You'll love this one...!! A book club & more discussion

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Group Themed Reads: Discussions > February 2015 - Time

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message 1: by Kat (new)

Kat (katzombie) | 2478 comments Discuss here any books with a time theme!

Please tell us what you thought about the book, not just that you read it.

New This Month This month we will trial a reporting thread for Group Reads to see if we can save Sarah and I a few grey hairs when awarding badges. Please remember to report in once you have finished discussing.


message 2: by Sarah, Moderator (new)

Sarah | 18168 comments Yes I want to hold of the grey as long as possible thanks ;-) I'm going to be reading Slaughterhouse-Five (well listening to) for this months theme and it is also a toppler book.


message 3: by Cherie (new)

Cherie (crobins0) | 19745 comments I am rolling on the floor laughing. I just found out that my Spelling Bee Challenge book had time travel in it! The main character has just been pulled into the past by no less than Merlin himself!


message 4: by Janice, Moderator (new)

Janice (jamasc) | 47863 comments What are you reading Cherie? I've forgotten if you've already mentioned it.

I read Twelve Years a Slave last week and I could use it here. I shall think about it. Perhaps it will be a fall back book if I don't finish Life After Life.


message 5: by Travis (new)

Travis (travistousant) | 5997 comments Time and Again great so far. One of the few Stwphen King recs I agree with him on so far


message 6: by Lara (new)

Lara | 1426 comments I'm reading The Paper Magician right now and just realized it would fit. Not only is there a very short timeline to save someone's life, there is passage through someone's memories.


message 7: by Mariab (new)

Mariab | 3059 comments yay! I must decide wich book (from many) I m going to read!


message 8: by Sandra (new)

Sandra (sanlema) | 9278 comments I'll be reading The Time Machine. Is anyone else reading this?


message 9: by Mariab (new)

Mariab | 3059 comments I read the time machine long ago. I liked it very much. Have had my hesitations in concern to some parts, but found the book appealing despite of that


message 10: by Sarah, Moderator (new)

Sarah | 18168 comments Sandra wrote: "I'll be reading The Time Machine. Is anyone else reading this?"

I may read it for the toppler but it depends on how things go with my move and finishing the books I've already committed to. It also depends on my mood at the time - classics and me don't usually mix well.

@Travis - sounds promising.


message 11: by Sarah, Moderator (new)

Sarah | 18168 comments Cherie wrote: "I am rolling on the floor laughing. I just found out that my Spelling Bee Challenge book had time travel in it! The main character has just been pulled into the past by no less than Merlin himself!"

Did you're future self who had read that book suggest you read it knowing it would contain time travel and therefore you could use it for the challenge AND this month's theme read?! ;-)


message 12: by Tasha (new)

Tasha Travis of NNY wrote: "Time and Again great so far. One of the few Stwphen King recs I agree with him on so far"

I'll be trying to get this one read for the monthly read. Glad to hear it's good!


message 13: by Cherie (last edited Feb 02, 2015 07:34PM) (new)

Cherie (crobins0) | 19745 comments Janice wrote: "What are you reading Cherie? I've forgotten if you've already mentioned it.

I read Twelve Years a Slave last week and I could use it here. I shall think about it. Perhaps it wil..."


Sorry, Janice, I wasn't ignoring you, but I wanted to make sure I gave you a link. Believe. It really is pretty funny so far.

I cannot bring myself to read your book.


message 14: by Cherie (new)

Cherie (crobins0) | 19745 comments Sarah wrote: "Yes I want to hold of the grey as long as possible thanks ;-) I'm going to be reading Slaughterhouse-Five (well listening to) for this months theme and it is also a toppler book."

I had no idea that this book had time travel in it. I have alwys had an aversion to reading Kurt Vonnegut. I will be interested to hear how it was.


message 15: by Cherie (new)

Cherie (crobins0) | 19745 comments Sarah wrote: "Cherie wrote: "I am rolling on the floor laughing. I just found out that my Spelling Bee Challenge book had time travel in it! The main character has just been pulled into the past by no less tha..."

Strange as it seems, Sarah, I not at all. I had no idea what it was about except that it had a lot of criteria for the challenge points and it had Merlin in it.


message 16: by Lara (new)

Lara | 1426 comments I just finished The Ugly Duchess in which a couple separates right after marriage and the issue of whether the husband can be declared dead (after 7 years) becomes a issue of importance.


message 17: by Sarah, Moderator (new)

Sarah | 18168 comments Cherie wrote: "I had no idea that this book had time travel in it. I have always had an aversion to reading Kurt Vonnegut. I will be interested to hear how it was."

Nor did I Cherie. I had it out of the library last year and it went back unread so I'm going to try again. I think we discussed the book title back then. I have it on audio this time. Will let you know what I think.


message 18: by Janice, Moderator (new)

Janice (jamasc) | 47863 comments Cherie wrote: "Janice wrote: "What are you reading Cherie? I've forgotten if you've already mentioned it.

I read Twelve Years a Slave last week and I could use it here. I shall think about it. ..."


Believe looks like a light read... unlike Twelve Years a Slave. I don't know if I did much of a review for it. I'm still at a bit of a loss as to how to articulate my thoughts and feelings on this one.

It's yet another book focused on slavery and the cruelties inflicted on them. This one, being a memoir, has a far greater impact than fiction.

When I finished reading it, I decided that I'm done reading about slavery in the south. It upsets me too much.

I recall a friend telling me that books that draw attention to the atrocities that are committed against peoples are necessary to read so that we are aware and can put our drop into the water to hopefully start a ripple effect, bringing about change. I believe the book we were discussing was Tears of the Desert: A Memoir of Survival in Darfur after which I declared I wasn't reading any more of those types of books.

Obviously, I didn't follow my own directive with Twelve Years a Slave. I think I'm aware of the slave's treatment, many times over, and it will be a while before I read another one I think.


message 19: by Janice, Moderator (new)

Janice (jamasc) | 47863 comments Lara wrote: "I just finished The Ugly Duchess in which a couple separates right after marriage and the issue of whether the husband can be declared dead (after 7 years) becomes a issue of import..."

Did you read this for the theme? Or are you just commenting that it could fit the theme?

If you did read for the theme, what are your thoughts and opinions about the issues brought forward in it? Did you like the book? Would you recommend it?


message 20: by Casceil (new)

Casceil | 2615 comments Re: Slaughterhouse-Five. I'm not sure whether I would call it time "travel" exactly. It's more that Billy Pilgrim becomes "unstuck" in time.


message 21: by Travis (new)

Travis (travistousant) | 5997 comments Finished Time and Again which to me ended upore historical fiction than sci fi. Great details of life in 1880's NYC. Had just a brief sci fi part in beginning describing the project itself. A little bit of detective story tied in as well with a quite satisfying ending


message 22: by Sarah, Moderator (new)

Sarah | 18168 comments Casceil wrote: "Re: Slaughterhouse-Five. I'm not sure whether I would call it time "travel" exactly. It's more that Billy Pilgrim becomes "unstuck" in time."

Interesting Casceil! It does appear on a Listopia for Best Time Travel Books and I was intending to read it for the Time Travel/dual time perspectives task in the toppler.


message 23: by Sarah, Moderator (new)

Sarah | 18168 comments Travis of NNY wrote: "Finished Time and Again which to me ended upore historical fiction than sci fi. Great details of life in 1880's NYC. Had just a brief sci fi part in beginning describing the project ..."

Wow - historical fiction, mystery and sci-fi. I know it started well for you, saying you agreed with Stephen King's rec of this - did you have the same opinion when you finished?


message 24: by Sarah, Moderator (new)

Sarah | 18168 comments I started The Bone Clocks today - not intentionally for this challenge but as it has Clocks in the title, I might as well use it for the theme. The last David Mitchell book I read (Cloud Atlas) I really didn't like and abandoned it so I was a little wary of what this one would be like. I am listening to the audio and only decided to do so as I saw it was a new release on my library's app. Boy is this different to the other book. It's like it's a completely different author (in my opinion). This is really good so far - I've been completely sucked in and there are lots of little bits which have me curious and wanting to know more. Let's hope it stays this way as the audio is 24 hours - probably the longest audio I'll have listened to.


message 25: by Travis (new)

Travis (travistousant) | 5997 comments Sarah wrote: "Travis of NNY wrote: "Finished Time and Again which to me ended upore historical fiction than sci fi. Great details of life in 1880's NYC. Had just a brief sci fi part in beginning d..."

Yes it was just an excellent book. Debating about 4 or 5 stars on it. For quality time travel with a solid plot it is right up there with Doomsday Book. Maybe I liked it better actually. I never thought of 5 stars for Doomsday Book


message 26: by Casceil (new)

Casceil | 2615 comments Sarah, I did not mean to discourage you from using Slaughterhouse Five as your "time" book--it certainly qualifies. If you are interested in discussing Bone Clocks, it is being discussed over on the 21st Century Literature thread as the pick of the month. https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...


message 27: by Lara (new)

Lara | 1426 comments Janice wrote: "When I finished reading it, I decided that I'm done reading about slavery in the south. It upsets me too much."

That is why I have avoided it and the movie.


message 28: by Lara (new)

Lara | 1426 comments Janice wrote: "Did you read this for the theme? Or are you just commenting that it could fit the theme?

If you did read for the theme, what are your thoughts and opinions about the issues brought forward in it? Did you like the book? Would you recommend it?"


I didn't start The Ugly Duchess for the theme, but realized that it does fit. Eloisa James is a professor of English, so writes very well. Her books are usually pretty historically accurate, but this one is part of a series based on fairy tales (if you couldn't tell from the title), so she takes a number of liberties.

This particular book spans 1809 to 1816 or so. It has privateers, the spice trade, fashion, and some really pathetic men. That last was my main problem with the book. The only man who seemed worth anyone's time was the butler, and he was a minor character. Also, the relationship developed far to quickly, both at the start and in the end.


message 29: by Janice, Moderator (new)

Janice (jamasc) | 47863 comments The Ugly Duchess certainly covers a few genres according to the way it's rated. Perhaps people weren't sure what genre it belonged to.


message 30: by Lara (new)

Lara | 1426 comments Janice wrote: "The Ugly Duchess certainly covers a few genres according to the way it's rated. Perhaps people weren't sure what genre it belonged to."

I think it's definitely historical romance. However, there is a significant portion that takes place on the high seas.


message 31: by Sarah, Moderator (new)

Sarah | 18168 comments Casceil wrote: "Sarah, I did not mean to discourage you from using Slaughterhouse Five as your "time" book--it certainly qualifies."

Ok thanks for clarifying - panic over! And thanks for the link for The Bone Clocks, I'll check it out.


message 32: by Camilla (new)

Camilla | 1977 comments I will be reading Woman on the Edge of Time, will start today. It will be interesting to see how feminism is evident in the story (it has been shelved as feminism literature by quite many readers). The book has been written in 1970s, so it probably reflects that era.


message 33: by Camilla (new)

Camilla | 1977 comments Duh, my reading of Woman on the Edge of Time wasn't exactly a success: I didn't like the writing style at all and managed a total of 12 pages before deciding to abandon it. I will have to look whether I have something else available that would suit the theme.


message 34: by Sandra (new)

Sandra (sanlema) | 9278 comments Uh, I'm sorry Camilla. I hate when this happens to me...


message 35: by Sarah, Moderator (new)

Sarah | 18168 comments I hope you find a more engaging book to fit the theme Camilla.


message 36: by Kat (new)

Kat (katzombie) | 2478 comments Camilla wrote: "Duh, my reading of Woman on the Edge of Time wasn't exactly a success: I didn't like the writing style at all and managed a total of 12 pages before deciding to abandon it. I will hav..."

At least it was only 12 pages Camilla - sometimes you just have to make the decision to abandon and move on!


message 37: by Lanelle (new)

Lanelle | 3077 comments My favorite Jane Austen book is Persuasion, so when I came across Searching for Captain Wentworth I was so excited. And pleased when it turned out to be a wonderful story. I would give it four and a half stars!

When I saw that 'time' won the poll, I immediately decided to read this favorite book. I enjoyed reading it again. Now off to the reporting thread.


message 38: by Lisa (new)

Lisa (lisathebooklover) | 9244 comments I have just started The Daughter of Time. I have been wanting to read this for a while as I am really interested in Richard III and whether he was as bad/evil as history has made him out to be.


message 39: by Tejas Janet (new)

Tejas Janet (tejasjanet) | 3513 comments @Lisa - The Daughter of Time sounds intriguing. It's on my TBR list, too. Will be interested to hear how you like it.

@Sarah - Slaughterhouse-Five is a book I connected with back in my teens, partly for it's anti-war message, partly for it's sarcasm, absurdity, and insight into the human condition. I've re-read it several times over the years, and have continued to think it's amazing. However, it doesn't work for everyone. So it goes ;)


message 40: by Sarah, Moderator (new)

Sarah | 18168 comments It didn't work for me TJ, so it goes! I've finished it and have rated it one star. I listened to the audio book narrated by Ethan Hawke. Good narrator but I didn't think he suited this genre of book. I have a new voice crush though so I did get something out of reading the book. I got confused pretty early on with the time shifts - one minute he's in present day reality then back in the second world war and then in a ufo. I get it was anti-war which ordinarily I would have been interested to read but I was just lost. Maybe I'd have been better with a print version. I think it's another case of Sarah not getting on with Classics.


message 41: by Lisa (new)

Lisa (lisathebooklover) | 9244 comments I finished The Daughter of Time which I really enjoyed and rated 4 stars. I thought it was a really good mix of history and mystery and I learnt a couple of new things from it too. It was a bit slow to get going and I felt that the characters could have been a lot more fleshed out than they were (hence the four star rating) but on the whole, I would recommend it. I think it would make a great companion piece to The Sunne in Splendour - A Novel of Richard III which is one of my all-time favourite novels and also focuses on Richard III.


message 42: by Mariab (new)

Mariab | 3059 comments Lisa wrote: "I finished The Daughter of Time which I really enjoyed and rated 4 stars. I thought it was a really good mix of history and mystery and I learnt a couple of new things from it too. I..."

Glad to hear it, Lisa. It was/is in my TBR shelf long enough now


message 43: by Liz (new)

Liz   (lizvegas) | 504 comments I finished The Impossible Lives of Greta Wellsby Andrew Sean Greer. I was completely intrigued by the premise of this novel: women gets a radical psychiatric treatment- side effect = time travel!

However, overall it was just "meh".
The main story takes place in 1985 where the main character, Greta, undergoes electroshock therapy to combat her severe depression (her twin brother has recently died, and her boyfriend has left her). Each time she receives a treatment she cycles between her own time, and the years 1918 and 1941. In each time period, the characters are the same, but take on different roles.
I kept my anticipation that this was going to be a kick ass story for about 80 pages. At that point, I started wishing the book was only 85 pages. :) It just fell flat for me, and there wasn't enough variation between each episode of time travel. Quite frankly, it started to feel like I was experiencing Groundhog's day.

I'm curious if anyone else here has read this?


message 44: by Cherie (new)

Cherie (crobins0) | 19745 comments No one that I recognize in the group has read it yet, Liz. I looked at the list of reviewers and do not recognize anyone either. Several group members have it on their TBR list.

Too bad it was not better for you, but those are the breaks sometimes. Group read themes can get you to read outside of your comfort zone, and you never know, when you will find a hidden gem.

Your consolation prize will be a pretty badge on your wall of fame at least. :0)


message 45: by Kat (new)

Kat (katzombie) | 2478 comments Sarah wrote: "It didn't work for me TJ, so it goes! I've finished it and have rated it one star. I listened to the audio book narrated by Ethan Hawke. Good narrator but I didn't think he suited this genre of boo..."

Well, I'm off to find a book narrated by Ethan Hawke now. All about the voice crush!


message 46: by Kat (new)

Kat (katzombie) | 2478 comments And I just realised, my current audiobook, The Time Traveler's Wife is the perfect fit for the theme. Totally accidental choice.

I read it a few years ago in paperback, so am interested to see if I like the audio more or less.

I also really enjoyed the movie, although my love of Eric Bana may have biased me slightly...


message 47: by Tasha (last edited Feb 15, 2015 05:57AM) (new)

Tasha Liz, I haven't read The Impossible Lives of Greta Wells but it's been on my radar from our other group. I haven't read it bc it seems others have felt the same way you did. Not sure if I will now. It's too bad bc the premise sounds so good!


message 48: by Tejas Janet (last edited Feb 18, 2015 07:25PM) (new)

Tejas Janet (tejasjanet) | 3513 comments A Wind in the Door was one of my mystery date toppler books. It's book 2 in A Wrinkle in Time Quintet. I'd hoped it might work for this challenge, but while it had a teensy time travel aspect, it was kind of a stretch I felt.

This week I moved on to book 3, A Swiftly Tilting Planet, and it has delivered in spades. The book is filled with time travel episodes - and a magic unicorn that the intrepid Charles Wallace gets to ride on the wind thru time.

So far I still think book 1 is the only one I'd call "amazing." Book 3 is more interesting than book 2. I have no idea what will happen with books 4 and 5, but I plan to find out in short order since I'm so engrossed in the series now.


message 49: by Sarah, Moderator (new)

Sarah | 18168 comments I'd love to hear about the time travel aspect in your books - I know the theme is time so you may not have time travel in them but as I like science fiction I'd like to know more on that aspect of time. What mode did they use to travel in time? was it a time loop, a tardis etc. Did they travel forward or backwards in time or both? why did they travel through time? was it for love, to change things in their last, to change history? Looking to add some extra books to my wishlist!

As an aside, when I typed in tardis on the app, it autocorrected to Travis which made me laugh.


message 50: by Camilla (new)

Camilla | 1977 comments Sarah wrote: "As an aside, when I typed in tardis on the app, it autocorrected to Travis which made me laugh."

ROFL! Maybe Travis should change his GR name to Tardis then!

Sadly, it seems I am unable to find anything suitable for this challenge before the end of the month. I'm planning to read Doomsday Book for another group's challenge later during the spring, but cannot fit it into February. BTW, that is another series that our library has managed to collect rather poorly: they have the first and third books, but not the second one. Hmph!


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