Tuesdays with Morrie Tuesdays with Morrie discussion


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Death

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message 1: by Grier (new)

Grier Adams Dear Editor,
I have recently read the book “Tuesday with Morrie” by Mitch Albom a novel about an astonishing professor. I am writing this to inform you on Death and how important it really is. The definition of Death is the end or ending of life. Death is looked upon a sad/grieving time for those who have loss someone. In the book, Morrie’s death is looked upon as a celebration of his life and work. This book is so powerful and made me look at death in a whole new perspective. Death is the world telling that your work on earth is done but it’s just begun.

Most cases, people cry or have anger because of an ending of life. About seven billion people die every day between diseases, cancers, or old age. The character Morrie looks at death as a new chapter and spirits telling him it’s his time to go. This evil “disease” ends our time with the people we love, but did you ever think that you will one day be with them again? That’s how I see death. Death should be a joyous time for us and that special someone will always be with us spiritually. Death should be thought of as a new life for ourselves.

Death is the end or ending of life. People should think of death as a joyous time but not a grieving time.

Grier A.
Ivy League School


Erika Eroy no,for me death is one thing to be sad over,why??because you lose your love..joyous is not the term for it,because your grieving and when your grieving,you must feel the same way..acceptance is the right term coz we can't find a way to give them life again...


Jessica Blair one of the reasons we are sad after a death is we are not always greiving that they have died but we are feeling the hole where that person occupied in our hearts. i remember when my grandfather died of lung cancer i did watch him die but when he did i was releived that his pain was gone and the hole in my heart was still there but i took comfort in the fact that he was no longer in pain and i cried less for that reason.


Anon_aura I'll say that death is, indeed, a sad thing. However, the people never really die, they continue to live in our hearts, impacting us unknowingly even though they're gone..


Jessica Blair Yes your absolutely right i'm a palliative care worker i learned this in school. But for some its the whole inside they feel and is not helping their grief and there is no right or wrong way and no set time one thing that drives me crazy is when people say "its been X long don't you think you should be over it by now" no it takes as long as it takes.
I still grieve for a child i lost and its been almost 10 years.


Darlene Dawn I see every ending as a new beginning, yet I'm sad because I miss my friend or loved one. It's okay to be sad. When I feel complete, then I'm grateful for the time we shared and the loving memories. And when I reach for the phone to call them with some pressing news and remember they're gone, I simply talk with them in my head like a prayer. I think they get the message and I feel connected through a love that never dies.


Jessica Blair Darlene wrote: "I see every ending as a new beginning, yet I'm sad because I miss my friend or loved one. It's okay to be sad. When I feel complete, then I'm grateful for the time we shared and the loving memories..."
When i learned of my bothers death i grieved but now we have a different relationship more spiritual but still connected and i am grateful for that.


Jessica Blair Darlene wrote: "I see every ending as a new beginning, yet I'm sad because I miss my friend or loved one. It's okay to be sad. When I feel complete, then I'm grateful for the time we shared and the loving memories..." i still speak to my brother, but yes those times can be difficult; reaching for the phone and such i used to do the same thing when my grandmother died and i still speak to my brother even after many years.


Anagha Sharma of course! death is something everyone grieves on. when you lose someone who was so dear to you, no explanation helps. since the beginning, it has been fit into our mind that death is not a very pleasant thing to happen, but we need to realize that death is inevitable. Anything that takes birth ought to perish. let us see death in a new light now, and begin to acknowledge the change! because a spiritual connection is definitely more stronger that a mere physical bond..


message 10: by Elliard (new) - added it

Elliard Shimaala I think what really hurts when someone dies is that we don't know what will happen to them next. If people could come back and tell us stories of what the other side is like, I doubt death would be as painful as it is.


Marianne Brodman No one's talked about the actual BOOK.


message 12: by C.A. (new) - rated it 5 stars

C.A. Rothermund-Franklin The meaning of the book, impending death, is what's so important in Tuesdays with Morrie. I'm drawn to this genera about those nearing death.
We're all in the same boat, if you think about it for a moment, but the only difference is that with those like Morrie, he has (or had) a better timeline of when he' was going to die. It's frightening but when someone has nothing to lose, that's when the best comes out. If we all wrote, lived and loved that way; just imagine what it would be like.


Arooba Bride I've read Tuesdays with Morrie. It's an inspiring book. But I think the main character "Morrie" wanted to have a legacy or to put a mark in the world, leave all his life lessons, he doesn't want to celebrate his death, he wanted to give it more meaning.


Arooba Bride Marianne wrote: "No one's talked about the actual BOOK."

That's funny, but the OP mostly talked about death and what should it entail.


Arooba Bride Elliard wrote: "I think what really hurts when someone dies is that we don't know what will happen to them next. If people could come back and tell us stories of what the other side is like, I doubt death would be..."
Some people believe in spirits, and that your soul can visit another soul when you're asleep. Some people claim that they watched the ones who dies in their dreams.


message 16: by C.A. (new) - rated it 5 stars

C.A. Rothermund-Franklin Arooba wrote: "I've read Tuesdays with Morrie. It's an inspiring book. But I think the main character "Morrie" wanted to have a legacy or to put a mark in the world, leave all his life lessons, he doesn't want to..."

Hi Arooba,
I agree about that. Morrie was a professor and that's something they want to do. Professors want to change the world with knowledge but what we have to work with are students.
If a professor is successful, they inspire students to go out and change the world. That's what Morrie did with Mitch. What I think made the book good was because it was just ordinary people; an ordinary professor and a student he inspired who never forgot him. It was more mundane with the pain of humanity hard-pressed into it since the plot included Morrie dying of ALS.
There's that big time gap, too. It makes us think about our actions and the effects they have on others.


Arooba Bride CA wrote: "Arooba wrote: "I've read Tuesdays with Morrie. It's an inspiring book. But I think the main character "Morrie" wanted to have a legacy or to put a mark in the world, leave all his life lessons, he ..."

I totally agree if it wasn't for teachers there would be no other working productive people in society,- and it's debated whether they should get higher salaries because of their vital role- and it is a very moving and sad story.


Marianne Brodman Arooba wrote: "CA wrote: "Arooba wrote: "I've read Tuesdays with Morrie. It's an inspiring book. But I think the main character "Morrie" wanted to have a legacy or to put a mark in the world, leave all his life l..."
Someone can be a "teacher" w/o the title, so let's relax a bit on "no other working people in society w/o them." The PARENT has always been the original teacher & it's time they took that role back. The surrender of the role is what makes everyone think they need a raise in a profession that already takes care of you for life. PS- I work in Early Childhood Education.


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