On Reading Graphic Novels discussion

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Related Topics > Difference between graphic novels and comics?

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message 1: by Maria (new)

Maria (wejrdness) | 2 comments Hi everyone
I need to write an essay for school about young adult fiction. I have now some difficulties with the definition of graphic novel. And it would be nice if someone could explain me what exactly a graphic novel is and what are the differences between graphic novel and comic books/comic strips. I found nothing helpful on the internet.
I am sorry if there are some errors but I am not a native English speaker.
:)


message 2: by Dan's (new)

Dan's | 5 comments eh why don't U start form the basic stuff

try this book on top
https://www.goodreads.com/search?q=un...

[ damn my whole comment got erased, I will have to re post another time]


message 3: by Rachel (new)

Rachel Mars (goodreadscomrachel_mars) | 3 comments Hi Maria, The major difference between comic books/graphic novels/and comic strips is the length of the stories.

A comic strip would be the shortest, these are the little ongoing picture stories that one would see in a news paper only a couple boxes long. These can be found online these days as well.

Comic books are ongoing series as well and are put out in a magazine style format either weekly, or monthly and sometimes even longer than that. They are usually parts of a long story divided up into pieces. Sometimes these comic books are collected in a book with different volumes once they get a good number put out.

Graphic Novels would be the longest. They tell more in depth stories and don't always have a follow up book. These are thicker and are like paperback books.

Think of a comic book as a television series and a graphic novel as a movie.


message 4: by Maria (new)

Maria (wejrdness) | 2 comments Rachel wrote: "Hi Maria, The major difference between comic books/graphic novels/and comic strips is the length of the stories.

A comic strip would be the shortest, these are the little ongoing picture storie..."


Thank you so much for the help :)


message 5: by Rachel (new)

Rachel Mars (goodreadscomrachel_mars) | 3 comments Sure thing, happy to help and good luck!


message 6: by Tommy (new)

Tommy Hancock (tommyhancock) | 1 comments Rachel's answer was pretty spot on. Although, there are many overlaps. For instance, Watchmen by Alan Moore is considered a great graphic novel, even though it's actually a collection of 12 monthly comic issues that released over the course of a year. So is Watchmen a limited comics series, or is it a graphic novel?

The terminology is confusing, and I guess if Comics=TV sho and GN=movie, a limited series like Watchmen might be kind of a mini-series.

Still, Rachel's answer is about as close to definitive as I think you're gonna get.


message 7: by Rachel (new)

Rachel Mars (goodreadscomrachel_mars) | 3 comments Tommy wrote: "Rachel's answer was pretty spot on. Although, there are many overlaps. For instance, Watchmen by Alan Moore is considered a great graphic novel, even though it's actually a collection of 12 mo..."

Ah the elusive miniseries. Thanks for the add/edit Tommy!


message 8: by Jack (new)

Jack (kcorstel) | 28 comments Yeah, graphic novel is a tricky definition. I work in a library and we call everything Graphic Novels. In that context, I think of a graphic novel as being any work of comic art with a spine, EVEN THOUGH that definition includes lots of things that the wider comics reading population would not TECHNICALLY consider a graphic novel. For my purposes as a librarian, the distinction between something that was originally published as a long-form work and something that was originally published in single issues is not an important one.

In the professional comics community, a "Graphic Novel" is something that is specifically published as a longer form work, whereas something that offers a collected reprinting of single issues (which makes up probably about 70% of the big books of comics you see out there) is referred to as a "trade paperback," a "trade," or a "collected edition." In this context, the differentiation between something that was originally published all together and something that was originally published as single issues (whether as a mini-series or a chapter in an ongoing series) is more important for both economic reasons (being able to sell your work twice -- first as issues and then as a collection -- is nice) and for artistic reasons (writing for single issues means every 22 pages of story has to have its own mini-arc, even if it's part of a much larger story).

In my general life though? It's all just comics. Comics as an art form is what happens when you have a series of pictures that are deliberately placed side by side in order to tell a story. When I identify myself as "a comics reader," it doesn't matter if I'm talking about Calvin and Hobbes strips, single issues of Batman, or a 500 page work like Blankets. I like stories in pictures, therefore I like comics.

I'm sure this only adds to the general confusion...


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