of this Beli never cried some how. However, when she was finally rescued and brought home she wailed. She cried because she had lost the baby, through all of the pain she hadn't realized that could've happen.

The next day she hears a funeral song and says "Mamá, is that for me? Am I dying?"(Diaz 155). Beli is not dying, but Trujillo had been murdered the same night her baby was. This surprised me because he supposedly had a lot of protection and people to back him up yet he was brutally shot and killed.


message 20: by Juan (new)

Juan Santos | 4 comments two major ideas that shocked me was when gogol's dad died and when gogol sleep with and england woman named moushumi. this book has changed my view of culture because many culture's are different and what seems normal to us is weird to others.they do things differently


message 21: by Wyatt (new)

Wyatt Bensing | 4 comments When her dad died and also when she dates her first white guy suprised me because when her dad died it changed he whole way of life. No it didn't alter my perceptions because in the end she became a better person.


message 22: by Jadengrandey (new)

Jadengrandey | 10 comments Down to the Bone by Mayra Lazara Dole gives readers a whole new perspective on families who originate from other cultures or countries. It shocked me the amount of racism different cultures receive. I never knew the brutality they were treated with. Another shocking outcome was the disapproval and the reaction of Laura's mother when she discovered Laura was a lesbian. Mothers are relied on to support their cildren, but Laura's mother did the exact oppisite and kicked her out of the house. Not only did this book give me a new perspective on the treatment of people from different cultures, but the treatment of people of different sexuality.


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