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Who is Behemoth?

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message 1: by Cagne (last edited Jan 29, 2015 07:49AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Cagne Wasn't the cat called Behemoth? Azazello is the guy with the fang and the eye albugo:

"At the far side, the steel of his armour glittering, flew Azazello. The moon also changed his face. The absurd, ugly fang disappeared without a trace, and the albugo on his eye proved false. Azazello’s eyes were both the same, empty and black, and his face was white and cold. Now Azazello flew in his true form, as the demon of the waterless desert, the killer-demon."
(From the Pevear/Volokhonsky translation.)


ProfX I'm not sure if he represents Stalin, though it's an interesting thought. I took him more as a manifestation of Woland's dark humor, how humor can be used to subvert any idea or system, be it good or evil. Behemoth was clearly with Woland, yet he often seemd to mock Woland and the other members of his entourage. In a sense Behemoth undermined Woland as much as he did anything else.

As a side note, Behemoth gives what has become my favorite reply when someone calls you out on a mistake or lie, "history will be the judge."


message 3: by Chris (last edited Apr 08, 2018 03:02PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Chris Bronson He is a knight, who once made a bon mot that was not entirely satisfactory. And thus damned. Hence his clownish antics


Natalia Chris wrote: "He is a knight, who once made a bon mot that was not entirely satisfactory. And thus damned. Hence his clownish antics"

It is Koroviev-Fagot who was a knight who had made an unfortunate joke about light and darkness and was paying for it ever since.
Behemoth - Cagne was right - is a demonic black cat who can turn into a man. At the end, as far as I remember, when everyone was transformed into their true form, it was said that he was a demon-page, the best jester in the world.
The character was inspired by the demon from 'The History of the relation of Man with the Devil', the devil of the desires of the stomach and Bulgakov's cat Flyushka.


Chris Bronson Natalia wrote: "Chris wrote: "He is a knight, who once made a bon mot that was not entirely satisfactory. And thus damned. Hence his clownish antics"

It is Koroviev-Fagot who was a knight who had made an unfortun..."


Ah, I stand corrected. I love the idea of being damned for a less-than-witty joke. No novel combines satire, absurdity, and a certain of hope as well as Bulgakov.


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