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MEMBER'S THREADS > THE BIG BOOK BRAG / HALL OF SHAME

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message 1: by Traveller (last edited Oct 20, 2015 04:25AM) (new)

Traveller (moontravlr) | 2522 comments Mod
No, it's not just about BIG books. :) It's also about what you've managed to finish and feel proud about, and what you managed to buy and feel happy about.

I just wanted to shout out in jubilation to the world that my copies of Textermination and Novel Without a Name have finally arrived! Yaye!

This would also be a good place to place your shame out there for everyone to see; those books that you've tried at and failed, and worse, those that just sit on your shelf but you are too afraid to even start them.


message 2: by Paul (new)

Paul Bryant I plucked up the nerve to buy The Tunnel by William Gass and I'm reading it one page at a time.


message 3: by Mala (new)

Mala | 3 comments Paul wrote: "I plucked up the nerve to buy The Tunnel by William Gass and I'm reading it one page at a time."

I can already visualise a typical Paul Bryant two-stars review...but am kinda happy you are giving it a try.


message 4: by Traveller (new)

Traveller (moontravlr) | 2522 comments Mod
Mala wrote: "Paul wrote: "I plucked up the nerve to buy The Tunnel by William Gass and I'm reading it one page at a time."

I can already visualise a typical Paul Bryant two-stars review...but am kinda happy yo..."


Ooh, I've had The Tunnel on the TBR for ages now... maybe a Paul Bryant review will spur me to read it so I can defend it! XD


message 5: by Mala (new)

Mala | 3 comments And Trav you're already confident you're gonna love the book ;-) ?


message 6: by Paul (new)

Paul Bryant The Tunnel : so far YET ANOTHER middle aged white self loathing academic stewing and madly ranting in his foul study.... just what the world needs, right?


message 7: by Mala (new)

Mala | 3 comments See, he started already! The rant, I mean.


message 8: by Gregsamsa (new)

Gregsamsa | 20 comments Paul wrote: "YET ANOTHER middle aged white self loathing academic stewing and madly ranting in his foul study.... just what the world needs, right?"

Good to see you haven't prematurely settled on any preconceptions.


message 9: by Paul (new)

Paul Bryant I hope it gets better, otherwise I'm fearing for the sanity of the small coterie of Gass five-starrers.


message 10: by Gregsamsa (last edited Jan 29, 2015 08:08AM) (new)

Gregsamsa | 20 comments I'm flirting with News from the Empire's 720 pages of small print and vast baroque sentences, but may hold off, still smarting from the demands of La Medusa.


message 11: by Traveller (new)

Traveller (moontravlr) | 2522 comments Mod
Mala wrote: "And Trav you're already confident you're gonna love the book ;-) ?"

Well, I saw some quotes from when a friend was reading it, and I kinda fell in love just with his style alone - but okay, I can't promise that I will. But Paul usually hates my kind of book, much as I love him and his very amusing reviews. You know, it's Paul that inadvertently brought me to GR - I started following his very amusing pieces around 5 or 6 years ago, and eventually decided to join. I followed him exclusively for a while, and then I suddenly realized what cool features the site in general has. So, you're very special to me, Paul, much as we don't always agree 100% on things. :P


message 12: by Traveller (new)

Traveller (moontravlr) | 2522 comments Mod
Greg, believe it or not, but I have never read Dworkin in the original, though I have access to all her works. Now Warwick has reminded me that i still wanted to get to her from closer quarters. If you were to rec something that was very representative of her work, which would that be? (Assuming you have an opinion on that).


message 13: by Gregsamsa (last edited Jan 29, 2015 08:28AM) (new)

Gregsamsa | 20 comments I have never read a full book of hers or Catherine MacKinnon with whom she is often lumped, but I've read many essays and excerpts that have been collected in feminist anthologies. I will dig around in those and try to find the one that has the most of her stuff, and get back to you.

I can tell you that her most oft-cited book is Intercourse.


message 14: by Traveller (new)

Traveller (moontravlr) | 2522 comments Mod
Yeah, i saw Intercourse is top of the list, and I actually have it. Don't know if i have it in my pants to tackle it, though, but we'll see. Thanks!


message 15: by Traveller (new)

Traveller (moontravlr) | 2522 comments Mod
This one seems to have been getting rave reviews. I might decide to be a ninny and go for it instead. I must say she definitely looks like she's on the war path and very formidable on the cover there!




message 16: by Paul (new)

Paul Bryant kind words, Trav - I had no idea about that.... and I surely don't usually hate on your favourite books, do I?

(insert horrified face gif)


message 17: by Traveller (new)

Traveller (moontravlr) | 2522 comments Mod
Well... "hate" might be a strong word... :D


message 18: by Gregsamsa (new)

Gregsamsa | 20 comments Trav, re Dworkin: I first came across her in a gay mag and liked her but then the broad generalizations and seemingly personal hostility, coupled with so much reliance on gross anecdotal evidence, I had to bail, in favor of groovier feminists like Constance Penley on the academic/cultural end and Susan Faludi on the mainstream/political end. I think Dworkin did more harm than good to feminism. Think about the negative stereotype of feminists. She did that. I'm by no means saying not to read her, though.


message 19: by Traveller (new)

Traveller (moontravlr) | 2522 comments Mod
Gregsamsa wrote: "I think Dworkin did more harm than good to feminism. Think about the negative stereotype of feminists. She did that. I'm by no means saying not to read her, though. ..."

I've been getting that same impression. You know, I'm a curious cat. I believe instinctively in the maxim: "Know thine enemy."
I feel one should perhaps investigate the entire range so that you have an idea what you're talking about, and so that it becomes more easily apparent where which influences originated.

Don't worry, I'm not going to turn into a raving man-hater overnight! :)
Men have their uses, and I'm not just talking about hetero men. ;) I like 'em all.


message 20: by Saski (new)

Saski (sissah) | 399 comments I just asked my wife about Dworkin and Luce Irigaray (re: our discussion on 1984). She apologizes, she only has Irigaray in French, but she has two Dworkin, one a novel. I'm game, say in the next 6 to 18 months, if anyone else is.


message 21: by Traveller (new)

Traveller (moontravlr) | 2522 comments Mod
Ruth wrote: "I just asked my wife about Dworkin and Luce Irigaray (re: our discussion on 1984). She apologizes, she only has Irigaray in French, but she has two Dworkin, one a novel. I'm game, say in the next..."

Kewl puppies! I'll certainly join you! Which are those, Ruth? Names?


message 22: by Saski (new)

Saski (sissah) | 399 comments The novel is Ice and Fire and the non-fiction is Pornography -

Kewl puppies? :)


message 23: by Traveller (new)

Traveller (moontravlr) | 2522 comments Mod
Ruth wrote: "The novel is Ice and Fire and the non-fiction is Pornography -

Kewl puppies? :)"


Hoo boy... Okay let's do Pornography, but I quake in my boots, I tell ya...

Kewl puppies<<< latest thing kids are saying in lieu of the old-fashioned "cool". :x


message 24: by Saski (new)

Saski (sissah) | 399 comments How cute!

Yeah, I am scared too.


message 25: by Gregsamsa (new)

Gregsamsa | 20 comments Oh, two more brief comments re Dworkin: just going by her written work is to get an incomplete picture of her cultural position. She went on television a lot, being very strident, which would have been cool if there had been an MLK to her Malcolm X approach, but the pop conception of what a feminist is got owned by her cuz her bombast made for good TV. That's not to say some of her man bashing wasn't warranted. She pointed out subtle ways men intimidate women, as well as how they are insensitive to security issues that men give no thought to, from ill-lit parking lots to being asked to say your address out loud at the DMV.


message 26: by Traveller (new)

Traveller (moontravlr) | 2522 comments Mod
Gregsamsa wrote: "Oh, two more brief comments re Dworkin: just going by her written work is to get an incomplete picture of her cultural position. She went on television a lot, being very strident, which would hav..."

Thanks for that very thought-provoking insight, Gregsamsa! I'm going to try to see if i can find some of that on the internet to get a better idea.


message 27: by Derek (new)

Derek (derek_broughton) Paul wrote: "I plucked up the nerve to buy The Tunnel by William Gass and I'm reading it one page at a time."

I shudder to think how much trouble you'd have with it if you read it TWO pages at a time...


message 28: by Derek (new)

Derek (derek_broughton) Gregsamsa wrote: "She pointed out subtle ways men intimidate women, as well as how they are insensitive to security issues that men give no thought to, from ill-lit parking lots to being asked to say your address out loud at the DMV. "

Yeah, I always thought she got a bum rap. [that doesn't show my age, does it?] I mostly agree with her, but she did like to be confrontational...


message 29: by Traveller (new)

Traveller (moontravlr) | 2522 comments Mod
Maybe we usually too timid women needed someone like her to fight our battles for us.


message 30: by Saski (new)

Saski (sissah) | 399 comments Traveller wrote: "Maybe we usually too timid women needed someone like her to fight our battles for us."

Or learn from her to fight our own.


message 31: by Paul (last edited Jan 31, 2015 06:24AM) (new)

Paul Bryant I read Ice and Fire some years ago and gave it the usual one star review here

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

A woman called Andrea Dworkin
Was upset at what men were gawkin'
"Intercourse is too rife
But with my Swiss Army knife
I'll make sure there'll be no further porkin'!"


Well, best I could do at short notice.


message 32: by Traveller (new)

Traveller (moontravlr) | 2522 comments Mod
Paul wrote: "I read Ice and Fire some years ago and gave it the usual one star review here

A woman called Andrea Dworkin
Was upset at what men were gawkin'
"Inter..."


*giggles* Naughty Paul. If I was a man I would run! Well, maybe I would just run anyway. :P


message 33: by Ken (new)

Ken (kanthr) | 21 comments I have a huge pile of books on my nightstand.

Currently reading Joshua Slocum's memoir Sailing Alone Around The World. I find it fascinating what kind of climate encourages a person to do this, and what perseverance it takes to endure it. The introspective journey, superimposed on the tangible journey across trackless Ocean. Early on, Slocum informs the reader that his two most frequent companions for conversation are the Moon and his cabin full of books.


message 34: by Traveller (last edited Feb 10, 2015 10:29AM) (new)

Traveller (moontravlr) | 2522 comments Mod
Kenneth wrote: "I have a huge pile of books on my nightstand.

Currently reading Joshua Slocum's memoir Sailing Alone Around The World. I find it fascinating what kind of climate encourages a person to do this, an..."


Sounds interesting. Is a sort of race against time, or can he stop along the way and visit?

I'm currently reading two novels: Besides the group read of In the Night Garden, a sort of po-mo mix of fantasy which is turning out to be better than I had expected, I am reading Wide Sargasso Sea which is heart-wrenching.


message 35: by Ken (new)

Ken (kanthr) | 21 comments It wasn't a race against time, though those also interest me. There have been some very daring attempts (and some half-baked ones) by solo teen sailors in recent years. Laura Dekker's is probably the best.

What's impressive about Slocum is that he was really the first to do it. In 1895, Slocum left Boston in a sloop he restored from rot in a field. Without any aid whatsoever, he sailed West around the world alone successfully.

From Wikipedia:
Slocum navigated without a chronometer, instead relying on the traditional method of dead reckoning for longitude, which required only a cheap tin clock for approximate time, and noon-sun sights for latitude. On one long passage in the Pacific, Slocum also famously shot a lunar distance observation, decades after these observations had ceased to be commonly employed, which allowed him to check his longitude independently. However, Slocum's primary method for finding longitude was still dead reckoning; he recorded only one lunar observation during the entire circumnavigation.

46,000 miles, albeit with resupply stops. In the whole event, Slocum did all repair and resupply himself.

In 1910, during one of his voyages, he disappeared without a trace.


message 36: by Traveller (new)

Traveller (moontravlr) | 2522 comments Mod
Kenneth wrote: "What's impressive about Slocum is that he was really the first to do it. In 1895, Slocum left Boston in a sloop he restored from rot in a field. Without any aid whatsoever, he sailed West around the world alone successfully. [...]
In 1910, during one of his voyages, he disappeared without a trace.
"

Now that is fascinating in so many ways. The time period not the least of it. He must have been an extremely competent man.
...and him disappearing without trace feels like one of those mysteries that tickle your imagination for possibly eternity. Talking of mysteries, at least they've now finally found out who Jack the Ripper really was.


message 37: by Derek (new)

Derek (derek_broughton) Kenneth wrote: "What's impressive about Slocum is that he was ..."

Nova Scotian! How could you miss mentioning that Kenneth? :-)


message 38: by Ken (new)

Ken (kanthr) | 21 comments Can't give away everything now can I? :)

He also had a number of exploits before his circumnavigation.


message 39: by Sumant (new)

Sumant Here is my review of Heroes die.


message 40: by [deleted user] (new)

I want to read Dirt Music by Tim Winton. I have made several attempts at it already and it has always struck me as beautifully written but dull. If I do read this book, it will be because I have broken my own policy of death before a boring book.


message 41: by Traveller (last edited Oct 20, 2015 04:36AM) (new)

Traveller (moontravlr) | 2522 comments Mod
Death before a boring book!~ I like that. I'm very bad that way. I abandon books when I feel I'd rather be cutting my toenails than continuing with it.

There are other books that I abandon because they simply seem to big and daunting. The following are in this list:

- American Gods by Neil Gaiman

- Ulysses by James Joyce

- À la recherche du temps perdu / In Search of Lost
Time In Search of Lost Time (À la recherche du temps perdu #1-7) by Marcel Proust
by Marcel Proust

- Gravity's Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon

I'd better finish The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner before I have to add it to this list. It's not big, it's just... rather confusing at the start.


message 42: by Saski (new)

Saski (sissah) | 399 comments Ah, American Gods! I am sooo looking forward to reading that with you all. Been meaning to do something by Pynchon. I am passing on Ulysses, though I did manage The Dubliners. Does that get me off the hook?


message 43: by Traveller (new)

Traveller (moontravlr) | 2522 comments Mod
We could always do a Joyce POLL and a Pynchon POLL . :P Ha ha.


message 44: by Traveller (new)

Traveller (moontravlr) | 2522 comments Mod
Ruth wrote: " I am passing on Ulysses, though I did manage The Dubliners. Does that get me off ..."

That's a bit like asking: "Does having read Neverwhere get me off the hook from reading American Gods?" Heheheheh, sorry Ruth! XD


message 45: by Saski (new)

Saski (sissah) | 399 comments Hahaha! Very good!


message 46: by Traveller (last edited Oct 20, 2015 06:51AM) (new)

Traveller (moontravlr) | 2522 comments Mod
Sorry, Ruth, I just could not resist, and can you really blame me? :) I hope we are still friends. XD
Never fear, you will get me to read AG still, I promise.
If we had not done it by May/June next year yet, you can refer me back to this post of mine (post 46) in which I:
"solemnly promise that I will read American Gods with Ruth/the group before August 2016." That sound fair? :P


message 47: by Saski (new)

Saski (sissah) | 399 comments Silly, of course!

Let's see, (setting a reminder) okay, I'm holding you to that!

:D


message 48: by [deleted user] (new)

It is definitely shameful that I have not read any Homer or Milton. Also, Don Quixote and Moby Dick tired me out.


message 49: by Saski (new)

Saski (sissah) | 399 comments Greg wrote: "It is definitely shameful that I have not read any Homer or Milton. Also, Don Quixote and Moby Dick tired me out."

Tried both DQ and MD. Failed miserably :( Not sure I want to risk failing again. ...


message 50: by Traveller (new)

Traveller (moontravlr) | 2522 comments Mod
I have read some Homer, and some Milton, but I never finished Paradise Lost, despite having had to read it for some course at some point in my life. :P
Don Quixote's size always scares me off, and I love whales too much to be reading about whaling... :P


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