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Saving Grace > Last Foodie Friday Giveaway

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message 1: by Matthew (new)

Matthew Perrino | 60 comments Mod
This will be our last #FoodieFriday giveaway. Answer the question below for one last opportunity to win a copy of SAVING GRACE. The winner will be randomly selected on 1/30.

Grace learned to cook from Lydia, her college roommate’s mother. Is there someone special who taught you how to cook? Anyone who passed their cherished recipes onto you?


message 2: by Ginny (new)

Ginny (gcwexler) | 5 comments My Mom and my Mother-in-law. My Mom learned to cook from her Mother-in-law, (her mother could not boil water, I kid you not), and I'm happily the keeper of all my Dad's family recipes. My beloved Mother-in-law was an amazing baker, and I have all of her family recipe. I cherish these special memories and have shared all of them with my son's, my nephews and my niece.


message 3: by Nancy (new)

Nancy (nancybook) | 11 comments My mother was a big entertainer, hosting bridge and maj jong games every week, but getting ready for them made her crazy. She wasn't really much of a family cook, but for these social events she tried to impress - little stuffed lobster shells, turkey tetrazzini, and more. She thought making a cream sauce and adding ingredients was a major cooking event! I do have her recipes and cook some of them for my family, but mostly I taught myself and signed up for cooking classes. So now I love my recipe collection!


Bonnie | 16 comments I got my love for food from my mother. She's from England; so, of course, she has had special dishes she grew up on. Many of her dishes were rustic like cassoulet which I absolutely love to eat. We've had standing rib roasts and potatoes. I remember her cooking Yorkshire pudding which is a little difficult to make. I now discover dishes from cooking shows, foodie memoirs and recipes.


message 5: by Tarri (new)

Tarri My grandmother was a wonderful cook and she lived next door. I remember making noodles and hanging them over the backs of chairs to dry.


message 6: by Pat (new)

Pat | 3 comments When I was quite young, between ages 3 and 9, my mom, dad and I lived with my grandparents. My grandmother was a wonderful cook. There was lots of delicious German food. So, from very early on, I became her helper. By forming potato dumplings and stuffing a buttery toasted crouton inside them to mastering how to crumble the sugary cinnamon topping onto her renowned crumb cake, I have l learned and subsequently tried to keep up a repertoire of her recipes as part of my family's meals and holiday traditions over the years. Pot roast, roast pork with sauerkraut, sauerbraten with those of dumplings, chicken fricasee, and her always perfect onion gravies are but some now handed to my children.


message 7: by Terri (new)

Terri (callibear) | 1 comments Throughout my childhood I watched both of my grandmothers nurture bountiful gardens and preserve their stores in large quantities for the long Maine winters. I also trekked through many a country field to harvest fresh wild berries, which became jams and jellies with a flavor no store-bought could ever match. This approach to organic, self-grown and harvested foods and crafting them into flavorful, healthy meals has inspired me to do the same in my own life. I am fortunate to have many of their time-proven recipes, written in their own hand on index cards, in my possession now. Good ol' country cooking with the best ingredients; my family and friends love it when dinner is at my house.


message 8: by Micielle (new) - added it

Micielle | 3 comments My Mom and Dad both where good cooks. So is my husband he is always showing our kids how to cook new things.


message 9: by Micielle (new) - added it

Micielle | 3 comments I love to cook when I can find the time and new recipes to try.Even if it not perfected it fun to try.


message 10: by Sally (new)

Sally | 1 comments Terri wrote: "Throughout my childhood I watched both of my grandmothers nurture bountiful gardens and preserve their stores in large quantities for the long Maine winters. I also trekked through many a country f..."

I would pay for that cookbook, Terri! You should think about publishing!


message 11: by Mary (last edited Jan 28, 2015 07:53AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Mary | 9 comments My dear mother in law Renee who passed away too soon. She raised her 2 kids in Philadelphia on a tight tight budget, so she taught me how to make simple rustic cheap delicious food. Pasta et Cici (chickpeas with ditalini), peppers and eggs, bowties with peas in olive oil and garlic, stuffed cabbage (her secret, grape jelly goes in the red sauce, which I though she was making up as a joke). The last time she visited us in Florida she wasn't well. But she sat in the kitchen with me while we drank red wine, rolled meatballs, made "gravy" and talked and laughed (and yes, got a little loaded) Everytime I make one of her simple dishes I remember that day with a smile.


message 12: by Janet (new)

Janet Senk | 3 comments My Mom and my grandmother on Dad's side. Good home cooking, comfort food and ethnic Polish/Russian recipes, and great desserts. Lived on the farm so our food was always fresh and plentiful. I have my grandmother's recipes and not sharing outside of my daughter and my own sisters/brother.


message 13: by Pat (new)

Pat | 3 comments When I was quite young, between 3 and 9, my mom, dad and I lived with my grandparents. My grandmother was a wonderful cook. Lots of German food. So, from very early on I became her helper. From forming dumplings and stuffing a butter toasted crouton inside them to learning how to make the sugary her renowned crumb cake


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