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Multicultural Lit Groups: Prompt 2

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message 1: by Heather (new)

Heather (heatheramana) | 9 comments Mod
Choose a passage that you find particularly beautiful or powerful. What devices (imagery,figurative language, etc.) did the author use to make an impact on the reader? How does this relate to the overall theme, conflict or characterization of your novel thus far?


message 2: by Rania (new)

Rania Belamesh | 5 comments A passage that I found to be beautiful is when Laura calls her bestfriend,Soli,if she coukd live with her," I sip my soda as he gives Chispita water in a bowl. Then I call Soli and tell her I need a place to crash. Soli dosent wait for me to finish my explanation. "Stay put!I'll be there in three seconds!" That's one thing about Soli:shes's never let me down." I found this beautiful beacause it shows Soli's true love towards Laura and her situation. Even though Soli knows shes a lesbian, she treats her just like everyone else. This passage is a similie becasue as represents what the man is doing for Chispita (the dog).This impacted my thoughts on how Laura was being treated by strangers not knowing about her sexuality, thinking that they would hurt her but instead help her. This relates to the overall theme of the book because it shows how throughout the rest of the novel, Laura has someone who truly cares about her during her hard time with her mother.Many acts of conflicts arise but Soli never leaves her.


message 3: by 03isabellag (new)

03isabellag | 14 comments A passage that I found powerful in The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Doaz is, "It truly was a Golden Age for Oscar, one that reached its apotheosis in the fall of his seventh year, when he had two little girlfriends at the same time, his first and only ménage à trois. With Maritza Chacón and Olga Polanco" (Diaz). I find this a powerful quote because Oscar's life growing up was awesome. As a kid, all the girl's had crushes on him, and he always seemed to have a way with the ladies. As he grew up this began to change. Although at one point in his life Oscar could have whatever girl he wanted, and he even had two girlfriends at once, this didn't last long. He became overweight and not girls would look at him, not even ugly ones. Oscar knew he was a good guy, and he didn't understand why people couldn't look past ones physicals appearance. All through high school, his previous girlfriends wouldn't even give him the time of day, but he didn't feel the need to change his appearance or who he was as a person to please someone else. I found this quote powerful because it shows how quickly things can change. One day you could be extremely popular and the talk of the town, but the next day you could be gone and forgotten just like everyone else. Oscar doesn't seem to let this transformation affect his outlook, but he does seem to wish people could see beyond his physical appearance.


message 4: by Ariana (new)

Ariana | 25 comments Ariana Ashufta
1/24/15
Period 3
Amanatullah E2 Honors
In the novel I am reading, The namesake I found the passage of the main characters father telling his son the significance of his “Good name” to be very powerful. The author uses great imagery to put you In Gogol’s position in which he is sitting with his father hearing of how his name came to be. Gogol sits with his father as, “for an instant his father is a stranger, a man who has kept a secret, has survived a tragedy a man whose past he does not fully know. A man who is vulnerable, who has suffered in an inconceivable way….. Again instinct he tries to imagine life without his father, a world in which his father does not exist” ( Lahiri 123). The author made this passage in a way to see what it would be like to be in Gogol’s shoes in feeling the guilt he is feeling for changing his Bengali name to something he wouldn’t be ashamed of. His father Ashoke, was naming his first child after something that was of great significance to his life in which he had almost died and Gogul had been unaware of this all along. The book that his father had almost died with saved him and the author’s name is Gogul, thus what he named his son to give him a reminder of, “everything that has followed” (124).Gogol in a way is shocked his father kept such a big secret and wishes that his father would have told him this before. This is applies greatly to the major theme of the story in wanting to belong and feel like everyone else, just as Gogol wants to feel like he belongs in such an American place being a Bengali. Gogol starts to forget where he has come from and does everything the American way and starts to neglect his culture and where he came from. The author is trying to send the greater message of never forgetting where you culture comes from and how your family will always be there for you no matter what. This has a great impact on the reader in realizing everyone is different and no one should have to change anything about themselves to feel like they belong. This relates to the conflict of Gogol wanting to be more American vs. his parents wanting him to stick to his Bengali background.


message 5: by 03shelbyt (new)

03shelbyt | 12 comments Shelby Thompson
Amanatullah
English 2H P.3
25 January 2015

Throughout the novel The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, the author Junot Diaz mentions Oscar's mom Belicia having a scar multiple times. The first time you read about it is when her daughter Lola discovers her mom as breast cancer. She describes "the scar on her back as vast and inconsolable as a sea"(51). The second reoccurrence is when La Inca is telling Lola of Beli's past and struggles. She gets into trouble and her scar is exposed, it's again described as "vast"..."like nothing anybody had ever seen before"(100).
I found these two passages important and powerful because they serve as an explanation to the readers why Beli is the way she is. Oscar and Lola were always "more scared of [their] mother than [they] were of the dark of el cuco"(54). Beli is a very hot headed mother who wasn't afraid to give her children discipline when she needed to. In La Inca's story of Beli as a child this part of her personality becomes more understandable. As a child she was treated poorly, and before La Inca started raising her she was adopted by two other people. When Beli told them she wanted to focus on an education instead of working, they were furious. Her father responded by splashing hot oil onto her back and it burned her skin terribly. This traumatic even left not only a scar she would have for the rest of her life but it also created a very vulnerable side to her that later turned into harsh parenting ways as well.
These quotes help characterize Beli and show the reader how she became the person she is when she has Oscar and Lola. Diaz uses imagery to help us imagine how Beli must have felt throughout her youth. This is related to the overall conflict of the novel because as many people say "Like [parent] like [child]". Beli's parenting is similar to what she group up with and it takes a toll on her children, especially Oscar. He tries to seek positivity in his life, but between school and home there seems to be no hope. His family members and friends never give him compliments or encouragement. This adds to Oscars depressed state of life.


message 6: by 03shelbyt (new)

03shelbyt | 12 comments Shelby Thompson
Amanatullah
English 2H P.3
25 January 2015

Throughout the novel The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, the author Junot Diaz mentions Oscar's mom Belicia having a scar multiple times. The first time you read about it is when her daughter Lola discovers her mom as breast cancer. She describes "the scar on her back as vast and inconsolable as a sea"(51). The second reoccurrence is when La Inca is telling Lola of Beli's past and struggles. She gets into trouble and her scar is exposed, it's again described as "vast"..."like nothing anybody had ever seen before"(100).
I found these two passages important and powerful because they serve as an explanation to the readers why Beli is the way she is. Oscar and Lola were always "more scared of [their] mother than [they] were of the dark of el cuco"(54). Beli is a very hot headed mother who wasn't afraid to give her children discipline when she needed to. In La Inca's story of Beli as a child this part of her personality becomes more understandable. As a child she was treated poorly, and before La Inca started raising her she was adopted by two other people. When Beli told them she wanted to focus on an education instead of working, they were furious. Her father responded by splashing hot oil onto her back and it burned her skin terribly. This traumatic even left not only a scar she would have for the rest of her life but it also created a very vulnerable side to her that later turned into harsh parenting ways as well.
These quotes help characterize Beli and show the reader how she became the person she is when she has Oscar and Lola. Diaz uses imagery to help us imagine how Beli must have felt throughout her youth. This is related to the overall conflict of the novel because as many people say "Like [parent] like [child]". Beli's parenting is similar to what she group up with and it takes a toll on her children, especially Oscar. He tries to seek positivity in his life, but between school and home there seems to be no hope. His family members and friends never give him compliments or encouragement. This adds to Oscars depressed state of life.


message 7: by Tasos (new)

Tasos | 22 comments Tasos Tentoglou
Amanatullah
Eng 2H
1/25/15
A passage that I found powerful in Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is, “Dear Non-American Black, when you make the choice to come to America, you become black. Stop arguing. Stop saying I'm Jamaican or I'm Ghanaian. America doesn't care. So what if you weren't “black” in your country?”(Adichie 273). This passage was taken from Ifemelu’s article called “To My Fellow Non-American Blacks: In America, You Are Black, Baby.” I find this passage powerful because Ifemelu is being completely honest. She describes the modern lives of African Americans in the US. Ifemelu observes the actions they take in certain areas; for instance,” You must nod back when a black person nods at you in a heavily white area”(Adichie 274). Another important quote is,” always use the word STRONG”(Adichie 274). This is a very powerful line because it describes how black women have to act in America; Ifemelu states that black women are supposed to be scary in America.


message 8: by Matt (new)

Matt Fernandez | 12 comments So far in the novel, "The Brief Wonderous Life of Oscar Wao," there have been many powerful and beautiful passages. One that stood out the most to me so far is, "At first all you feel is the heat of her and the density of the tissue, like a bread that never stops rising. She kneads your fingers into her. You're as close as you've ever been and your breathing is what you hear, (Díaz 53). This passage is


message 9: by Matt (new)

Matt Fernandez | 12 comments (Continuing on from my first one) powerful to me because it's mentioning how close you are with your loved ones (in this case Lola's mom). Your mom is everything that you can have... Your best friend, someone you can rely on, everything. It's upsetting that Lola wasn't close with her and how she left her mom and her family and moved away. Also at the meeting with her brother at the coffee shop was supposed to be planned between them but Oscar told his mom to be there too. Lola's mom was knocked over by Lola and she cries to Lola and asks for her to come back. That to me is very powerful because if I were in Lola's feet if be speechless and break down. Having your mom cry to you to come back home is powerful without a doubt. I couldn't imagine having to go through that process. That passage really got me more into the book and the decision that Lola made to go live with her grandmother instead really defines her character and what her family thinks of her now.


message 10: by 03SheilyM (new)

03SheilyM | 20 comments There were various powerful passages in The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz, but the one that stuck out to me most was , “ The world outside so beautiful, but inside the car . . . They’d been punching her and her right eye had puffed into a malignant slit, her right breast so preposterously swollen that it looked like it would burst, her lip was split and something was wrong with her jar, she couldn’t swallow without causing herself excruciating shocks of pain. She cried out each time they struck her but she didn’t cry, entiendes? Her fierceness astounds me. She would not give them the pleasure ” ( Diaz ). This quote is showing that even though Beli was being beaten very harshly while pregnant she didn’t want to show the men beating her that she was hurting and weak because then they’d be happy and so would Dionisio’s wife. Diaz uses imagery which makes the quote more powerful and makes the reader picture whats happening. This relates to the overall characterization of the novel so far because how Oscar’s mom was treated growing up probably effects why he doesn’t feel good about himself because she doesn’t know how to show care and love because she didn’t get it growing up.


message 11: by 03jasonw (new)

03jasonw | 16 comments Jason Whitney
Amanatullah
Eng 2H
1/25/15

A passage I found to be rather powerful in, "Dracula," comes from a doomed sea-captain's log:

"4 August.—Still fog, which the sunrise cannot pierce. I know there is sunrise because I am a sailor, why else I know not. I dared not go below, I dared not leave the helm; so here all night I stayed, and in the dimness of the night I saw It—Him! God forgive me, but the mate was right to jump overboard. It was better to die like a man; to die like a sailor in blue water no man can object. But I am captain, and I must not leave my ship. But I shall baffle this fiend or monster, for I shall tie my hands to the wheel when my strength begins to fail, and along with them I shall tie that which He—It!—dare not touch; and then, come good wind or foul, I shall save my soul, and my honour as a captain. I am growing weaker, and the night is coming on. If He can look me in the face again, I may not have time to act.... If we are wrecked, mayhap this bottle may be found, and those who find it may understand; if not, ... well, then all men shall know that I have been true to my trust. God and the Blessed Virgin and the saints help a poor ignorant soul trying to do his duty" (84)...

[The ship was found washed up on a beach, with the deceased captain's hands tied to the wheel with rosary beads. The log was in his pocket, kept within a bottle. The only thing alive on the boat was a dog, which ran off immediately.]

This quote shows the strength and terror our antagonizing Count holds. The prior entries in the logbook talk about how a boat full of men was shrinking in number day by day, finally leading up to this passage. The captain knew he was already a dead man, yet he did his duty of completing the ship's course, rather than take the easy way out by jumping ship. It also establishes a pity/respect for the unfortunate sailor, and that's quite a lot for less than five pages of character development.


message 12: by Ariana (new)

Ariana | 25 comments 03SheilyM wrote: "There were various powerful passages in The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz, but the one that stuck out to me most was , “ The world outside so beautiful, but inside the car . . . Th..."

In response to Sheily, our novels have quite different conflicts, but both authors seem to use powerful imagery. Both authors seem to be creating a clear picture for the reader to fully understand what's happening.


message 13: by Ariana (new)

Ariana | 25 comments 03jasonw wrote: "Jason Whitney
Amanatullah
Eng 2H
1/25/15

A passage I found to be rather powerful in, "Dracula," comes from a doomed sea-captain's log:

"4 August.—Still fog, which the sunrise cannot pierce. I kno..."


In response to Jason, our novels are quite different, but both main characters seem to have pity as well as repsect for other major characters. In my novel I am reading, The Namesake, the main character has great pity for his father. The main character as well has great respect for his father who has been through a lot to get to where he is today.


message 14: by Caroline (new)

Caroline Grandia | 15 comments Tasos wrote: "Tasos Tentoglou
Amanatullah
Eng 2H
1/25/15
A passage that I found powerful in Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is, “Dear Non-American Black, when you make the choice to come to America, you b..."


In response to comrade Tasos, I agree that Ngozi's honesty is powerful and how her words are powerful to fellow immigrants in America, as well as potentially ignorant Americans.


message 15: by 03jessical (new)

03jessical | 22 comments In the book, "Down to the Bone," the passage that I find particularly powerful is
"He was born in the wrong body. Joaquin should have been a girl. 'One night Joy went back home dressed as a boy, as Joaquin. He asked my father to forgive him. He said if he'd take him back, he'd never dress as a girl again. My dad belted him till he bled. He told him he didn't love him and he never wanted to see him again. My brother committed suicide that night'"(Dole 67).

This passage stood out to me because it comes to show that there are people in this world who aren't very accepting of others. It surprises me how although it's clear that you can't control who you are or who you like; you are still constantly judged and bullied for that. It is out of your capability to chose weather your a boy or a girl, so it is outrageous to me that parents would disown and not love their child for who they are. I think this passage symbolizes the need of more acceptance and appreciation for what you are given. Also the realization that we are all human and shouldn't be treated differently. This ties to the conflict of this book because the main character Laura is in a similar situation were her mother says that she's a disgrace to their family name and isn't allowed back into the house until she stops her sinful ways. It just goes to show that acceptance is a hard concept and once people learn to accept, we will be living in a kinder world.


message 16: by 03jessical (new)

03jessical | 22 comments Rania wrote: "A passage that I found to be beautiful is when Laura calls her bestfriend,Soli,if she coukd live with her," I sip my soda as he gives Chispita water in a bowl. Then I call Soli and tell her I need ..."

In response to Rania, the quote you chose was my initial choice. I totally agree that it was beautiful how Soli would stop everything and be at Laura's side when she needed her most. This kind of friendship is so important especially all that Laura has been through. This comes to show that some people are very accepting and don't care that ur different because your still human.


message 17: by Caroline (new)

Caroline Grandia | 15 comments One passage I found particularly powerful in Americanah was,“The only reason you say that race was not an issue is because you wish it was not. We all wish it was not. But it’s a lie. I came from a country where race was not an issue; I did not think of myself as black and I only became black when I came to America. When you are black in America and you fall in love with a white person, race doesn’t matter when you’re alone together because it’s just you and your love. But the minute you step outside, race matters. But we don’t talk about it. We don’t even tell our white partners the small things that piss us off and the things we wish they understood better, because we’re worried they will say we’re overreacting, or we’re being too sensitive. And we don’t want them to say, Look how far we’ve come, just forty years ago it would have been illegal for us to even be a couple blah blah blah, because you know what we’re thinking when they say that? We’re thinking why the f*** should it ever have been illegal anyway? But we don’t say any of this stuff. We let it pile up inside our heads and when we come to nice liberal dinners like this, we say that race doesn’t matter because that’s what we’re supposed to say, to keep our nice liberal friends comfortable. It’s true. I speak from experience” (Ifemelu 360).

This passage is incredibly powerful because it shows that even though we have come very far, we still have a long way to go. It reminds us that racism is ignored by people who don’t experience it; by not experiencing it, they forget it exists and how it is present for people of color in everyday life. Ifemelu is constantly told that “race doesn’t matter” or “we’re all the human race” by people who believe that forgetting about past struggles will atone for them or make them irrelevant. Meanwhile, unknown to white people, black people experience discrimination on a daily basis but end up being told that to consider everyone equal, they must not see, think about, or discuss race. Additionally, it shows how it is also equally as dangerous to try to erase the past because “things are better now” when they never should have been that way, especially considering that the only people who say that will never experience racism, their ancestors never experienced racism, and they will never see their children experience racism.

This passage has an immense impact on the reader because the reader will receive the quote differently depending on who they are. A white American may be taken aback by the reality they were unaware of because they never realized how damaging it is to ignore or trivialize racial issues and how doing that actually contributes to the problem. People who have had similar experiences as Ifemelu might connect to this passage because she is giving her honest account of what is like to live in America as a black woman.


message 18: by Tasos (new)

Tasos | 22 comments In response to Caroline,
I like your view on how the reader will interpret the quote differently than others.


message 19: by Sarah (new)

Sarah (03SarahS) | 17 comments A passage from "Americanah" by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie that had an impact on me came from one of Ifemelu's blogposts about racism. She wrote, "In America, racism exists but racists are all gone. Racists belong to the past. Racists are the thin-lipped mean white people in the movies about the civil rights era. Here’s the thing: the manifestation of racism has changed but the language has not. So if you haven’t lynched somebody then you can’t be called a racist. If you’re not a bloodsucking monster, then you can’t be called a racist. Somebody has to be able to say that racists are not monsters” (Adichie 390). This is a very powerful passage because it is incredibly honest and bold. Ifemelu does not attempt to be tactful when calling Americans out, which is why she's such a great character. Here, she explains how racism is still ever-present in America, yet many Americans view racism as a past mistake that has since been fixed. Nowadays, racism is often internalized, and can be perpetuated through every-day speech and "well-meaning" generalizations. For example, Ifemelu met many Americans who said things like "It must be so hard to be living on the dollar in Africa" upon finding out were she was from. However, many white folks believe that racism can only be manifested through blatant hatred, like racial slurs. This is incredibly problematic, because as long as we don't recognize the underlying racism in white American attitudes, we can never address and overcome it.


message 20: by Sarah (new)

Sarah (03SarahS) | 17 comments Caroline wrote: "“The only reason you say that race was not an issue is because you wish it was not. We all wish it was not. But it’s a lie. I came from a country where race was not an issue; I did not think of mys..."

Very well-thought out and thorough response, my dear. I agree completely that ignoring racism only perpuates it more. As uncomfortable as it may be to acknowledge the continued existence of racism in America, putting that discomfort above the pain of people who are actually effected by racism makes you part of the problem.


message 21: by ctrenchard (new)

ctrenchard | 20 comments Cadence Trenchard
Amanatullah
English 2H
Period 3
1/25/15

One powerful passage that I found in The Namesake", by Jhumpa Lahiri, describes an interesting similarity between being a foreigner and being pregnant:

"Though no longer pregnant, [Ashima] continues, at times, to mix Rice Krispies and peanuts and onions in a bowl. For being a foreigner, Ashima is beginning to realize, is a sort of lifelong pregnancy--a perpetual wait, a constant burden, a continuous feeling out of sorts. It is an ongoing responsibility, a parenthesis in what had once been an ordinary life, only to discover that the previous life has vanished, replaced by something more complicated and demanding. Like pregnancy, being a foreigner, Ashima believes, is something that elicits the same curiosity from strangers, the same combination of pity and respect" (Lahiri 49).

This shows that Ashima still struggles with adjusting to America, and feels as if her "previous life" is gone for good. This passage helped me feel her pain and understand how she felt about being a foreigner in America. This relates to the theme of feeling out of place, something that both Ashima and Gogol (Nikhil) had trouble with, although Gogol had always felt like an outsider in India, unlike his parents. When Gogol becomes Nikhil, I'd imagine that he could've felt similarly, like his previous life (of being Gogol) had just disappeared, although that thought would've given him comfort. He was glad to start fresh and forget that he had ever been Gogol Ganguli.


message 22: by Zoh (new)

Zoh | 8 comments There is a passage in the book A Study In Scarlet that I find very beautiful/caring is when you are just reading Dr. Watsons thoughts alone, you see how he yearns for a companion. How Sherlock Holmes fits that position well, he brings mystery, excitement, always keeping Watson on edge. Having Holmes is giving him something to live for through all his troubles in Afghanistan and becoming a doctor. There are many parts in the book where he is very opinionated about how Holmes lives his life as well as how he lacks important knowledge he has this one part just being happy with this craziness in his life. They are more than partners or room mates their best friends. Your eyes are more opened to the strong bond they have with one another which helps them solve mysteries together. They both have their on opinions but they share the same knowledge each of them have to offer.


message 23: by ctrenchard (new)

ctrenchard | 20 comments Ariana wrote: "Ariana Ashufta
1/24/15
Period 3
Amanatullah E2 Honors
In the novel I am reading, The namesake I found the passage of the main characters father telling his son the significance of his “Good n..."


Ariana, I liked the quote that you chose for this prompt and I totally agreed with what you said about how "no one should have to change anything about themselves to feel like they belong". I can see how the conflict--of Gogol wanting to adopt American ways while his parents wanted him to embrace his culture--appears throughout The Namesake but I'm not sure how that ties in with this exact passage?


message 24: by 03sammyn (new)

03sammyn | 17 comments In The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, Junot Diaz fills the pages with many examples of beautiful and deep writing. On the plane to New York, Oscar and Lola’s mother, Hypatía Belicia Cabral, is described with very powerful writing. Diaz describes Beli as follows: “She [Beli] is sixteen and her skin is the darkness before the black, the plumb of the day’s light, her breasts like sunsets trapped beneath her skin, but for all her youth and beauty she has a sour disturbing expression that only dissolves under the weight of immense pleasure…Her fiercest hope? That she will find a man. What she doesn’t know yet…that she will never again live in Santo Domingo, her own heart” (Diaz 164). After all that Beli has been through, the reader is left feeling saddened and sorry for Oscar’s mother. Diaz does a fantastic job of describing how Beli is after her terrible incidents. The author uses metaphors, a simile, descriptive writing, and dramatic irony. This passage relates to the theme of heartbreak. Oscar and Lola have both faced a heartbreak one way or another, and it is revealed that their mother has experienced the same, except Beli lost more than just a man. Beli lost her love for the Gangster, but Beli also lost the love of her home. Santo Domingo had been Beli’s home for years, but after all the events, Trujillo finds it safer for Beli to live in New York. In Oscar Wao, heartbreaks are always around the corner, and Beli is stripped from her only true love, Santo Domingo.


message 25: by 03jarrettp (new)

03jarrettp | 17 comments The novel I am reading, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz, is packed with powerful quotes and passages from what we have read so far, but I believe the passage that shines as the most impactful statement throughout the book. It is the turning point for our main character, Oscar, as he goes from being this stud who gets all of the ladies to being an overweight high schooler whose only love is video games even though he is searching for love. His friends are the only things he can count on. Al and Miggs are also nerdy guys like him so they click, but Oscar finds that it is not as it seems. He begins to think about it all,
"And right there he learned something about his friends he'd never known (or at least never admitted to himself). Right there he had an epiphany that echoed through his fat self. He realized his fucked-up comic-book-reading, role-playing-game-loving, no-sports-playing friends were embarrassed by him"(Diaz 29).
This is his first realization that his "friends", the only thing he can count on, flake on him because they are embarrassed by him. What makes them better? They share the same interests and are the same type of people. This relates to the overall plot and theme as it is all about a boy struggling to find himself and his love. His friends refused to be seen with him while they are with their girlfriends and that is double discouragement. The people he trusted most are embarrassed by him and he can't find a girlfriend. Oscar is a strong kid if he can take all of this and still be standing. Yes, he may be hurt, but he's not out and I commend him greatly for this.


message 26: by 03dylanc (new)

03dylanc | 22 comments In the Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov, multiple events are occurring that physically can't happen. However, in a conversation between Ivan and the Master, two people who have been affected by the recent murders in one way or another, the whole plot is tied together with sense. The master says to Ivan with conviction, "it's was Satan whom you met last night at Patriarches' Pond." Even though it seems absurd, especially to Ivan a atheist, it completely shocks the reader and for the reader, it ironically becomes the logical explanation to everything that is occurring.


message 27: by 03dylanc (new)

03dylanc | 22 comments In the Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov, multiple events are occurring that physically can't happen. However, in a conversation between Ivan and the Master, two people who have been affected by the recent murders in one way or another, the whole plot is tied together with sense. The master says to Ivan with conviction, "it's was Satan whom you met last night at Patriarches' Pond." Even though it seems absurd, especially to Ivan a atheist, it completely shocks the reader and for the reader, it ironically becomes the logical explanation to everything that is occurring.


message 28: by 03dylanc (new)

03dylanc | 22 comments In the Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov, multiple events are occurring that physically can't happen. However, in a conversation between Ivan and the Master, two people who have been affected by the recent murders in one way or another, the whole plot is tied together with sense. The master says to Ivan with conviction, "it's was Satan whom you met last night at Patriarches' Pond." Even though it seems absurd, especially to Ivan a atheist, it completely shocks the reader and for the reader, it ironically becomes the logical explanation to everything that is occurring.


message 29: by 03dylanc (new)

03dylanc | 22 comments In the Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov, multiple events are occurring that physically can't happen. However, in a conversation between Ivan and the Master, two people who have been affected by the recent murders in one way or another, the whole plot is tied together with sense. The master says to Ivan with conviction, "it's was Satan whom you met last night at Patriarches' Pond." Even though it seems absurd, especially to Ivan a atheist, it completely shocks the reader and for the reader, it ironically becomes the logical explanation to everything that is occurring.


message 30: by 03dylanc (new)

03dylanc | 22 comments In the Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov, multiple events are occurring that physically can't happen. However, in a conversation between Ivan and the Master, two people who have been affected by the recent murders in one way or another, the whole plot is tied together with sense. The master says to Ivan with conviction, "it's was Satan whom you met last night at Patriarches' Pond." Even though it seems absurd, especially to Ivan a atheist, it completely shocks the reader and for the reader, it ironically becomes the logical explanation to everything that is occurring.


message 31: by Anibal (new)

Anibal Santana | 10 comments One passage that I found both powerful and beautiful in Dracula by Bram Stoker was

“At the first howl the horses began to strain and rear, but the driver spoke to them soothingly, and they quieted down, but shivered and sweated as though after a runaway from sudden fright. Then, far off in the distance, from the mountains on each side of us began a louder and a sharper howling, that of wolves, which affected both the horses and myself in the same way. For I was minded to jump from the caleche and run, whilst they reared again and plunged madly, so that the driver had to use all his great strength to keep them from bolting”

One reason why I found this to be beautiful and powerful, is because it shows how helpless Jonathan is. It lays a tone and it gives the reader an idea as to what's in store.


message 32: by Anibal (new)

Anibal Santana | 10 comments In response to Jason, I absolutely loved the passage you chose and had you not of, I probably would've, but I digress. I agree with the passage creating a sense of respect for the sailor in the face of uncertainty.


message 33: by 03caleng (new)

03caleng | 20 comments Calen Golden
Mrs. Amanatullah
English 2 (H)
1/25/15

A passage I found powerful in Dracula by Bram Stoker was, “Our nerves are not so calm and our blood not so bright than yours!’ Arthur turned to him and said:---‘If only you only knew how gladly I would die for her you would understand---“ (142).
This passage shows the powerful love of a young couple where the girl is sick and in need of immediate attention from loss of blood. In the passage, what the young man is saying is that he will do anything for the love of his life to keep her healthy. What ends up happening is he gives her an immense amount of blood and she gets better, but his willingness to just step up and be their for her when she needs him most is amazing.


message 34: by 03caleng (new)

03caleng | 20 comments 03jasonw wrote: "Jason Whitney
Amanatullah
Eng 2H
1/25/15

A passage I found to be rather powerful in, "Dracula," comes from a doomed sea-captain's log:

"4 August.—Still fog, which the sunrise cannot pierce. I kno..."


In response to what Jason says, I completely agree. From your passage I can totally see how much fear Dracula can bring and how the Captain continued his responsibilities instead of just suiciding into the water.


message 35: by 03NikoT (new)

03NikoT | 29 comments A particular quote I like from Dracula
"God preserve my sanity, for to this I am reduced. Safety and the assurance of safety are things of the past. Whist I live on here there is but one thing to hope for, that I may not go mad, if indeed I be not mad already. If I be same, then surely it is maddening to think that of all the foul things that lurk in this hateful place the Count is the least dreadful to me; that to him alone I can look for safety, even though this be only whilst I can serve his purpose. Great God! Merciful God! Let me be calm for out of that way lies madness indeed. I begin to get new lights on certain things which have puzzled me. Up to now I never quite knew what Shakespeare meant when he made Hamlet say:-
"My tablets! quick, my tablets!
'Tis meet that I put it down," etc.,"
This quote really describes the mental side of Dracula's castle. He's pleasing to God to save him, as he attempts to stay sane in a living hell. He begins to unravel even some things he wondered, as he relates to Hamlet, who also found sanity by recording his thoughts. This passage does a very good job of displaying the horror that is Dracula's lair.


message 36: by 03caleng (new)

03caleng | 20 comments Anibal wrote: "One passage that I found both powerful and beautiful in Dracula by Bram Stoker was

“At the first howl the horses began to strain and rear, but the driver spoke to them soothingly, and they quiete..."


To respond to Anibal's passage, I like how you interpreted this passage, but personally I would say that you didn't give enough credit to how it shows what is to come. In the story, Jonathan stays with Dracula and everything begins changing and weird things happen that Jonathan discovers. The passage you chose, I would say really foreshadows what is to come at Dracula's house. It is a commonality to use nature to foreshadow events because nature is always changing and can be used for good or bad. In this case the terror the wolves bring and the darkness of the forest of dark spooky events that are about to transpire.


message 37: by 03NikoT (new)

03NikoT | 29 comments In response to Calen, I agree the passage very well shows how powerful their love is, based on how prepared he is to give his life for hers.


message 38: by 03nascoa (new)

03nascoa | 15 comments "However hard Varenukha tried to pull down the peak of his cap to shade
his face and however much he waved the newspaper, Rimsky managed to discern an enormous bruise that covered most of the right side of his face, starting
at his nose. What was more, this normally ruddy-cheeked man now had an unhealthy chalky pallor and although the night was hot, he was wearing an old-fashioned striped cravat tied round his neck. If one added to this his newly acquired and repulsive habit of sucking his teeth, a distinct lowering and coarsening of his tone of voice and the furtive, shifty look in his eyes, it was safe to say that Ivan Savye-lich Varenukha was unrecognisable.
Something even more insistent was worrying Rimsky, but he could not put his finger on it however much he racked his brain or stared at Varenukha. He was only sure of one thing--that there was something peculiar and unnatural in the man's posture in that familiar chair." this quote helps with the immersion factor of the story. The story is very trippy due to its main conflict of spirit vs man and how it uses such a fine amount of detail. I believe that the authors use of imagery such as this quote is the reason this book appeals interest to a lot of readers.


message 39: by 03nascoa (new)

03nascoa | 15 comments In response to Dylan's comment I also really liked that passage due to its sense of irony and its logical explanation to the situation. I believe bulgakov's use of passages like this help the reader understand a lot more than a reader would otherwise.


message 40: by Wyatt (new)

Wyatt Bensing | 4 comments The passage when her dad dies was a great passage because it shows imagery and it impacts the reader by putting them in a weird world. This relates to the theme because family is always first.


message 41: by Juan (new)

Juan Santos | 4 comments “for an instant his father is a stranger, a man who has kept a secret, has survived a tragedy a man whose past he does not fully know. A man who is vulnerable, who has suffered in an inconceivable way….. Again instinct he tries to imagine life without his father, a world in which his father does not exist” ( Lahiri 123).Is one quote that i found powerful because it was when he gogol was viewing his father in a different way. Imagining how life would of been without him growing up. His father who had suffered a lot.


message 42: by Jadengrandey (new)

Jadengrandey | 10 comments A passage that I found to be powerful was Laura's conversation on the phone with her best friend Soli;"Then I call Soli and tell her I need a place to crash. Soli doesn't wait for me to finish my explanation.'Stay put!I'll be there in three seconds!'That's one thing about Soli; shes's never let me down." I found this passage to be beautiful and powerful because it is an example of the bond Soli and Laura have. Soli doesn't judge Laura for her homosexuality and is always there when Laura needs her to be. Their friendship is inspiring and represents what every friendship should be like.


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