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Publishing and Promoting > Mandatory Deposits

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message 1: by Angela (new)

Angela Verdenius (angelacatlover) | 40 comments Most of you probably know this, but anyway, here goes. Apparently authors are required by law to deposit 2 print copies or the ebook copy to the Library of Congress. These are known as 'Mandatory Deposits'. Just so you know! Here is where I got some of the information from: http://www.loc.gov/search/?in=&q=...


message 2: by Christie (new)

Christie Maurer | 32 comments Angela wrote: "Most of you probably know this, but anyway, here goes. Apparently authors are required by law to deposit 2 print copies or the ebook copy to the Library of Congress. These are known as 'Mandatory..."
I question whether that still pertains according to scuttlebut from various writers' groups and conferences. Also, in the past 2 years I've visited the U.S. Copyright Office webpage twice and spoken with a staff member about my material. I think that now what you send for them to copyright is enough.


message 3: by Angela (new)

Angela Verdenius (angelacatlover) | 40 comments Oh yes, you can send the 2 copies (or ebook version if that's all you have) to register copyright, and that covers the mandatory deposits as well. From what I understand, you don't have to register copyright at all, if you don't wish, as copyright is automatic (though registering will help if a court case ensues), but if you don't register for copyright, you still need to do the 2 mandatory deposits. That's my understanding.


message 4: by Lorna (new)

Lorna Collins (lorna_collins) | 93 comments We just sent in the copyright application for one of our books. All that was required with the digital submission was the book in digital format, even though it is also in paperback. The cost is $55 for the copyright itself plus $135 for the mandatory submission. For some of our books, we were required to obtain our own copyrights even though they were published by an independent royalty-paying publisher. I'm glad we did because the publisher sold the business. If there's ever a dispute with the new publisher, we can prove we already own the copyright.


message 5: by L.G. (last edited Jan 26, 2015 12:02PM) (new)

L.G. | 13 comments Angela wrote: "Most of you probably know this, but anyway, here goes. Apparently authors are required by law to deposit 2 print copies or the ebook copy to the Library of Congress. These are known as 'Mandatory..."

I just went through this personally. There are two different kinds of deposits. Library of Congress and Copyright. One does not substitiute for the other. If you register for a LCCN (Library of Congress Control Number) for your book (a separate action from copywrite registration), you must submit a complimentary copy of the "best version" of the book to the Library of Congress. If you file for an official copyright of your book, you are required to deposit 2 copies of that book within 3 months of publication. Although you are protected by copyright without filing, you are not protected from the legal fees of defending it if you don't. Meaning, if someone infringes on your copyright and you sue them, your legal fees are recoverable from the infringing party if you filed. If not, it's on your dime. To register directly on the gov't site, it's $35 for a standard novel. Point of interest: both the Library of Congress and the Copyright Office are housed in the same building and their addresses are similar enough to cause this kind of confusion. Hope that helps you all...


message 6: by Angela (new)

Angela Verdenius (angelacatlover) | 40 comments Thanks so much for the input, ladies, its much appreciated!


message 7: by [deleted user] (new)

As a point of interest: Do these requirements only apply to US citizens or may an overseas author also apply? If so, would there be any real benefit for them in doing so?


message 8: by [deleted user] (new)

Tanya wrote: "As a point of interest: Do these requirements only apply to US citizens or may an overseas author also apply? If so, would there be any real benefit for them in doing so?"

Hi, anyone ouside the US can apply if their country has the applicable treaty with it. The website has a listing of the eligible countries. Deposit requirements differ especially if the work was first published outside the US.


message 9: by [deleted user] (new)

Olivia wrote: "Tanya wrote: "As a point of interest: Do these requirements only apply to US citizens or may an overseas author also apply? If so, would there be any real benefit for them in doing so?"

Hi, anyon..."


Thank you for the information Olivia. I will have a look.


message 10: by Lauren (new)

Lauren (laurenlibrarian) | 2 comments Angela has it right. For any copyrighted work of US origin, you are required to deposit two (it depends on type of work, but for books it's two) copies of the best edition with the US Copyright Office. If you are registering the copyright, the copies you send for registration cover the mandatory deposit requirement. If the work is foreign in origin, but is distributed in the US, the publisher/distributor/ responsible party should send one copy instead of two. Currently the best edition is considered to be the print edition.
Note--the only charges for regular (not ASAP) registration should be the registration fees. There is no charge to submit the deposit copies beyond what you pay USPS or UPS/FedEx/DHL to ship them to the CO.


message 11: by Lauren (new)

Lauren (laurenlibrarian) | 2 comments There's also this link that may be helpful: http://www.copyright.gov/mandatory/in...


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