Loewenstein Spring 15 Grad. Children's Lit discussion

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Interactive Text Set Topic Ideas-Due February 6th

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message 1: by Wendy (new)

Wendy Loewenstein (wendyl612) | 32 comments Mod
After reading Fountas & Pinnell-Chapter 15, what are some possible interactive text set ideas that you have for your text set assignment that is due on February 13th? Please help one another with suggestions and ideas.


message 2: by Js26jl (new)

Js26jl | 5 comments Some text set ideas I have so far are:

Mythology - to observe and reflect on the development of a certain mythological creature (from different parts of the world) or other myths and legends.

Fairytale evolution - read the most recent incarnations of our favorite fairytale(s) and follow the trail to the most original story.

Exploring the World around us - old world explorers to the modern day explorations and what it means to still have something to wonder about and solve in our lives.

Making a difference, great or small - to show students how to gain fulfillment of giving goodness to others and not having to be the huge impact but unleashing the potential to make differences in the people's lives around you, no matter what age or occupation.


message 3: by Lisa (last edited Jan 30, 2015 09:53PM) (new)

Lisa Lathrop (lvlathrop) | 20 comments I can relate to all of your ideas as an art teacher and the connection between books and art. I especially like my students to think BIG...as in finding a purpose in everything they do, and making a difference or leaving their mark. Many artists have made an impression on society - in good ways and sometimes not so good ways. Exploring the world around us is extremely important in this day and age. My son (16) will experience the 4 different cultures this summer in a People to People Student Ambassador trip. Knowing how to relate to people of the world will be an incredibly important skills as our elementary students of today grow and become leaders of our tomorrows. Studying the history of people through books and hands-on art projects (meeting different learning styles) is a great way to understand the past and forge into the future. Great ideas! I may have to "borrow" one if you don't mind. ;)


message 4: by Wendy (new)

Wendy Loewenstein (wendyl612) | 32 comments Mod
Js26jl wrote: "Some text set ideas I have so far are:

Mythology - to observe and reflect on the development of a certain mythological creature (from different parts of the world) or other myths and legends.

Fai..."


Rick Riordan's book series have been very popular in reviving the interest in mythology. I would recommend looking in to some of those. You just have to watch the copyright date to make sure they are 2010 and newer.
I totally agree with the fairy tales becoming renewed and revived as of late. Rump is a Golden Sower Nominee for 15-16 and it is on my "to read" list. Good luck with your text set, Jennifer. I agree with Lisa in that your ideas are high interest! Either way you go, you will have fun and students will too!


message 5: by Lela (new)

Lela | 8 comments I am doing this assignment in chunks as my schedule permits, so hopefully I can add my topic ideas over time. Sorry in advanced for multiple posts. I started by using the state social study standards as a springboard for my search. I like to integrate curriculum where possible, so I will focus this "text set" idea around SS 1.4.5a; SS 1.4.5c; and SS 1.4.5d. These first grade Social Studies standards have to do with concepts of "family" in a historical and personal context. I was excited because my mind instantly jumped to the book "the Relatives Came" by Cynthia Rylant and Stephen Gammell. Hopefully there will be lots of other selections to build a literature based foundation for this theme.


message 6: by Amy (last edited Feb 01, 2015 11:42AM) (new)

Amy Jewell | 7 comments Js26jl wrote: "Some text set ideas I have so far are:

Mythology - to observe and reflect on the development of a certain mythological creature (from different parts of the world) or other myths and legends.

Fai..."


Jennifer-I like both the mythology and fairy tale ideas for text sets. I suppose that is because those are both topics that I enjoy for personal reading!


message 7: by Amy (new)

Amy Jewell | 7 comments As I am sitting here watching the snow fall and accumulate, I am thinking that I would like to do a text set on winter weather. I teach students with multiple disabilities in high school and snow and winter is a big topic of conversation each morning (the lack of snow up til this weekend!). We discuss what the weather is doing for that day and also make predictions about the weather for the following day. When we cover the weather each morning, I could easily insert some read aloud time with a text set on winter weather! In addition to books about cold and snow, I might see if I can find one about a place where winter isn't cold, to try and show my students something different from what they see all the time in Nebraska. Even though I teach high school, the students I teach are more of a K-1 level, so I would probably gear this towards 1st grade.


message 8: by Amy (new)

Amy Jewell | 7 comments Lela wrote: "I am doing this assignment in chunks as my schedule permits, so hopefully I can add my topic ideas over time. Sorry in advanced for multiple posts. I started by using the state social study standar..."

I like your idea of tying this assignment into the state social studies standards. It will be nice that you can integrate this assignment into your classroom-gives you more "bang for your buck!". It helped me come up with the text set about winter weather as that is something I think my students will truly enjoy!


message 9: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 8 comments I really liked how the Fountas and Pinnell chapter talked about the importance of reading for social values and community. This idea paired up with the influx of students in crisis that I am seeing in my classroom this year got my brain buzzing away at all of the social and emotional ammo I could give my kiddos while continuing to teach the standards (and without getting too personal).
I thought of themes like friendship, courage, loss, perspective, making choices, identity, long distance family relationships, pride, family, perseverance, kindness, safety,etc. At this point I am thinking of settling on the theme of courage with an intermediate audience.

Another Aha! moment for me was the idea of including a book of poetry. This will make for a fun challenge since, aside from Shel Silverstein, I am completely unfamiliar with children's poetry.


message 10: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Lathrop (lvlathrop) | 20 comments Thanks all for getting my wheels turning! Js26jl - discovering the world around us; Lela - social studies;


message 11: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Lathrop (lvlathrop) | 20 comments Ooopss....hit the wrong key on my iPad! Also Sarah - kindness, perseverance, family, making a difference, social and community, too. I am considering diversity. I have increasingly run into students in my classes from India. In the same class with my little guy from India are two students from Chinese descent. Art bridges the gap between cultures...and through art we learn about other cultures, their history, and learn to appreciate the uniqueness of our individuality. It would be fun to share stories of other cultures and spin art projects out of that. Although my students (small class of 6 - two Chinese, one Indian, three white Americans) get along well despite their different appearances, this seems to be a perfect opportunity to tap into the lands they are from. Choosing the correct books, I think I can get these children talking about what their families are like, their heritage, etc. And throw in some other cultural books/projects that they may not even be familiar with.


message 12: by Lela (new)

Lela | 8 comments Thanks for all the great ideas so far. Here are some more related to Social Studies standards: transportation; making choices; far and near; caring for our world; community leaders; solving problems; citizenship; holidays; money; traditions; and the dust bowl.


message 13: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 8 comments I just saw an interesting fairy tale picture book called Mirror Mirror by Josee Masse. Original fairy tales are told on one side of the page, while on the mirroring page is a the twisted tale.

Js26jl wrote: "Some text set ideas I have so far are:

Mythology - to observe and reflect on the development of a certain mythological creature (from different parts of the world) or other myths and legends.

Fai..."



message 14: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 8 comments Lisa wrote: "Ooopss....hit the wrong key on my iPad! Also Sarah - kindness, perseverance, family, making a difference, social and community, too. I am considering diversity. I have increasingly run into student..."

I saw this website about the golden rule across cultures. Some of it may cross lines with religion in public schools, but it is interesting.

http://kidworldcitizen.org/2014/05/20...


message 15: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Lathrop (lvlathrop) | 20 comments Thanks Sara...some nice links on that site. Nice ideas considering our country is more of a melting pot now than ever before. Golden Rule, random acts of kindess, making a change in our world...all great ideas.


message 16: by Tammi (new)

Tammi Peterman | 5 comments Since I am not working with students right now I am kinda all of the board with my ideas. Initially my thought was create something that is not too specific and can be adapted to different grades (something I can keep in my back pocket in case the opportunity presents itself) with this in mind I thought: Bullying (kids always need the reminder about bullying), war and conflict (the media can throw this in your face at any moment and the school must address it in an age appropriate manner), ethnic diversity & individuality, helping the earth (most districts require curriculum for Earth day this could be a great way to address it.

Because my background is history I took some time to review elementary Social Studies standards and I was drawn to standard SS 1.1.2: citizenship. I think there are a lot of books out there that will achieve better results than a textbook in addressing citizenship. I was also drawn to SS 5.3.4.c Compare and contrast historical and present day migrations to and within the United States.


message 17: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Lathrop (lvlathrop) | 20 comments Tammi wrote: "Since I am not working with students right now I am kinda all of the board with my ideas. Initially my thought was create something that is not too specific and can be adapted to different grades (..."

I think you are right about fiction/non-fiction books vs. textbooks. EVERYONE uses textbooks and I think if you are creative, you can tackle citizenship in a whole new way that will be more meaningful for students - present or future.

Bullying is a great topic as well. As parents we see it, as teachers...it might happen right in our own rooms under our noses. It would be great to react to a situation in your own classroom NOT by taking a student aside, but addressing the whole class with a story about how someone else handled the situation. Just my 2 cents ;)


message 18: by Alicia (last edited Feb 02, 2015 10:16AM) (new)

Alicia | 5 comments I had thought about doing Bullying as well! Clearly at topic that needs to be addressed no matter what the grade level is! Thinking about books on bullying led me to the idea of doing a text set exploring the reading/writing concept of "point of view." Students can gain a lot of critical thinking skills by seeing how authors create new perspectives on similar plots or events within the same story. It will help them with understanding others around them as well as creating their own writing projects with a certain perspective in mind.

To get some ideas for picture books that could support this concept, I got a lot of ideas off of Pinterest. Some teachers created a text set with tons of books that support certain reading concepts. Of course, their book sets are not necessarily within the years that we are required to look but it gave me a great idea for subject terms to put in when looking at the library.

For example, they had several fairy tale books that were told from different perspectives like "The Three Little Pigs" and "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs." That gave me the idea to look for more current remade Fairy Tales. They also had several books told from the perspective of either a toy or animal. So I looked for current books that have central characters that are toys or animals.


message 19: by Deann (new)

Deann | 9 comments Amy wrote: "As I am sitting here watching the snow fall and accumulate, I am thinking that I would like to do a text set on winter weather. I teach students with multiple disabilities in high school and snow ..."

I like your idea on doing your text set on weather. I teach first grade I will look at my books at school and see what I have in my library. I am interested in your set because I will start to teach weather in 2 weeks.


message 20: by Valerie (new)

Valerie Barnhart (vbarnhart) | 15 comments I did some thinking in regard to themes for my students at middle school. Bullying, multicultural, self-esteem, and helping others were a few that came to mind. Another one was student with disabilities or special needs, because those are students I work with a great deal. Can individual units be book sets? Holocaust, science, Civil War, Presidents of the US, and the American Revolution were a few that came to mind. Or is non-fiction not included for book sets? I have seen fiction works on these topics as well. I try to incorporate the use of a lower level reading book as a hook into a unit of study for my students. Couldn't they be included as part of the text set, regardless of reading level or class level?
I like the fairy tales and fantasy ideas as well. I am still researching for some ideas, so I may comment again in my search.


message 21: by Valerie (new)

Valerie Barnhart (vbarnhart) | 15 comments Lela wrote: "I am doing this assignment in chunks as my schedule permits, so hopefully I can add my topic ideas over time. Sorry in advanced for multiple posts. I started by using the state social study standar..."

I love the story "The Relatives Came." What a great pick!


message 22: by Lela (new)

Lela | 8 comments Ha! I forgot about the time requirements for a second there though Valerie. "The Relatives Came" is from like the '80s, so it's back to the drawing board. I'm still going with the family theme though. I have been searching on the OPL catalog. It's so helpful because the publishing dates are super visible right on the list page so I'm staying on track.


message 23: by Denice (new)

Denice Hein (deniceh) | 17 comments Lisa wrote: "Ooopss....hit the wrong key on my iPad! Also Sarah - kindness, perseverance, family, making a difference, social and community, too. I am considering diversity. I have increasingly run into student..."
What a great opportunity for a friendship circle!


message 24: by Lori (new)

Lori | 7 comments It was great reading through all your ideas on topics. Since I'm not in the classroom, it was good to know I was on the same page with ideas. My first topic to start looking through were characters in fiction/fairy tales and nursery rhymes. I am also going to explore some weather themes-maybe wind and spring as we start to look ahead to the next months and hopefully the spring temps will return soon! I also teach pre-K, K children in a church class so thought this would be a good time to look at Easter (spring) and maybe forgiveness, kindness themes.


message 25: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Lathrop (lvlathrop) | 20 comments Thanks for all the great ideas ladies. I think I'm convinced I'm going with cultural diversity. Now to find some books! :D


message 26: by Valerie (new)

Valerie Barnhart (vbarnhart) | 15 comments I am looking at text sets tonight at the library and found some ideas that didn't come to me at first. A few of the books lend to themes in Night and Day, onomatopoeia used in poetry and children's books, great selections in poetry, bullying - children's books have good resources, forgiveness, and love with Valentine's Day coming soon. Now, I need to figure out the concepts that I want to teach and what books will do that well.


message 27: by Valerie (new)

Valerie Barnhart (vbarnhart) | 15 comments Lela wrote: "Ha! I forgot about the time requirements for a second there though Valerie. "The Relatives Came" is from like the '80s, so it's back to the drawing board. I'm still going with the family theme thou..."
Yes, the dates caught me, too. There are so many great books, but I need to focus on 2010 or newer! Good point!


message 28: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Lathrop (lvlathrop) | 20 comments Just found a book that might fit into your bullying text sets: Thank You, Mr. Faulkner" Thank You, Mr. Faulkner" byPatricia Polacco. 2012!!!


message 29: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Lathrop (lvlathrop) | 20 comments Sorry...it's Mr. Falker


message 30: by Deann (new)

Deann | 9 comments I would like to do my text set to show students that different children and animals need different things to help them. I would use this set at the beginning of the year and connect it to how students need different learning tools to help them succeed. Another text set I would really like to do would be space. It is one of my favorite subjects to teach. The students love this chapter in science. Other text sets could focus on National symbols, citizenship, or friendship.


message 31: by Brianna (new)

Brianna Deines | 6 comments I have been brainstorming and trying to think outside the box with my text set. After reading several of these posts I really like the idea of Lela's theme and using social studies. Although, I am trying to think of something that could work for upper grades (4th-6th). Possibly using the text to teach predictions or drawing conclusions? What I would really like to do is some how tie this to my student's writing. Open to other ideas or suggestions :)


message 32: by Kristen (new)

Kristen | 6 comments Since I teach high school, I thinking about focusing on a strategy like inferencing or character development. Or maybe trying to find a group of books that would lend themselves to literary analysis practice before my students have to analyze theme in an entire novel. But I'm also considering centering on word choice or perhaps poetry..... So many ideas ☺️

I think I'll just see what books I can find and go from there...


message 33: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Lathrop (lvlathrop) | 20 comments I know classroom teachers are always squeezing in art so you could have students literally "draw" their conclusions and write a paragraph explaining them. That would be great tie in between social studies, visual arts and language arts.


message 34: by Angie (new)

Angie | 13 comments I, too, am currently not in the classroom, so am having a hard time narrowing down where I want to go with this assignment. I work out of the curriculum department for Lincoln Public Schools, so am very familiar with what is taught, just not sure where I want to go with it.

I have been brainstorming topics, then searching them to see what books come up. Some topics I am finding a lot of books that meet our requirements and some not so much. Here are a few of my findings:

Nebraska: I am finding there aren't many non-football related books that meet our 2010+ copyright requirement. Even one of my favorites, "C is for Cornhusker" doesn't make the cut. (K0kind of disappointing as I am always looking for new ways to teach about Nebraska.) I haven't given up on this topic yet as I think there is a lot that could be done to include writing.

Poetry/Poetic concepts: I always loved teaching poetry. I know many students don't care for it initially, so my goal was always to have my students at least have an appreciation for it by the end of our unit. SO many ways you could take this. I have some great chapter books that are written in verse. Inside Out and Back Again by Thanhh Lai is one of my new favorites and it is 2013 copyright!! It is a young girl’s story of her family fleeing Saigon during the Vietnam War and ending up in Alabama. It could also be tied into a unit on family or immigration. I’m leaning towards building my unit in a way I can use this book.

Recycling/Resources management: We only have one planet. I know this is a standard taught in third grade, but I think it could be used in other grades as well. It also would lead to some good discussions, writing prompts, service projects, etc.

Space: Another of my favorite units to teach and so many great books out there. Not only could you use books about planets, solar system, etc., but also books about space shuttles, important people in space, etc.

Fairy Tales: This has been mentioned multiple times, but there are so many different directions you could take this.

Bullying: Another one that has been mentioned a lot. Would be great if there were books to tie in cyberbullying and digital citizenship (or make that a separate topic!).

When I was teaching 7th & 8th Grade language arts, I hardly ever used the textbook. I would use whatever book(s) I could find to illustrate the literary element(s)/technique(s) we were focusing on. My students began to see it as a scavenger hunt and would often try to find examples I hadn’t mentioned or ones that appeared in whatever book they were reading for a personal read. I feel any of these topics, with the right selection of books, could be used in this manner. It takes more work than printing off a worksheet, but I felt it was more effective and fun (it was definitely more fun to teach!!). I often like to add in a book that as also been made into a movie if possible. Then, we would spend time watching certain parts of the movie and doing a compare/contrast between it and the book.


message 35: by Denice (new)

Denice Hein (deniceh) | 17 comments Angie wrote: "I, too, am currently not in the classroom, so am having a hard time narrowing down where I want to go with this assignment. I work out of the curriculum department for Lincoln Public Schools, so am..."

I love your variety of your list. It is helpful to see others' path on their journeys.


message 36: by Denice (new)

Denice Hein (deniceh) | 17 comments For my reflection of the chapter and the text set, I am struggling with my inner middle schooler. I have been a middle school teacher for 19 years. I know the parameters of children’s literature reaches to the intermediate grades, but I have to keep in mind the lower grades as I look at the young adult literature in my school’s library. So in targeting the children’s lit focus, I find my heart focusing on my daughter. A vivacious almost 6 year old with wide interests and needs.

First, Kara is adopted. So exploring books on adoption to show her and other students that it is a healthy family option. Within our personal library we have Tell Me Again About the Night I was Born by Jamie Lee Curtis that is told by an excited little girl and her birth story. It also has a supporting character of a dog that is equally excited about his adoption story. But sadly it is out of our copyright date, way out 1996. Adoption as a topic can grow into Families and Acceptance.

Second my daughter is biracial. Her birth father that is not part of her life, gives her the lovely bronze of her skin color. I am always looking for books that show her herself within the pages. One of our favorite gifts from her birth is Shades of Black: A Celebration of our Children by Sandra L. Pinkney. Copyright of 2000 (Dangit!) The book has real photographs of real children that are all shades of black. It has helped her feel comfortable in her own skin. Related themes could be Diversity, Unity, Studies of Different Cultures.

Recently at her kindergarten Parent Teacher Conferences, I was presented with her writing. The teacher reported how they are working on a story with a beginning, middle and end. (same in 7th grade!!) So stories that had great beginnings, that could be used as teasers and let the students do the middle and end. Or choosing books with fabulous art showing the students the endings to have them start the stories would be fun, really stretching the writing skills of students and welcoming all the ideas that came forward.

I also love poetry and think the colorful images would help students develop language of their own.

Lastly I thought about things I wanted my daughter to grow up knowing. I want her to know strong women, strong African Americans and strong family values. If that can start in stories, I’m all for it. Some topics I thought of is Strong Female lead characters that triumph and of course co-ed public education would have to be followed by Strong Male characters. February brings about Black History Month, so that’s an easy connection. Family values that we are struggling with currently are Honesty, What a friend really is and Stranger Danger.

Now on to the search….


message 37: by Valerie (new)

Valerie Barnhart (vbarnhart) | 15 comments Kristen wrote: "Since I teach high school, I thinking about focusing on a strategy like inferencing or character development. Or maybe trying to find a group of books that would lend themselves to literary analysi..."

I was looking at application in high school as well. One idea is to look at character and motivation. In reading RUMP, even the fairy tales have a motivation for their actions. The concept that it doesn't necessarily match what we pair that character with adds to the originality of the story. Theme is another great idea.


message 38: by Amanda (last edited Feb 04, 2015 08:37PM) (new)

Amanda Nye | 14 comments Immediately after we were given this assignment, I began thinking about my own classroom and how I could use this assignment to benefit my students! Since I teach Kindergarten, we explore variety of topics about self-development and social interactions. I pondered bullying, health and wellness, etc, then it hit me! (I almost want to smack my forehead and say "DUH!") I am ALWAYS looking for books on FRIENDSHIP for my classroom. I feel that those always make the greatest impact on my kiddos! So I am perfectly confident with my decision the focus on Friendship!
Any suggestions on an intermediate book???


message 39: by Amanda (last edited Feb 04, 2015 08:19PM) (new)

Amanda Nye | 14 comments Brianna wrote: "I have been brainstorming and trying to think outside the box with my text set. After reading several of these posts I really like the idea of Lela's theme and using social studies. Although, I am..."

I really like your idea of focusing on predictions. That can be used in any subject; social studies, science, writing, math, etc. You could select books that allow students to make predictions throughout or at the ending of the book. The book "What Do You Do With a Tail Like This?" by Steve Jenkins & Robin Page is perfect for prediction with the youngsters! I use this in my Kindergarten classroom to teach predictions. They see a preview of a tail and they must predict what animal it belongs to. Hope this helps! Happy book hunting!


message 40: by Amanda (new)

Amanda Nye | 14 comments Denice wrote: "For my reflection of the chapter and the text set, I am struggling with my inner middle schooler. I have been a middle school teacher for 19 years. I know the parameters of children’s literature re..."

For Black History month, I read a great book about Rosa Parks to my kindergartners! It is illustrated by Faith Ringgold, so it has BEAUTIFUL pictures! The book is called, "If A Bus Could Talk, The Story of Rosa Parks" by Faith Ringgold. Rosa Parks is definitely a strong African American woman you can focus on! :) Hope this helps! Happy book hunting!


message 41: by Amanda (new)

Amanda Nye | 14 comments Deann wrote: "I would like to do my text set to show students that different children and animals need different things to help them. I would use this set at the beginning of the year and connect it to how stud..."

For my student's book shelf, I found a GREAT book about Space if you are planning to head in that direction (which I love!). The book is called "SPACE" by Sarah Powell. It has great pictures and really good information! Hope this helps! Happy book hunting!


message 42: by Amanda (last edited Feb 04, 2015 08:33PM) (new)

Amanda Nye | 14 comments Lisa wrote: "Thanks for all the great ideas ladies. I think I'm convinced I'm going with cultural diversity. Now to find some books! :D"

I have the PERFECT book for you to do cultural diversity!!!!!!!! I use this each year in my Kindergarten classroom to talk about our differences and similarities. After we read this book, each child decorates a crayon and we create a box of crayons to show our diversity. Here is an overview that I copy and pasted...

"Yellow hates Red, so does Green, and no one likes Orange! Can these crayons quit arguing and learn to cooperate? Shane DeRolf's deceptively simple poem celebrates the creation of harmony through diversity. In combination with Michael Letzig's vibrant illustrations, young readers will understand that when we all work together, the results are much more colorful and interesting.
Although they are many different colors, the crayons in a box discover that when they get together they can appreciate each other and make a complete picture."

Perfect, right???? PLUS this is great for your ART CLASS! :)


I absolutely LOVE this book and I know you will too. I have a copy if you need to borrow! It is called "The Crayon Box that Talked" by Shane Derolf.

Look into it! Great primary book! :)


message 43: by Michelle (new)

Michelle | 12 comments I have been thinking of some possible topics, too. I'm having a little bit of a hard time with narrowing it down. I'm not in a classroom currently and I think that I have too many options in my head!

Some of the possible topics that I'm looking into are:

Sharing/friendship: I can think of many great books to fit this topic. I love the Mo Willems books about Pigeon and Piggie & Gerald. It would be fun to do something with those.

I am also thinking of something with women's history or civil rights. I'm not sure which direction to take these for grade level.

I'm going to check out some books and hopefully that will help me narrow it down.


message 44: by Lori (last edited Feb 05, 2015 07:13AM) (new)

Lori | 7 comments Thanks again to all of you for sharing all these great topic ideas. I am finding that I am having to stick with the topics that are pretty broad so I make sure I am able to locate current books and books that are available in my library (learned that lesson from the book bundle assignment.) Based on that criteria I am finding it much easier to narrow things down. So far I am the most pleased with the fairy tales/nursery rhymes books I have looked at.
I have to eliminate Courage, Kindness and Forgiveness, Spring,Wind, and Self-Acceptance.
I would still like to explore some other topics before I make my final decision: First Day of School, School/Teachers, Careers, Insects (this one looks promising!), and Friendship.


message 45: by Chris (new)

Chris | 10 comments I have been reading all of your posts and researching myself all week. Thank you for all your insights! With being "snowed in" I have had some time to do some extra research and it has been such a pleasure. I have been able to browse many sites: Scholastic, Amazon, Goodreads, Biblionasium, etc. I even signed my son, Charlie, up for a Biblionasium account. I have research mocked Caldecott and Newberry. Also, found storysnoop.com that gave me a list of awards each book has won. In doing all this looking, I found a book called Inside Out and Back Again by Thanhha Lai that caught my eye. It's a historical fiction intermediate book written in verse. Once I came across it, I thought that I would go with a text set of historical fiction. After reviewing the book, I found it also touches on the themes of immigration, Vietnam War, tolerance/acceptance, and family life. So now, I am trying to decide with which theme I go. Perhaps I can stick with historical fiction and then tie in the theme of war or immigrants/refugees. I will get back to exploring and write again later today.


message 46: by Cathy (new)

Cathy Field | 6 comments I've come up with quite a few text set ideas and tried to base the theme on sets of science or social studies objectives with the intention of using books that lend themselves well to various reading and writing objectives.

My first choice is to do habitats, so students can determine what characteristics need to be investigated to determine what type of habitat a place has. Secondarily, so students can identify and compare/contrast the specific characteristics of habitats.

My second choice is to do a text set about migration and to include human migrations, such as westward expansion, into the text set. This will help students determine why species migrate and the trials they face when they move from place to place.

Other ideas I have; holidays from various cultures, memoirs, pop-up books (they have so many for upper grade levels now), biographies, and state/local artists (writers, painters, singers, etc.), handicaps/special needs and survival stories.

I'm having a hard time deciding which one to do and find that my number one and two choices keep changing! I'm focusing my text set on 4th/5th grade and plan to integrate some of the following reading and writing skills: compare/contrast, point of view, inference, format, text characteristics, illustration strategies, timeline of story, genre, prose, authors use of story telling strategies and integrating technology support.


message 47: by Sara (new)

Sara (sebuelt) | 8 comments Wow! Turns out I'm late to the party and getting to discuss text sets. It's been a crazy week, but I have been thinking about text set topics a lot. The next unit my 7th Reading students will be starting includes two non-fiction books about African-American history. One deals specifically with civil rights in America, while the other starts with the history of African children in ancient Africa, all the way up to modern-day America. Students really get into the books, but often haven't yet received enough historical background to understand them as deeply as they could. I've used a variety of stories and outside sources to get them interested in the past, however, much of them have focused on Civil Rights.

I hope to develop a text set that covers a larger scope of African/African-American history, as opposed to just Civil Rights. I do want to have at least one Civil Rights related book, but hope that it comes from a story that's not as widely known. I also hope to share fiction stories that will help the non-fiction information they read feel more relatable. I'd love to hear any ideas anyone has! :)


message 48: by Valerie (new)

Valerie Barnhart (vbarnhart) | 15 comments I have searched and searched on Mackin, Follett, Biblionasium, Amazon, and the local library for books. At this time, I am planning on going safe with the fairy tales group or bullying books that I have read and located. I plan to look at story plot and theme. Set up the novel with the outline of events and look at elements of the fiction story. The grade level is very adaptable to whatever grade is desired. Setting, characters, exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution, and theme are main areas to cover. What is the conflict? What is the problem? What is the climax? How is the problem resolved?

I use this with my middle school students in English classes to review the process several times in the year. In the beginning, we use children's books to illustrate the basic story outline, and by the end of the year, the students are explaining the steps to me from the larger books we are reading. I would also use this to demonstrate smaller mini-lessons during the year such as irony, satire, point of view, onomatopoeia, similes, metaphors, inferences, foreshadowing, alliteration, personification, rhyme, rhythm, repetition, and different genres. I am finding that many of the books I use for different things do not meet the required publishing date. So that has been difficult. In acquiring the books through the local library, I am not always able to access the books that are really current. I love the themes that are available. I had started with the idea of doing a text set on disabilities. One with cultural diversity would also be great. I am looking forward to seeing what other students in the class found on topics. Happy reading to all!


message 49: by Sara (new)

Sara (sebuelt) | 8 comments Cathy wrote: "I've come up with quite a few text set ideas and tried to base the theme on sets of science or social studies objectives with the intention of using books that lend themselves well to various readi..."

My 7th graders have had a great time learning about the Donner party and their westward migration. I know there are a variety of texts out there that talk about the Donners. One intermediate title my students have enjoyed this year is Nathan Hale's Hazardous Tales - Donner Dinner Party. While it's recommended for grades 3-7, I do think they'd need some guidance. Sometimes it can be difficult for students to sift through the jokes, puns, etc. that are included.


message 50: by Sara (new)

Sara (sebuelt) | 8 comments Angie wrote: "I, too, am currently not in the classroom, so am having a hard time narrowing down where I want to go with this assignment. I work out of the curriculum department for Lincoln Public Schools, so am..."

For my last assignment I used the book Journey by Aaron Becker. While there are no words in Journey, it lends itself well to the idea of fairytales. It might be cool to do some interactive read alouds with different fairy tale stories, then let the kids create their own using images from the book Journey.


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