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The Warning on the Window (Judy Bolton Mysteries, #20)
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#20: Warning on the Window > Chapter 18: The Warning on the Window - Summary

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William Land (williamland) | 1281 comments Mod
Chapter 18: The Right Road

Judy didn't recognize the voice on the phone and thinks that someone she knows should have called her about Peter. Suspicious, she calls the hospital to confirm the information, reaching her father who reassures her that Peter is still improving. Judy and Roberta barely make the train to Westlake and discuss the case on the way. Judy finally realizes why the first warning faded away. It was written in steam and the steam evaporated when the coffeepot was turned off. Judy also decides that since she mentioned driving to Westlake in front of the workers, the car trouble and phony call were meant to keep her from following the clue. At the train station there is a goldfish pond that fascinates Roberta and while looking into it, something splashes into the water. Arriving in Westlake, the two look around, and quickly find the College Shop which is open.

Margaret sets us up for the next book here with Roberta mentioning that she will marry young so she won't have to board in people's homes. We realize that although Judy and Peter are good to her, she knows that it is not the same as having parents and a home of her own.

It has been exactly one year since Judy took the train to Westlake in the Clue in the Patchwork Quilt. In that book we learn train trip took is five hours round trip. This trip seems to take be almost identical, leaving in the morning and arriving before lunch.

The next morning, after a quick visit to Peter, Judy finds that her car won't start. She decides to take a train to Westlake instead. Just before the train is to depart, Judy is paged for a telephone call. The caller tells her that she is needed at the hospital right away because Peter has taken a turn for the worse. Before Judy can ask any questions, the phone line is dead.


message 2: by Rachelle (new) - added it

Rachelle | 74 comments Mod
Is the last part out of order? It should be before the beginning you have here.


William Land (williamland) | 1281 comments Mod
Rachelle wrote: "Is the last part out of order? It should be before the beginning you have here."

To whom is this comment directed, Rae? If you mean for it to be for me, I haven't any idea what you are saying.

I double-checked in light of what I think you are saying and the chapter summary postings for Chapter 17 and 18 are correct as posted from Terry's website for the Judy Bolton books summaries.


message 4: by Rachelle (new) - added it

Rachelle | 74 comments Mod
It may be that is the way the summary was written but if you read what is written the last paragraph should be before the first one. The last paragraph refers to a phone call she receives and the first said she did not recognize the voice on the phone. It also says she calls the hospital to check on Peter's condition.


Rebekah (rebroxanna) | 661 comments Rachelle wrote: "It may be that is the way the summary was written but if you read what is written the last paragraph should be before the first one. The last paragraph refers to a phone call she receives and the f..."
You are right, Rachelle.


Rebekah (rebroxanna) | 661 comments In this chapter, I like that Judy's not going to college is addressed. She says her father really wanted her to go to college and sometimes she wishes she would have. Roberta reminds her that then she couldn't have married Peter. But Judy counters that they could have waited. Of course, that would have made this series go into an entirely different and probably unadvisable direction. So Judy shrugs the idea off by saying she's glad she didn't wait to marry Peter.
I think it sends a good message to young readers that Judy did not forgo college lightly and sometimes regrets not going even though she is happily married to Peter.


message 7: by Faye (new)

Faye Kisker | 486 comments I did think I had missed a chapter when I started reading since the car not starting hadn't been addressed but when I read the last paragraph and saw the part about going to Westlake in the morning, I knew that somehow the last paragraph was supposed to be first.


message 8: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 168 comments I disagree about the college comment. Judy' response to Roberta's remark and Roberta's remark, itself, typifies the prevailing thought at that time that it was more important for women to marry ( and marry young) than it was for them to go to college and (horror of horrors) to have a career and delay marriage and ( another horror
of horrors) possibly delay having a family.


Rebekah (rebroxanna) | 661 comments Kathleen wrote: "I disagree about the college comment. Judy' response to Roberta's remark and Roberta's remark, itself, typifies the prevailing thought at that time that it was more important for women to marry ( a..."
I like that Margaret makes clear that Judy had the option of going to college and was encouraged to do so. Judy says she could have waited to marry, but preferred not to do so. I think it is good that it was Judy's choice and she had other options besides marriage.
It is certainly true that only a low percentage of women went to college at this time. But many books aimed at young girls have the heroines going to college. Cherry Ames, Judy Abbot and her friend Sally from the Jean Webster books, Anne of Green Gables, Ruth Fielding etc. And decades earlier than this book.


William Land (williamland) | 1281 comments Mod
I, too, disagree about the college comment. I know it was a sign of the times for some girls and/or women not to go to college, preferring to get their MRS. However, many of these girls did not earn their own money, being dependent on a husband. This is fine if life doesn't intervene with a husband not able to earn a living for any reason (disability, laziness, death) and divorce.

Every person, including females, should have their own money. This is best accomplished by earning it.

Every person, including males, should be able to be self-sufficient in their own home by making even basic meals, doing light housekeeping and laundry and grocery shopping. These tasks should not be considered "women's work," because every person must be able to fend for herself or himself.


William Land (williamland) | 1281 comments Mod
Rachelle wrote: "It may be that is the way the summary was written but if you read what is written the last paragraph should be before the first one. The last paragraph refers to a phone call she receives and the f..."

I don't see that the summary paragraphs are out of order. It makes more exciting reading to have the summary as written with the cliffhanger sentence at the end.


message 12: by Beverly (new)

Beverly | 1167 comments Rachelle wrote: "Is the last part out of order? It should be before the beginning you have here."

I wrote the original summaries and checked my document. The following paragraph is the end of chapter 17 summary.

The next morning, after a quick visit to Peter, Judy finds that her car won’t start. She decides to take a train to Westlake instead. Just before the train is to depart, Judy is paged for a telephone call. The caller tells her that she is needed at the hospital right away because Peter has taken a turn for the worse. Before Judy can ask any questions, the phone line is dead.

The chapter 18 summary is what is posted for chapter 18 here except for the last paragraph.


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