Women's Classic Literature Enthusiasts discussion

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July's People > Discussion Schedule

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message 1: by Lisa (new)

Lisa (lisadannatt) | 304 comments Discussion Schedule for our February group read


message 2: by Lisa (new)

Lisa (lisadannatt) | 304 comments Week 1 Feb 2- 8: chapters 1-6
Week 2 Feb 9- 15: chapters 7- 12
Week 3 Feb 16- 22: chapters 13- 16
Week 4 Feb 23-28: chapters 17- 20


message 3: by Anastasia Kinderman, The Only (new)

Anastasia Kinderman | 654 comments Mod
Yay! It seems like a fairly short book.


message 4: by ☯Emily , The First (last edited Feb 01, 2015 11:18AM) (new)

☯Emily  Ginder | 1209 comments Mod
Well, the first page was confusing! I hope the writing style becomes less disjointed as the storyline unwinds.


message 5: by Lisa (new)

Lisa (lisadannatt) | 304 comments Really hope I'm up to this task. Emotionally, this is going to be challenging.


message 6: by Theresa (new)

Theresa | 28 comments ready to roll


message 7: by Alexa (new)

Alexa (AlexaNC) | 435 comments My edition doesn't have chapter numbers, but it is broken into unnumbered sections - I'll assume those are the chapters? Do you have associated page numbers? My sixth section ends on page 49 (out of 160).


message 8: by Lisa (new)

Lisa (lisadannatt) | 304 comments How many numbered sections. Total of 20 chapters. My copy's chapter 6 ends on p61 of 195.
The first sentence of chapter 7:'Her husband was pumping the Primus.'

I'll work out the others


message 9: by Alexa (new)

Alexa (AlexaNC) | 435 comments Oh great, that means my sections are your chapters. The first sentence was a great help - the page numbers don't seem to be as useful. Thanks!


message 10: by ☯Emily , The First (new)

☯Emily  Ginder | 1209 comments Mod
My edition doesn't have chapters, but the first 6 sections end on page 49. It looks like I have the same edition as Alexa.


message 11: by Alexa (new)

Alexa (AlexaNC) | 435 comments Odd how they published it in different formats - it's going to be a little bit tricky keeping track of these sections. I can't number them, it's from the library!


message 12: by Alexa (new)

Alexa (AlexaNC) | 435 comments For week 2, my 12th section ends on page 90, and the next section starts, "At first the women in the fields ignored her...."


message 13: by Lisa (last edited Feb 05, 2015 12:35AM) (new)

Lisa (lisadannatt) | 304 comments Are your books hard- copy? Mine is an updated ecopy. Often happens with SAn books as they are often initially published overseas (like this banned book would have been) then republished locally later with a format change


message 14: by Lisa (new)

Lisa (lisadannatt) | 304 comments Alexa wrote: "For week 2, my 12th section ends on page 90, and the next section starts, "At first the women in the fields ignored her....""

That fits with my chapter 13 start.


message 15: by Lisa (new)

Lisa (lisadannatt) | 304 comments Alexa wrote: "Odd how they published it in different formats - it's going to be a little bit tricky keeping track of these sections. I can't number them, it's from the library!"

Maybe work it out for the whole book and use removal sticky notes to indicate places?


Andrea AKA Catsos Person (catsosperson) | 315 comments I too have the sucky chapter-less edition that Alexa has.

I'm using post-it note to keep track.


message 17: by Anastasia Kinderman, The Only (new)

Anastasia Kinderman | 654 comments Mod
Lisa wrote: "Are your books hard- copy? Mine is an updated ecopy. Often happens with SAn books as they are often initially published overseas (like this banned book would have been) then republished locally lat..."

Lisa, why was the book banned?

My copy doesn't have chapter numbers either. I might write them in.


message 18: by Anastasia Kinderman, The Only (new)

Anastasia Kinderman | 654 comments Mod
Anastasia wrote: "Lisa, why was the book banned?"

I looked up but I'm still a bit confused. So the apartheid government (I hope I'm using these terms right) obviously didn't like it but the current government didn't like it either....?


message 19: by ☯Emily , The First (new)

☯Emily  Ginder | 1209 comments Mod
I read somewhere that the current government considered it racist.


message 20: by Lisa (new)

Lisa (lisadannatt) | 304 comments This book was banned under the Apartheid government as Gordimer was questioning the very nature of Apartheid, promoting racial equality and daring to suggest that the Apartheid government was wrong. Under Apartheid, this could have been considered treasonous.

Gordimer was one of the anti- Apartheid white authors. She did not leave SA to go into exile. She was well respected by former president Nelson Mandela and worked with his lawyer George Bizos during the treason trial. She aided Madiba in the editing of his 'I am prepared to die' speach.

Madiba was quoted as having read her not banned works in prison to better understand white South Africa. She was apparently someone that he asked to meet shortly after his release.

Gordimer was well recognized by Madiba's government for her literary achievements. I linked to the SA history site where she is recognized. I don't think the current government regards the book as racist. It is not banned.

Due to the fact that many SA books were banned during Apartheid & published overseas, our access is often more limited still.

Other white SA authors who were anti- Apartheid include Ingrid Jonker, JM Coetzee, Andre Brink and Bruiten Bruitenbach. Authors of colour (black consciousness writers) include Mongane Wally Serote, Zeke Mphahlele, Chris van Wyk, Can Tema, Casey Motsisti, Damon Runyon, Bloke Modisane. I'm probably leaving many names out.

I am not as well read into SA struggle literature as I would like to be. I've read Jonker, Brink, Coetzee, Serote and van Wyk.


message 21: by Lisa (new)

Lisa (lisadannatt) | 304 comments The Apartheid government was terrifying, you did not mess with them. There were white South Africans who did not agree, but they were so afraid that speaking out was just not possible. (Think about the average German living in Nazi Germany.)
I've spent more of my life living within democracy, I have two very distinct recollections of Apartheid from childhood, but most of what I know is learnt as an adult. My dad reminded me of this fear recently, he was visiting and digging in my book shelves for something to read. He found my books by the aforementioned authors and he looked genuinely nervous, he commented something along the lines of; '30 years ago if you were caught with these, you would disappear.'


message 22: by ☯Emily , The First (new)

☯Emily  Ginder | 1209 comments Mod
This is a long article/obituary written by the NY Times about Ms. Gordimer. http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/15/boo...


message 23: by ☯Emily , The First (last edited Feb 05, 2015 09:58AM) (new)

☯Emily  Ginder | 1209 comments Mod
I'm not sure July's People was ever actually banned after Apartheid. However, it was on a list to be banned in 2001. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainm... and http://articles.courant.com/2001-04-2...


message 24: by Lisa (new)

Lisa (lisadannatt) | 304 comments Everything I've read, our sites, all state that it was banned.

Also, I'm not sure that the critique was that her work was racist, rather could not accurately reflect a non-white perspective as she herself was white


message 25: by Lisa (new)

Lisa (lisadannatt) | 304 comments Thanks for these links.


message 26: by Lisa (new)

Lisa (lisadannatt) | 304 comments I remember noise being made about Othello and King Lear being racist.


message 27: by ☯Emily , The First (new)

☯Emily  Ginder | 1209 comments Mod
Having just read Othello, I can see how it would be viewed as racist. However, that doesn't mean it should be banned.


message 28: by Lisa (new)

Lisa (lisadannatt) | 304 comments I understand the view too, but I don't think that banning books has much of a point. Books should be used to start a discussion, to question what is said, to reflect on one's views.


message 29: by Anastasia Kinderman, The Only (new)

Anastasia Kinderman | 654 comments Mod
Lisa wrote: "I understand the view too, but I don't think that banning books has much of a point. Books should be used to start a discussion, to question what is said, to reflect on one's views."

I think the worst possible thing you can do if you dislike a book is ban it. That just makes people curious!


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