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Publishing and Promoting > Listing the discount price

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message 1: by Morey (new)

Morey | 24 comments This might fall into the "dumb question" category, but I'm going to go ahead and ask it anyway. :)

Right now I have two books, both listed at $8.95 for print and $2.99 for Kindle. I've been running promos for one of them at $.99, and when I've put them up on promo sites, I've been saying, "$2.99 regular price, on sale for $.99," which seems pretty obvious and honest to me.

But meanwhile, Amazon itself counts the print price as "regular" and thus actual page says, "Save $7.96 (89%)." I feel a bit skeezy about listing a promo or ad that reads, "$8.95 regular price, on sale for $.99," but am I shooting myself in the foot by not doing that? Is the standard practice my original instinct or what Amazon does?


message 2: by Ken (last edited Jan 20, 2015 02:12PM) (new)

Ken Grace | 1 comments Morey wrote: "This might fall into the "dumb question" category, but I'm going to go ahead and ask it anyway. :)

Right now I have two books, both listed at $8.95 for print and $2.99 for Kindle. I've been runnin..."


An interesting question indeed. As you have no control over what Amazon lists your book at, you will have to leave that as is, but it doesn't mean you can't advertise it the way you have suggested (what you feel comfortable with) in your other promotional material. In fact, I believe some book promoting sites actually request that you list the usual eBook price when submitting your information.

Best wishes.
Ken


message 3: by Alex (new)

Alex Morritt (alexmorritt) | 15 comments Morey wrote: "This might fall into the "dumb question" category, but I'm going to go ahead and ask it anyway. :)

Right now I have two books, both listed at $8.95 for print and $2.99 for Kindle. I've been runnin..."


Hi Morey,

Maybe it's worth considering discounting both the Print and Kindle versions of your book simultaneously, so as not to have an absurd situation (like the one you have illustrated) where it looks as if an US$ 8.95 book has been discounted right down to just US$ 0.99.

Currently your Kindle version when discounted is 33% of the regular price which (if you keep the discount % the same) would equate to US$ 2.95 for the print version.

It would be interesting to see how the Amazon ticker would relate to those dual price changes.

Good luck :-)

Alex


message 4: by Ken (new)

Ken (kendoyle) | 347 comments That verbiage is standard for an Amazon listing where there's both a print and a Kindle version. Most Amazon shoppers are probably used to it by now.


message 5: by Morey (last edited Jan 21, 2015 09:05AM) (new)

Morey | 24 comments Alex wrote: "Maybe it's worth considering discounting both the Print and Kindle versions of your book simultaneously, so as not to have an absurd situation (like the one you have illustrated)."

They're full-color children's books, so lowering the price on the print books isn't much of an option (though I just noticed Amazon themselves put one on sale for $6.85). My margins are pretty slim as it is, and the main reason I even made a print version is to lend legitimacy to the e-book.

I actually think in terms of numbers "$8.95 on sale for $.99" sounds a lot more impressive from an advertising standpoint. Whether doing so is entirely kosher is another question. That's why I was curious to know what the industry standard was.


message 6: by Morey (new)

Morey | 24 comments At first I thought this was a pretty basic question, but the more I think about it, the more I realize how amorphous this entire topic is.

Even without getting promos involved, we can change the price of our ebooks at any time, and unless I'm missing it somewhere, the retailers don't let customers know what the previous prices were or if it's on sale. In fact, I've been thinking about raising the prices of both books to $3.99 as an experiment (I've heard many stories about people making more sales after raising prices).

So given that, in theory you could put on your ads pretty much anything it's ever sold for. So how do lists with requirements like, "Must be at least 50% off" keep track? If I did that experiment and then tried to run a $1.99 promo, would they consider $3.99 or $2.99 the "original price?"

Can open. Worms everywhere!


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