The Fault in Our Stars The Fault in Our Stars discussion


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Anybody else think the romance is shallow, the emotion is nonexistent in this book and the message is one of hopelessness?

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hannah renee. I know I'm gonna upset some faulties by saying this; but I just don't feel the chemistry. The love is shallow. If it could be called love.

Also, where's the emotion???? The book was so full of witty crap that it failed to give me the emotional vibe of the book. I had no emotional attachment to the characters due to this. For me, if a book is full of raw emotion, such as Harry Potter or the Hunger Games (especially Mockingjay) I not only get attached to the characters, but I get attached to the story. Also, I have to say that I was left with a feeling of hopelessness in this book. Harry Potter and Mockingjay gives you a sense that life does go on and there is hope even if there is death (even a metaphorical death like in Katniss's and Peeta's case; they died to the people they were) there is still hope... it doesn't just end. There IS something at the end.


Julia I completely agree. I felt the exact same way. Romance novels aren't my preference to begin with, so this book just confirmed that for me.
Although wittiness is such fun for me, it just doesn't mix with romance, at least that much. This book didn't make me feel anything special, I felt like the ending was bland and there was nothing to move forward with. As a result, it feels like a waste of time. I'm John Green is capable of writing much better, moving novels that connect with people, but this one just didn't cut it.


Kass In my humble opinion, I feel that "romance" per say wasn't the whole point of the book. Don't get me wrong, I don't believe it is cancer that is the point, but I feel that what John Green was trying to portray in this work was two- more or less- tortured souls bonding. Kindred spirits coming together in the face of hopelessness. I don't feel like comparing it to other books does it justice; John Green is his own author with his own voice, and I believe he did a beautiful job expressing that voice. I also disagree with the fact about the ending being "bland". I'm not basing this on the fact that Augustus dies and it made me cry, but this part of John Green's message was to express how unpredictable life is no matter how cruel it has already been or how good your intentions are. Touching the point of "nothing to move forward with," answer this question: what is there to move forward with in life after death? It wasn't a story meant to go on, but to, as Hazel points out so poignantly, "die with us". Perhaps John is saying here that we don't need to think of or wish for the story to continue, but we must think of the elegance and beauty of story when it happened. John Green was trying to be more realistic with this novel because in reality, life DOESN'T go on. It will, inevitably, end. I am in no way trying to offend anyone who doesn't share my views, but I think those who feel that there is a "shallow romance" in the novel perhaps didn't read it deeply enough.


Lindsey Nathan o'connor As a cancer survivor, I think Green did a great job capturing what a cancer patient goes through medically and with relationships. I used (and still do) humor to accept the scariness of cancer and the ongoing fears you live with as a survivor. I didn't focus so much on the romance in this book, rather that life can be short even for young people. Augustus and Hazel were able to connect at a new level. So Kass I'm with you on your perception of this book.


Kass Congrats on kicking cancer to the curb, Lindsey!!!! :D


hannah renee. Kass wrote: "In my humble opinion, I feel that "romance" per say wasn't the whole point of the book. Don't get me wrong, I don't believe it is cancer that is the point, but I feel that what John Green was tryin..."

For one thing, how are they kindred spirits? The author never elaborates on the why and how of their connection and it is extremely bland and flat. The first time they see each other they only think of how pretty the other is. Also, the first time they kiss they almost immediately have sex after. Tell me how that is meaningful?

Also, what do you mean by what is their to move forward with after death? To me, if their is no life after death, if we really do not have souls, than we have no purpose. And with no purpose there is no hope. And without hope, life is not worth living and beauty means absolutely nothing. This view on life, or as you state it as so to me, seems extremely and utterly materialistic. Materialism is a horrible nothingness and it is driving our culture to ruin. Now, just tonight my siblings were watching the movie Elf and something in it caught my notice when Santa says "People don't have to see; they have to believe". Now I know it seems silly, but there's a point to it. Why must we see something to believe in it? I do not mean to offend you either, but it does seem a rather hopeless, meaningless affair... and so I pity you, even if you do not want to be pitied.


Megan YA romance isn't exactly a favourite genre of mine, so that element of the book didn't pull me in too much. But I really don't think, as some others have also stated, that their romance was the most important part.

To me the book is about surviving. Not in a literal sense, since we know Augustus dies and Hazel will follow shortly after, but surviving what life throws at you. Neither of them had any control over the hand they were dealt in life, they had limited time on earth and they could choose to crumble under the weight and unfairness of it all, or they could live what life they did have to the fullest. The book didn't focus on death or whatever happens after that, it was about life. And I think that the fact that Hazel and Gus found happiness in the midst of so much sadness is a source of hope. If you found the ending hopeless, maybe you were just focussing too much on the negatives.

To say wittiness and emotion cannot co-exist is a bit strange to me. Emotion is not always in your face and loud and dramatic. I think the relationships were woven together with subtlety. And by relationships I don't strictly mean Hazel and Gus, but also Gus and Isaac, Hazel and her parents etc. And I do feel there were very raw emotional moments in the book, for example Isaac's speech at Gus' "funeral", the scenes between Hazel and her mum surrounding the guilt Hazel feels about hearing her say she wouldn't be a mother any more after Hazel dies, and Gus' complete breakdown at the gas station.

And finally, yes they have sex soon after their first kiss. But you have to understand they're living on borrowed time. Hazel is very sick and at that point Gus knows he is dying. They didn't have sex because they were shallow and only interested in each other's bodies, and it wasn't because John Green was to lazy to write the slow, sexual tension-y build up - they simply didn't have time to wait. Again it's about getting as much out of life as they could in the time they had.


Monise Tu'a I do agree that the writing of John Green in this book held no emotion or romance, but I don't think that was the point of this novel anyway. I think it was mostly about a story of two teenagers living through cancer and how it would be. Rather than showing a lovey-dovey relationship, it showed how the two survived to make the most of their limited years and that even the ones who may seem without opportunity, will have an opportunity no matter the barriers or constraints. Also, John Green is more of a technical writer and he likes to write formally and wittily. For example his all-famous quotes.


message 9: by [deleted user] (new)

YES YES YES YES YES YES YES
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Melanie You have two abnormal teenagers. What do they know about romance? Yes, they found each other attractive, but quickly connected on a mental level with exchanging books. In a way both, but expecially Hazel wanted to avoid the emotional connection because of impedinding death.

Even teens today romance is just about sex. Hazel and Gus' first kiss was very powerful and even when they did have sex it wasn't about getting it on.

As for the lack of romance - Gus was doing everything in his power to make Hazel happy. He ended up loving her favorite book which very few people liked. He used his wish to make her real wish come true. The whole set-up when he revealed the wish...if that isn't romance please let me know what is.

I also think they are kindred spirits. If it hadn't been for cancer their worlds would never have collided. They made each other happy for that brief moment they were togehter.


Miranda Moore Melanie wrote: "You have two abnormal teenagers. What do they know about romance? Yes, they found each other attractive, but quickly connected on a mental level with exchanging books. In a way both, but expecia..."

Well put.


message 12: by hannah renee. (last edited Jan 27, 2015 09:08AM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

hannah renee. The truth is, this book was bland to me. And hopeless. I do like sad stories, or stories with sadness in them, but I do not like when a story's message is downright depressing. There is a difference between a depressing story and a sad one. Also, I don't like witty and mechanical and formal. I like something that flows and surges like a river and makes me FEEL things. This book lacked it with its formal, flat wittiness.

For me personally, I didn't feel the emotion in this book. Some like it because they can relate to it and whatnot... but for me it held nothing.

The nature of the popularity of this book is merely a fad. Just like Divergent and Twilight. There is no theme of redemption or hope. Do you not realize that the books that keep being talked about over the years have the theme of hope in common: Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter, Narnia, etc. How can I compare them? Those are fantasy novels. But they all deal with death. But the way they handle death is what makes those books timeless.


message 13: by [deleted user] (new)

Hannah wrote: "The truth is, this book was bland to me. And hopeless. I do like sad stories, or stories with sadness in them, but I do not like when a story's message is downright depressing. There is a differenc..."
Ignore the naysayers. I agree with you. Every word.


hannah renee. Brooke wrote: "Hannah wrote: "The truth is, this book was bland to me. And hopeless. I do like sad stories, or stories with sadness in them, but I do not like when a story's message is downright depressing. There..."

Haha thanks very much! :)


Jessica Don't worry you're not near the only one. I actually enjoyed John Green's prior books, and I feel The Fault in Our Stars is by far his weakest. I found it cliche and predictable, and the romance painfully bland. Thankfully the frenzy surrounding the book is steadily dying down and you're less likely to receive death threats for not liking this book.


message 16: by Miranda (last edited Feb 04, 2015 12:48PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Miranda Moore Hannah wrote: "The truth is, this book was bland to me. And hopeless. I do like sad stories, or stories with sadness in them, but I do not like when a story's message is downright depressing. There is a differenc..."

Divergent and Twilight were horribly written. I agree with you on your desire for books to make you feel strong emotions. That's the main criteria that I look for in a book, myself. However, that's where we must remember that not everyone is going to respond to the same thing.

For example, after I saw the movie Requiem for a Dream, I was curled in a ball. But my friend was unaffected. I may be affected by the Fault in Our Stars, but not everyone will be. But that's okay!



Mochaspresso Hannah wrote: "The truth is, this book was bland to me. And hopeless. I do like sad stories, or stories with sadness in them, but I do not like when a story's message is downright depressing. There is a differenc..."

Redemption and hope were not really the intended themes of The Fault in Our Stars, though. At least, not in my opinion. I felt that the major theme is life. How it isn't always fair and despite any unfairness, how you choose to live it in the time that you have. I didn't find the message depressing per se. I found it to be bittersweet. At the end, Hazel was okay with her life and didn't have any regrets.


Anastasia Caamaño I really like tfios. I am just saying my opinion, I'm not trying to be a hater, but thats how I feel. One reason I liked it is because Hazel is so relatable. I also loved the fact it was about cancer. That might sound insane, but a lot of the cancer related facts are true. For example, they talk about " cancer perks" this is VERY true. As soon as your sick that becomes you label and this book show that. Many people who didn't like it said "they didn't know the characters well enough". I feel the reason why the characters weren't well known is because they didn't know themselves who the were or wanted to be. And I feel that is whats important not entirely the romance story. Now a days, tfios is all people talk about, I personally am sick of hearing about it.It's not John Green's fault many people are talking about his book, read it through your eyes not everyone around you.


Kerri Moaning Myrtle wrote: "I really like tfios. I am just saying my opinion, I'm not trying to be a hater, but thats how I feel. One reason I liked it is because Hazel is so relatable. I also loved the fact it was about canc..."

AGREE WITH THIS SO MUCH. As a person who lives with chronic disease, I've witnessed far too many people succumb to 'becoming' their disease. Yes, cancer is a theme here, but, it also runs in the background, just becoming part of the lives of the characters--TFiOS is communicated in a very, I think, intentional way, making it not a "cancer book". [I mean, overtly boring books don't generate this kind of conversation, right?]


Sarah Hannah wrote: Also, where's the emotion???? The book was so full of witty crap that it failed to give me the emotional vibe of the book.

I completely agree with this statement, I just got lost in the dry wit of the book and felt no real emotional attachment at all to any of the characters. Except maybe Issac, I liked him.


message 21: by hannah renee. (last edited Feb 04, 2015 09:56AM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

hannah renee. Sarah wrote: "Hannah wrote: Also, where's the emotion???? The book was so full of witty crap that it failed to give me the emotional vibe of the book.

I completely agree with this statement, I just got lost in..."


Isaac was also the only character I could say I liked lol


message 22: by Sarah (last edited Feb 04, 2015 10:02AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Sarah Hannah wrote:Isaac was also the only character I could say I liked lol



Isaac was funny, and witty without just being completely dry like the other teens in the book. It was an OK quick read, but I didn't feel that it lived up to all the hype.


AidaIdani As a person who is having bad time with chronic illness, i would say this book is the kind of story that not everyone notice actually exist in our life.
Augustus died of cancer.But i don't see cancer as the theme.I see the fragility of human life and the strength to live on and let go of what we have to.The beauty of just waking up and still get to be a person (alive). To live with excruciating endless pain, which so many people thought is almost too hard to do,and yet be happy.

It is strange to say this book has no emotion.Love and life is both a very subjective matter.
This book doesn't use swords,magic,intense-actions,or even long episodes of bed scenes romance.

eye contacts maybe resembles one's attracted reaction to the other's physical .But i believe Hazel Grace Lancaster and Augustus doesn't only falls in love with each other because one is hot and muscular or the other is sophisticated and a survivor.

They fell in love because of all the right things that falls in the right place.and they tried to do their best,on surviving and loving.

When you know your life isn't going to be that easier ahead and the end is probably very near.Then, what Hazel is left with after Augustus's death is not hopelessness.It is memories, the very sweet and important ones.

however, no one reads the same books.Maybe, if you change your lens, you can see more in this book.Than just dry,emotionless or shallow things.


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