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ART - ARCHITECTURE - CULTURE > BOOKS AND OTHER WORKS CITED BY BARZUN

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message 1: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 37385 comments Mod
This will be the thread to add books and other works cited by Barzun.

From Dawn to Decadence 500 Years of Western Cultural Life 1500 to the Present by Jacques Barzun


message 2: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 37385 comments Mod
Page 715:

TS Eliot's The Waste Land:

The Waste Land (Critical Edition) by T.S. Eliot

Author: TS Eliot:

T.S. Eliot

T.S. Eliot


message 3: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 37385 comments Mod
Page 715:

James Joyce's Ulysses:

Ulysses by James Joyce

Author: James Joyce

James Joyce

James Joyce


message 4: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 37385 comments Mod
Page 715:

Childe Harold by Lord Byron:

The following edition includes Childe Harold:

Lord Byron The Major Works (Oxford World's Classics) by George Gordon Byron

Author: George Gordon Byron (Lord Byron)

George Gordon Byron

George Gordon Byron


message 5: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 37385 comments Mod
Page 715:

Faust by Goethe

Faust I & II (Goethe The Collected Works, Vol 2) by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Author: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe


message 6: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments From "The West Torn Apart":

page 5: While discussing the spreading of the Bible, Barzun says "The book to browse in is: The Coming of the Book by Lucien Febvre and Jean Martin."

The Coming of the Book Impact of Printing, 1450-1800 (Verso Modern Classics) by Lucien Febvre

page 13: While discussing Erasmus, "The book to read is James Anthony Froude's Life and Letters of Erasmus."

Life and Letters of Erasmus by James Anthony Froude

page 16: While discussing Luther's Table Talk, Barzun says, "A good version to read is that edited by Preserved Smith." The only Table Talk by Martin Luther than I can find on goodreads isn't the Smith translation. I found a Smith book about Luther, however, that may or may not be what Barzun is referring to.

The Table Talk of Martin Luther by Martin Luther The Life And Letters Of Martin Luther by Preserved Smith


message 7: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments From "The New Life":

page 30: Barzun refers to a book by Dorothy Sayers to help understand some of Luther's beliefs. He says, "The book to read--hers--is The Mind of the Maker."

The Mind of the Maker by Dorothy L. Sayers


message 8: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments From "The Good Letters":

page 56: To help understand the thought of the times, Barzun says, "The book to read is Renaissance Thought by Paul Oskar Kristeller." Several goodreads books may be the one he was referring to.

Renaissance Thought The Classic, Scholastic & Humanistic Strains by Paul Oskar Kristeller Renaissance Thought and the Arts by Paul Oskar Kristeller Renaissance Thought and its Sources by Paul Oskar Kristeller


message 9: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments From "The 'Artist' Is Born":

page 67: Barzun recommends reading Leonardo DaVinci's Notebooks.

The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci (vols. 1 & 2) by Leonardo da Vinci

page 75: While discussing the evolution of the word 'artist' from indicating a craftsman into today's definition, Barzun says, "The book to read is Artist and Craftsman by H. Ruhemann."

Couldn't find it in the goodreads database. But it was for sale as a used book on amazon: Artist and Craftsman.

page 76: Describing how an artist may write about his experiences, Barzun says, "The book to browse in is Cellini's autobiography."

Life of Benvenuto Cellini by Cellini, Benvenuto

page 77: While discussing how artists often remain hands-on, Barzun says, "The book to browse in is The Artist's Handbook by Ralph Mayer."

The Artist's Handbook of Materials and Techniques 2Third Edition by Ralph Mayer

page 80: While talking about artists traveling, and how they were received, Barzun says, "The travel book to read is Montaigne's Diary of 1580-81."

Again, didn't find it in goodread's database. Here's an amazon link: Diary of Montaigne's Journey to Italy in 1580-1581.

page 81: While discussing the micro-society of artists, Barzun says, "The book to read is The Marriage of Fiagro--Beaumarchais' play, not Da Ponte's opera libretto."

Le Mariage de Figaro (Classiques Hachette) by Pierre De Beaumarchais

page 86: While discussing powerful women, Barzun mentions Catherine and says, "The book to read is Balzac's semi-fictional Catherine de Medicis."

Catherine De' Medici by Honoré de Balzac

Especially on the foreign (to me) language books, I hope I am getting the right editions. If anyone has any reason to correct me, feel free!


message 10: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Oct 04, 2009 04:09PM) (new)

Bentley | 37385 comments Mod
Elizabeth, thank you for starting to add these books to this section.

I found this which may be the version Barzun is talking about of Luther's Table Talk - it looks like Preserved Smith was at Columbia, This was on google.

http://books.google.com/books?id=OybL...

I found this entry on Barnes and Noble:

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Luth...

However, I also found some FREE DIGITAL EBOOKS (offered by Barnes and Noble) which are free downloads (Preserved Smith)

Luther's table talk: a critical study

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Luth...

Conversations with Luther : Selections from Recently Published Sources of the Table Talk by Martin Luther, Preserved Smith, Herbert Percival
Gallinger

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Conv...

Looks similar to above but with a cover: still free; looks the same

Conversations with Luther: Selections from Recently Published Sources of the Table Talk by Martin Luther, Preserved Smith, Herbert Percival Gallinger

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Conv...

An 1857 version:

The table talk of Martin Luther
by Martin Luther, William Hazlitt, Alexander Chalmers
= not Smith but still free

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/The-...

Martin Luther

Martin Luther

Preserved Smith


message 11: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Oct 04, 2009 04:47PM) (new)

Bentley | 37385 comments Mod
If one wants to browse the following book; it is on google:

The Coming of the Book by Lucien Febvre and Jean Martin.

http://books.google.com/books?id=9opx...


Lucien Febvre

Found this on google:

James Anthony Froude's Life and Letters of Erasmus

http://books.google.com/books?id=5tB4...


James Anthony Froude

Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus

Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus


message 12: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 37385 comments Mod
Elizabeth, you are doing great...I think some of the books referenced by Barzun may be hard to come by aside from the classics. Glad to have found some on them in google.


message 13: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments Bentley wrote: "Elizabeth, you are doing great...I think some of the books referenced by Barzun may be hard to come by aside from the classics. Glad to have found some on them in google."

You found some good stuff. I like the free digital ebooks. Especially for old, out-of-print books it is nice to not have to pay a bundle to get a hold of a copy.


message 14: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 37385 comments Mod
That is what I was thinking. I haven't had a chance to check out the others ; but was impressed that Barnes and Noble offered them free.


message 15: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments From "Cross Section: Madrid":

page 93: While discussing Charles V, Barzun says, "the book to read is Through Spain with Don Quixote by Rupert Croft-Cooke."

page 94: While discussing bull fighting, Barzun says, "The book to read is Wars of Ideas in Spain by Jose Castillejo."

page 99: While discussing preparations for Columbus' famous journey, Barzun says, "The book to read is Christopher Columbus, Mariner, by Samuel Eliot Morison." Christopher Columbus, Mariner

page 103: While talking about travel, Barzun says, "The essay to read is English Maritime Writing from Hakluyt to Cook, by Oliver Warner." Couldn't find the essay, but this is probably the author: Oliver Warner

page 103: While talking about one of the earliest travel books, Barzun says, "For an amusing description of the work, read Dorothy Sayers' short story 'The Adventure of Uncle Meleager's Will.'"

page 105: In describing war formations and lances, Barzun says, "For a vivid impression of the lancer, look at Velazquez's painting of 'The Surrender at Breda.'" Interestingly, wikipedia says it should be The Surrender OF Breda. Wonder if the "at" is a typo.

page 106: In discussing Spanish history after the Spanish-American war, Barzun says, "The book to read is Invertebrate Spain by Jose Ortega y Gasset."

España invertebrada by José Ortega y Gasset

page 108: While talking about the English going through a Anglo-Saxonism phase that united them with Germany, Barzun says, "The brief book to read is Racial Myth in English History by Hugh A. MacDougal." Racial Myth in English History

page 111: In discussing international law issues, Barzun says, "The book to read is Peace Games by Theodore Caplow." Peace Games

page 111: Introducing the new genre of novel writing, Barzun mentions La Vida de Lazarillo de Tormes, which was anonymously written, and says, "The translation to read is that by W. S. Merwin."

This is a different translation: La Vida Del Lazarillo De Tormes/ the Lazarillo De Tormes Live (Clasicos Universales) by Mestas Ediciones

page 114: In discussing the adding of family names to a person's designation, Barzun says, "The book to read is: Is Thy Name Wart? by James Pennethorne Hughes."

Note: (Lots of books in this chapter!) For books not easily found on goodreads, I decided to not add a link for now. If someone would like to post a good link from somewhere else, please do.


message 16: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments From "The Eutopians":

page 122: While discussing the alleged murders of Richard III, Barzun says, "The book to read is Josephine Tey's fictional account, The Daughter of Time; and for the present state of the case, Richard III, by Charles Ross."

[image error]

Richard III by Charles Ross

page 133: While discussing Rabelais, Barzun says, "The book to read is A Journey Into Rabelais' France by Albert Jay Nock."

A Journey Into Rabelais's France by Albert Jay Nock

page 140: While watching the influence of Montaigne on Shakespeare's plays, Barzun says, "The book to read is Shakespeare and Montaigne, by Jacob Feis, a hostile work that blames the latter for perverting the former's mind."

Shakspere and Montaigne by Jacob Feis


message 17: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 37385 comments Mod
Thank you so much Elizabeth with helping out with your notes. Great job so far.


message 18: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments From "Epic & Comic, Lyric & Music, Critic & Public":

page 152: While discussing the meaning of 'epic', Barzun says, "The book to read is W. P. Ker's Epic and Romance."

Epic and Romance Essays on Medieval Literature

page 154: Describing Camoens as Portugal's greatest lyric poet, Barzun says, "The [translation of Os Lusiadas:] to read is Leonard Bacon's, in verse."

Os Lusiadas (The Lusiads) by Luís de Camões Lusiads of Luiz De Camoes by Leonard Bacon

page 161: While discussing Renaissance music, Barzun says, "For the amateur musician the practical guide to read is The English Madrigal School by Edmund H. Fellows."

The English Madrigal School

page 162: While discussing poets, Barzun says, "The book to read is the anthology, The English Poets, Volume II:Marlowe to Marvell, edited by W. H. Auden and Norman Holmes Pearson."

This is the closest I could quickly find on goodreads: The Portable Elizabethan Poets Elizabethan & Jacobean Poets Marlowe to Marvell

page 164: Still in the poetry section, Barzun references himself, "The Book to read is An Essay on French Verse for Readers of English Poetry by Jacques Barzun."

Essay on French Verse For Readers of English Poetry by Jacques Barzun

page 167: While discussing the first modern critics, Barzun says, "The book to read is Literary Criticism in the Renaissance by J. E. Spingarn."

History of Literary Criticism in the Renaissance


message 19: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments Wow, there are a lot of these recommended readings. I'm sure I missed marking a few when I was originally reading From Dawn to Decadence, but I think I marked almost all. Feel free to correct me on any, especially the links. It is funny how often I can find a similar title, but not the exact title.


message 20: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 37385 comments Mod
I was thinking the same thing Elizabeth...keep up the great work. This is like a lifelong reading program (set up for us by Barzun).


message 21: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments From "The View from Venice Around 1650":

page 172: While discussing ambassadors from Venice, Barzun says, "The book to read is Diplomacy by Harold Nicolson."

Diplomacy by Harold Nicolson

page 188: Barzun describes some indoor entertainment based on a classical myth or moral love story. He says, "The sample to read is Milton's 'Comus.'"

Milton's Comus by John Milton


message 22: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments From "The Invisible College":

page 192: While discussing the value of 16C science, Barzun says the "best short account of the growth of modern science, by H. T. Pledge, is called Science Since 1500."

page 196: While discussing alchemy and astrology in the lives of now-famous scientists, Barzun says, "The book to read is The Alchemist by F. Sherwood Taylor."

The Alchemists by F.Sherwood Taylor

page 205: While discussing the value of discovering new scientific instruments, specifically aids to navigation, Barzun says, "The book to read is Longitude by Dava Sobel."

Longitude The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of his Time by Dava Sobel

page 222: While discussing Robert Burton, "the first systematic psychiatrist," Barzun says, "The book to read is The Psychiatry of Robert Burton by Bergen Evans."

The psychiatry of Robert Burton,

page 227: Barzun mentions that other travelers preceded Marco Polo to the East and wrote their accounts, then says, "The book that reprints them in translation is: The Contemporaries of Marco Polo, ed. Manuel Komroff."

[image error]

page 229: Barzun briefly describes town life, then says, "For greater detail, read The Medieval Town by John H. Mundy and Peter Riesenberg."

The Medieval Town

More from this chapter later...


message 23: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 37385 comments Mod
You are doing a great job Elizabeth...thank you for everything so far..keep up the great work. We are almost following Barzun's lifelong learning process with these recommendations.


message 24: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments A little bit at a time. Life is often lived in 5 minute increments, particularly when you have small children. Actually, that is part of what has been hard with Barzun. It is hard to even reply to someone else's comment with less than five minutes of pondering available. Hmmm, another point to ponder.


message 25: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 37385 comments Mod
I think Barzun was the toughest selection to have a discussion on. It takes five minutes to even contemplate how to integrate everything that Barzun has introduced.


message 26: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments From "The Invisible College", cont:

page 230: While discussing the use of machinery, Barzun says, "The book to read is The Medieval Machine by Jean Gimpel."
Medieval Machine The Industrial Revolution of the Middle Ages by Jean Gimpel

page 231: While discussing small artifacts of art, Barzun says, "The book to read is The Fate of Medieval Art by G. G. Coulton."

page 231: While discussing clocks and watches, Barzun says, "The book to consult is A Revolution in Time by David S. Landes."
Revolution in Time Clocks and the Making of the Modern World, Revised and Enlarged Edition by David S. Landes

page 231: While discussing literature, poetry, and musical texts in the Middle Ages, Barzun says, "A selection to read is in Medieval Latin Lyrics, translated by Helen Waddell."
Medieval Latin Lyrics by Brian Stock is probably not the same thing Barzun mentions.

page 232: Barzun says, "The book to read for the lives of outstanding figures, including two women is Medieval lives by Norman Cantor."
Medieval Lives by Norman F. Cantor

page 232: In discussing medieval entertainment that mocks both male and female roles, Barzaun says, "The book to read is The Fifteen Joys of Marriage, translated by Richard Aldington."

page 233: While discussing courtly love, Barzun says, "The anthology to read is Medieval Lyrics of Europe, translated by Willard R. Trask."
Medieval Lyrics of Europe


message 27: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 37385 comments Mod
I wonder how many entries/recommendations Barzun actually made?


message 28: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments We should have had a contest where everyone guesses how many before reading the book.

I'm basically just entering in the ones that were in brackets. As you've noticed, he made many recommendations without the brackets. And many references, both specific and general. I wonder if even Barzun could make a list of everything!


message 29: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 37385 comments Mod
That is funny. Yes, he did. Since you are going by page number; it will make it a lot easier to find the others.

His brain must be the size of a planet. This is how much you know in a lifelong quest for learning if you are as intelligent a man as Jacques Barzun.


message 30: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments From "The Monarchs' Revolution":

none!


message 31: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments From "Puritans as Democrats":

page 280: While explaining the purpose of sleeping together with clothes on before marriage to conserve fuel (i.e. bundling), Barzun says, "The book to read is Bundling by Henry Reed Stiles."
Bundling Its Origin, Progress and Decline by Henry Reed Stiles


message 32: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments From "The Reign of Etiquette":

None. At least none that I marked and found.


message 33: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments From "The View from London Around 1715":

page 314: While discussing the Frenchman Vauban, Barzun says, "The book for layman to read is Tristram Shandy by Laurence Sterne. Readers keen on technicalities will enjoy the text and plates of The Fortress in the Age of Vauban and Frederick the Great by Christopher Duffy."
The first could be either The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman The Florida Edition (Penguin Classics) by Laurence Sterne or Tristram Shandy and A Sentimental Journey (Modern Library) by Laurence Sterne or both. The second is The Fortress in the Age of Vauban and Frederick the Great, 1680-1789.

page 325: While discussing Swift (aka Jonathan Swift, I agree it is annoying that Barzun is on a comfortable, last-name basis with all notable historical figures), Barzun says, "The poem to read is his apologia, 'On the Death of Dr. Swift.'"
May be included in Gulliver's Travels and Other Writings (Bantam Classics) by Jonathan Swift.


message 34: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments From "The Opulent Eye":

page 335: While discussing Peter Paul Rubens, Barzun says, "For an idea of the painter's range, leaf through the color plates in Rubens by Charles Scribner III--and even read the text."
Perhaps this one: Masters of Art Rubens (Masters of Art) by Charles Scribner Jr.

page 336: While discussing the sculptor Bernini, Barzun says, "The book to leaf through and read is Bernini, also by Charles Scribner III."
If the last one is correct, this one probably is too: Masters of Art Bernini (Masters of Art Series) by Charles Scribner Jr. Although goodreads has the author of both books as "Charles Scribner, Jr."

page 341: While discussing the rules that constrained poets, Barzun says, "For a summary of the constraints, look into An Essay on French Verse cited."
An Essay on French Verse For Readers of English Poetry by Jacques Barzun

page 346: While describing La Fontaine's fables, Barzun says, "The translations of the fables to read are those by Norman Shapiro, not Marianne Moore's, which give the sense without the conciseness."
Not either translator: The Fox, the Wolf and the Horse, and 17 More Fables (Book & Audio CD in Russian language) by La Fontaine

page 351: While discussing women as "arbiters of tase and the judges of comportment," Barzun says, "The book to read is The Lady by Emily James Putnam.
The Lady

page 351: While discussing manners and etiquette, Barzun says, "The book to read is Good Behavior by Harold Nicolson.
Good Behavior Being a Study of Certain Types of Civility by Harold Nicolson

page 354: While discussing languages, specifically German, and the advent of prose, Barzun says, "The little book to read is German Style (with annotated examples) by Ludwig Lewisohn."
German Style An Introduction to the Study of German Prose by Ludwig Lewisohn

page 354: While discussing the translation of the King James Version of the Bible, Barzun says, "The book to read is Translating For King James (a participant's notes) edited by Ward Allen."
Perhaps The Coming of the King James Gospels A Collation of the Translators' Work-In-Progress or Translating the New Testament Epistles 1604-1611 A manuscript from King James's Westminster Company

page 356: While discussing the rise of French as the second language of educated Europeans, Barzun says, "The account to read is Comedy and Conscience After the Restoration, chapters 1-4, by Joseph Wood Krutch.
Comedy and Conscience After the Restoration

Phew! Another big chapter.


message 35: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 37385 comments Mod
Very large..amazing number of recommendations.


message 36: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments From "The Encyclopedic Century":

page 367: While discussing George Berkeley's "flash of inspiration" regarding matter, Barzun says, "The work to read, short and delightful, is Berkeley's Commonplace Book, which details the birth and growth of his thought."
George Berkeley's Commonplace Book

page 376: While the challenge to build a clock accurage enough to help with navigation, Barzun says, "The book to read is Longitude by Dava Sobel (Penguin ed.)."
Longitude by Dava Sobel Note: This is Barzun's second reference to this book. Maybe really worth looking into. I wonder why he specified a particular edition this time.

page 377: While discussing the chemist Lavoisier, Barzun says, "The book to leaf through for illustrations of 18C laboratory work in all fields is The Album of Science: Leonardo to Lavoisier, ed. by I. Bernard Cohen."
Album of Science From Leonardo to Lavoisier, 1450-1800

page 378: While discussing a tragic earthquake in Lisbon, Barzun says, "Worth reading is the translation of the main parts of 'The Lisbon Earthquake' by Anthony Hecht."



message 37: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments From "Cross Section: Weimar":

page 407: While discussing American political thought, Barzun says, "One thinks at once of The Federalist."
The Federalist Papers (Signet Classics) by Alexander Hamilton

page 410: While discussing Horace Walpole and the first gothic novel, Barzun says, "The book to read is the Selected Letters of Horace Walpole in the Everyman Library Edition."
Horace Walpole and His World Select Passages from His Letters by Horace Walpole

page 410: While introducing the sentimental novel, Barzun says, "The book to read is Before Jane Austen by Harrison Ross Steeves."
Before Jane Austen

page 411: While discussing Boswell's biography of Dr. Johnson, Barzun says, "The book to read is Samuel Johnson by Joseph Wood Krutch."
Samuel Johnson

page 413: While discussing Johnson's prejudices and journeys, Barzun says, "The book to read is his own Journey to the Western Isles of Scotland."
Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland

page 420: While discussing the "character of the late 18C orchestra," Barzun says, "The book to browse in is The Orchestra, ed. by Joan Peyser."
The Orchestra A Collection of 23 Essays on Its Origins and Transformations by Joan Peyser

page 422: Barzun lists several "publications of note in intellectual history." Namely, "Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire and Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations... Robertson's History of America... Jeremy Bentham's Principles of Legislation... and Hume's Dialogues on Natural Religion."
The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (Abridged) by Edward Gibbon The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith The Principles of Morals and Legislation (Great Books in Philosophy) by Jeremy Bentham Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion by David Hume
Couldn't find the Robertson book in goodreads, here is an amazon link: History of America


message 38: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Oct 10, 2009 01:51PM) (new)

Bentley | 37385 comments Mod
What a wealth of knowledge Barzun is tranferring to his readers. He must have been an excellent professor; I had the feeling while reading his book that he was still in teaching mode. Thank you Elizabeth for doing this. It is a big task.


message 39: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments From "The Forgotten Troop":

page 426: While discussing the American Revolution and the French Revolution, Barzun says, "The book to read is Understanding War by Peter Paret."
Understanding War Essays on Clausewitz and the History of Military Power by Peter Paret

page 430: After comparing the dethroning of Louis XVI to getting rid of Robespierre, Barzun says, "For a reminder of the events and fates of the participants, read The French Revolution by Charles Downer Hazen. It is so vivid a narrative that its two volumes seem shorter than many a treatment in one. For a more modern view: The French Revolution by George Goodwin. Carlyle's, in his special idiom, is picturesque and also important as the first account in English that was sympathetic without being partisan. Finally, the monumental Citizens, by Simon Schama, is a chronicle rich in fresh and evocative details."
Contemporary American Opinion Of The French Revolution by Charles D. Hazen French Revolution (University Library) by Albert Goodwin The French Revolution A History (Modern Library Classics) by Thomas Carlyle Citizens A Chronicle of the French Revolution by Simon Schama

page 437: While discussing Dupuytren and others who advanced medicine around the time of the French Revolution, Barzun says, "The book to read is Science and Medicine in France 1790-1855 by John E. Lesch."
Science and Medicine in France The Emergence of Experimental Physiology, 1790-1855

page 449: While discussing Restif and his aims for moral reform, and the decadence of the age, Barzun says, "The book to read is Paris Nights by Restif de la Bretonne."
The Nights of Paris

page 449: While discussing an "incredible yet real-life character, Vidocq," Barzun says, "The book to read is The Memoirs (probably ghost-written) in the one-volume English translation."
Memoirs of Vidocq Master of Crime (NABAT) by Francois Eugene Vidocq

page 458: While discussing Mary Wollstonecraft, Barzun mentions a number of her works: Vindication of the Rights of Women, her earlier A Vindication of the Rights of Men "to refute Burke's book on the French Revolution," and Thoughts on the Education of Daughters."
A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (Penguin Classics) by Mary Wollstonecraft A Vindication of the Rights of Men (Great Books in Philosophy) by Mary Wollstonecraft Thoughts on the Education of Daughters, 1787 (For Her Own Good A Series of Conduct Books) by Mary Wollstonecraft


message 40: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 37385 comments Mod
Some of these books are absolutely amazing. This is such a wonderful effort on your part Elizabeth. Thank you from me and the group. I really think that Barzun gave us more than a good read...he really tried to give us a broad education.


message 41: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments Thanks for the encouragement, Bentley. I think you are the one doing a fabulous job, reading everything and keeping everyone together.

The next time I read Barzun, I think I want to find a couple of people who want to take it slower, maybe 2-3 weeks on each chapter, so I can digest and think and comment and discuss before moving on to the next chapter. Plus have a better time line at my elbow. :) In the meantime, as you said, this is quite a list of recommended books. The amazing part is, Barzun probably really has read all of them!


message 42: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments From "The Work of Mind-and-Heart":

page 469: While discussing Romanticism and what one age may inherit from another, Barzun says, "The small book to read is Classic, Romantic, and Modern by Jacques Barzun."
Classic, Romantic, and Modern (Phoenix Books) by Jacques Barzun
(For a giggle, note that his "small" book is almost 300 pages. It's all relative.)

page 483: While discussing Sir Walter Scott, the historical novel, and others of Scott's works, Barzun says, "The book to consult is Walter Scott by Edgar Johnson."
Sir Walter Scott the great unknown

page 486: While dicussing Byron, Barzun says, "The book to read is The Letters of Byron, chosen to give an outline of his life and opinions, ed. by Jacques Barzun."



message 43: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 37385 comments Mod
Elizabeth S wrote: "Thanks for the encouragement, Bentley. I think you are the one doing a fabulous job, reading everything and keeping everyone together.

The next time I read Barzun, I think I want to find a couple..."


Yes, that is what I mean...I think by writing this when he was in his nineties..he was telling us what was out there which he considered the best on specific subjects....it is almost like we are not only reading his book but also having sidebars on ancillary subjects.

I am planning to read this again....and have left the archive open.




message 44: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments From "Cross Section: Paris":

page 496: While examining Berlioz' music style, Barzun says, "For a technical analysis, the book to read is The Berlioz Style by Brian Primmer."
The Berlioz Style

page 497: While discussing the cholera epidemic that swept Europe, Barzun says, "The book to read is King Cholera by Norman Longmate."

page 498: While describing the sudden fashion for seaside resorts, Barzun says, "The description to read is that in chapter 25 of Dickens's Pickwick Papers."
The Pickwick Papers (Penguin Classics) by Charles Dickens

page 498: While discussing dandies and (of course) Beau Brummell, Barzun says, "The book to read is The Dandy From Brummel to to Beerbohm, by Ellen Moers." (I think there is a typo in the book, and "Brumell" should have two l's both times.)
The Dandy Brummell to Beerbohm

page 498: While moving from the dandy to the gentleman, Barzun says, "The book to read is Good Behavior by Harold Nicolson."
Good Behavior Being a Study of Certain Types of Civility by Harold Nicolson

page 500: While discussing the shock of the waltz, Barzun says, "Byron wrote a short satirical poem, 'The Waltz' in 1812; Berlioz in 1830 was free to make the second movement of his Symphonie Fantastique a walz." Barzun then adds, "Read Byron and listen to Berlioz."

page 511: While discussing the critic Hazlitt and his essays, Barzun says, "A good group to begin with is the small collection entitled Winterslow, ed. by his grandson W. C. Hazlitt."

page 512: While still discussing Hazlitt, Barzun says, "The book to read on hazlitt in all his aspects is William Hazlitt by John Kinnaird."
William Hazlitt, Critic of Power


message 45: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 37385 comments Mod
More terrific books. Thank you Elizabeth.


message 46: by Elizabeth S (last edited Oct 18, 2009 06:49AM) (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments From "The Mother of Parliaments":

page 521: While discussing the restoring of the European balance of power after Napoleon, Barzun recommends, "The book to read is A World Restored: Europe After Napoleon by Henry A. Kissinger."
A World Restored (Weidenfeld & Nicolson 50 Years) by Henry Kissinger

page 530: While discussing Sydney Smith and other politics in England, Barzun says, "For an impression of the English voters in action soon after the Reform Bill, read an account of the Eatanswill election in Dickens's Pickwick Papers, chapter 13."
The Pickwick Papers (Penguin Classics) by Charles Dickens

page 534: At the end of his discussion of Sydney Smith, Barzun says, "For his life, the book to read is The Smith of Smiths by Hesketh Pearson; and for extracts from his writings and correspondence it is Selected Writings of Sydney Smith, ed. by W. H. Auden."
The Smith of Smiths Being the Life, Wit and Humour of Sydney Smith by Hesketh Pearson
Couldn't find the Auden book on goodreads.

page 543: While discussing the railroad, Barzun says, "The book to read is The Railway Revolution by L. T. C. Rolt."
George and Robert Stephenson The Railway Revolution

page 543: While discussing the architectural advent of railway stations, Barzun says, "The book to leaf through and read is The Railway Station by Carroll L. V. Meeks."
The Railroad Station An Architectural History by Carroll L. V. Meeks

page 548: While discussing revolts across Europe, Barzun says, "The book to read is 1848: The Story of a Year by Raymond Postgate."
Story of a Year, 1848


message 47: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments From "Things Ride Mankind":

page 559: While discussing Baudelaire and his poetic ability to raise disgust in his readers, Barzun says, "The book to read is The Horror of Life by Rogert L. Williams."
The Horror of Life

page 560: While discussing how authors were turning to depict realism rather than romanticism, Barzun says, "The book to read is the Realists by C. P. Snow."
The Realists

page 564: While discussing novelists using satire, Barzun says, "The venturesome reader might well begin with Nightmare Abbey [by Peacock:]."
Nightmare Abbey (1818) by Thomas Love Peacock

page 565: While discussing 19C theater, Barzun says, "The book to read is Melodrama by Wilson Disher, with illustrations."
Blood and Thunder: Mid-Victorian Melodrama and Its Origins

page 566: While discussing Courbet, the "new master" of the Realist school, Barzun says, "The book to look at and read is Courbet by Sarah Faunce."
Masters of Art Courbet (Masters of Art) by Sarah Faunce

page 571: While discussing Darwin, Evolution, and Natural Selection, Barzun says, "One small book to read is Darwin Retried by Norman Macbeth."
Darwin Retried

page 573: While discussing Matthew Arnold's efforts to cure culture, Barzun says, "The book to read is Victorian England: Portrait of an Age by G. M. Young."
Victorian England Portrait of an Age

page 579: While discussing the fictional beliefs of some that "race equals character," Barzun says, "The book to read is Race: A Study in Superstition by Jacques Barzun."
Race a Study in Superstition

page 580: When introducing Florence Nightingale, Barzun says, "Her story has so often been told--and so well told--that...". There is a reference note at that point that takes us to page 820, which cites Florence Nightingale by Cecil Woodham-Smith.
Florence Nightingale 1820-1910 (Biography & Memoirs) by Cecil Woodham-Smith

page 582: While discussing Walter Bagehot, Barzun mentions his The English Constitution and says "it is the book to read" because it "describes... reasons for the successful working of the induplicable English Parliament."
The English Constitution (Oxford World's Classics) by Walter Bagehot

page 583: While discussing women travelers, Barzun says, "The book to read is Unsuitable for Ladies: An Anthology, ed. by Jane Robinson. For nautical readers, a supplement is Seafaring Women by Linda Grant."
Unsuitable for Ladies An Anthology of Women Travellers by Jane Robinson Seafaring Women by Linda Grant De Pauw


message 48: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments From "Cross Section: Chicago":

page 596: While discussing Finley Peter Dunne and his Mr. Dooley character, a Chicago saloonkeeper who comments on political events in Irish brogue, Barzun says, "The collection to start with is the first, dated 1898: Mr. Dooley in Peace and in War."
Mr. Dooley in Peace and in War by Finley Peter Dunne

page 598: While discussing the advent of novelties such as the telephone, the bicycle, and pesticide DDT, Barzun says, "One book to read among others is The Bicycle by R. John Way."
The bicycle; a guide & manual,

page 602: While discussing the beginning of placards and billboards for advertising, Barzun says, "The book to look through is Scrapbook of Early Advertising Art by Floyd Clymer."

page 603: While discussing how modern conveniences actual reduce free-time, Barzun recommends the book of a Swedish author. Barzun says, "His book, brief and non-technical until the last chapter is: The Harried Leisure Class by Steffan Linder."
The Harried Leisure Class

page 609: While discussing science and teaching children in schools, Barzun says, "The book to read is Science and Hypothesis by Henri Poincare."
Science and Hypothesis by Jules Henri Poincaré


message 49: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments From "A Summit of Energies":

page 631: While discussing the common arguments between Left and Right, Barzun says, "The book to read is Nineteenth-Century Opinion, an anthology of extracts, 1877-1901, ed. Michael Goodwin."
Nineteenth-century Opinion An Anthology of Extracts from the First Fifty Volumes of the "Nineteenth Century" , 1877-1901

page 632: While discussing how many scientific discoveries changed thought in the late 19C, Barzun says, "The book to leaf through is Album of Science: The 19th Century by L. Pierce Williams."
Album of Science - the Nineteenth Century


message 50: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2031 comments From "The Cubist Decade":

page 644: Barzun says, "Still worth reading, George Moore's Modern Painting gives in a series of short articles a contemporary's view of the transition from Corot to Monet."
Modern Painting by George Moore

page 651: While discussing how artist used to cross the borders of Europe freely before WWI, Barzun says, "The book to read is The World of Yesterday by Stefan Zweig."
The World of Yesterday by Stefan Zweig

page 662: While discussing Alfred Adler and his post-Freud contributions, Barzun says, "The book to read is In Freud's Shadow by Paul E. Stepansky."
In Freud's Shadow Adler in Context by Paul E. Stepansky

page 671: While discussing Nietzsche, Barzun says, "The book to read is What Nietzsche Means by George Allen Morgan."
What Nietzsche Means.

page 672: While discussing Tolstoy, Barzun says, "The essay to read is his diatribe What is Art?"
What Is Art? by Leo Tolstoy

page 675: While discussing the stage in the Cubist decade, Barzun says, "The book to read is The Playwright as Thinker by Eric Bentley."
The Playwright as Thinker A Study of Drama in Modern Times by Eric Bentley

page 678: While discussing Debussy and music and the comments on Debussy made by "a later composer and music historian," Barzun says, "His book, recommended for reading, is Music Ho! by Constant Lambert."
Music Ho


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Books mentioned in this topic

From Dawn to Decadence: 500 Years of Western Cultural Life, 1500 to the Present (other topics)
The Waste Land (other topics)
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Authors mentioned in this topic

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James Joyce (other topics)
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