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Fahrenheit 451
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Books of the Month > Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury - Nov 2020 Adult BOM (starts 2 Nov)

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Guy Montag is a fireman. In his world, where television rules and literature is on the brink of extinction, firemen start fires rather than put them out. His job is to destroy the most illegal of commodities, the printed book, along with the houses in which they are hidden.

Montag never questions the destruction and ruin his actions produce, returning each day to his bland life and wife, Mildred, who spends all day with her television 'family'. But then he meets an eccentric young neighbor, Clarisse, who introduces him to a past where people did not live in fear and to a present where one sees the world through the ideas in books instead of the mindless chatter of television.

When Mildred attempts suicide and Clarisse suddenly disappears, Montag begins to question everything he has ever known.


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Chapter Breakdown

Date Chapters %age MPDQs

2 Nov Part One 42% Cat
3 Nov Part Two 68% Lisa (Aussie Girl)
4 Nov Part Three 100% Judith



Guidance for DQ setters
Aim for a reasonable number of questions: 4 - 5 is typical. Please don't post too many - any more than 7 gets unwieldy!
Use consecutive numbering of the DQs for your days. So, for example, if Day One is posted as questions 1-4, Day Two should start at number 5 etc.
Don't worry too much about your questions: you aren't being tested on how clever your questions are!
Hints and tips:
- Is there a quote that jumped out at you? Use that in a question.
- What about the characters - do they generate strong feelings? No feelings? - either way, we can explore that!
- What about that plot twist?!
- Explore the writing style: is there an unusual structure being used? what's the tone of voice like? or the point of view?

Want more information about how NBRC runs their Book of the Month discussions? Check out the information here


message 3: by Moderators of NBRC, Challenger-in-Chief (last edited Oct 26, 2020 03:25AM) (new) - added it

Moderators of NBRC | 31349 comments Mod
Volunteers

Judith
Lisa (Aussie Girl)
Cat


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Moderators of NBRC | 31349 comments Mod
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Sammy (sammystarbuck) | 6091 comments Been meaning to re-read this one for about a decade, so I guess I'll play :)


Judith (brownie72011) | 5471 comments Mod
Who can say no to Bradbury?

I'm in and can write DQs


Lisa - (Aussie Girl) | 5213 comments I can volunteer for DQ's - Team Tienuurtj


Laurie B | 705 comments I read this about a year ago, so I’ll try to join the discussion.


message 9: by Niquole (new) - added it

Niquole Abram (queenofheartz44) | 1 comments Love this book, it’s by far my favorite! Looking forward to this.


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Slightly uneven breaks, but it's not a long book and way easier to use the parts than try to do a sub-section in Part One.


message 11: by Kim (new) - added it

Kim I'm really looking forward to this re-read. I read it when i was in 7th grade; so much has changed it'll be cool to learn my thoughts on it now.


Meghan Q (meghan_q) | 4 comments Kim wrote: "I'm really looking forward to this re-read. I read it when i was in 7th grade; so much has changed it'll be cool to learn my thoughts on it now." I totally agree! This is a re-read for me too from my freshman year of high school but it will definitely be interesting to see how my perspective and thoughts on this book have evolved.


Lisa - (Aussie Girl) | 5213 comments First time reading for me. I've read the first part and wow, even though it was written fifty years ago there are still so many parallels to the world now. Looking forward to discussing with you all.


message 14: by Cat (new) - rated it 5 stars

Cat (cat_uk) | 7338 comments Mod
DQs: Part One

1. What are your thoughts on the setting of the novel? Bearing in mind it is nearly 70 years since publication, how well has it lasted the passing of time - which of the projected changes in society have or haven't come true?

2. What are your thoughts on Guy Montag? Would you have preferred to see why he first took a book home, or do you like being in the middle of this second jolt to his life?

3. Montag has interactions with three women in this section: Clarisse (is she the original manic pixie dream girl?!), poor Mildred and the old woman who self-immolates. How do these three women help shape the trajectory of Montag's life?

4. I noticed that Bradbury uses a lot of nature metaphors and descriptors, particularly when describing the horrific, mechanical parts of the world (like the snakes in the medical machine). Why do you think he makes these language choices? Do you enjoy the writing?


Judith (brownie72011) | 5471 comments Mod
DQs: Part One

1. What are your thoughts on the setting of the novel? Bearing in mind it is nearly 70 years since publication, how well has it lasted the passing of time - which of the projected changes in society have or haven't come true?

I think it is generic enough of a place (could be a neighborhood and city anywhere) and it stands the test of time. His projections of what society would become are not so far fetched. The dependence on electronics (thinking of Mildred here) isn't far off and neither is wall size tvs/media walls. Or even multiple media walls in the same room.

2. What are your thoughts on Guy Montag? Would you have preferred to see why he first took a book home, or do you like being in the middle of this second jolt to his life?
I think I like being in the middle unless the novel was going to be a lot longer. I find Guy interesting and relatable. He's a thinker and how can I not like a character who wants to read books even if it's against the law.

3. Montag has interactions with three women in this section: Clarisse (is she the original manic pixie dream girl?!), poor Mildred and the old woman who self-immolates. How do these three women help shape the trajectory of Montag's life?
Clarisse seems to represent what could of been or should be if society was still permitted non-conformity. Mildred I think represents what happens when you release free thought and personality for conformity with the price of happiness and well-being. The old woman represents free thought, individuality, etc is sometimes worth more than a life full of oppression.

4. I noticed that Bradbury uses a lot of nature metaphors and descriptors, particularly when describing the horrific, mechanical parts of the world (like the snakes in the medical machine). Why do you think he makes these language choices? Do you enjoy the writing?
That we are trading the natural world for a mechanical one and the price is higher than most of us realize.

I've loved Bradbury since school days and only appreciate him more now that I'm older.


message 16: by Sammy (last edited Nov 02, 2020 05:15AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Sammy (sammystarbuck) | 6091 comments 1. What are your thoughts on the setting of the novel? Bearing in mind it is nearly 70 years since publication, how well has it lasted the passing of time - which of the projected changes in society have or haven't come true?

Well, tv turned out to not quite be the Big Bad Evil that Bradbury thought it would become, but if you substitute internet for tv, I think he hit rather close to the mark.
After all this time it is still a fantastic book.

2. What are your thoughts on Guy Montag? Would you have preferred to see why he first took a book home, or do you like being in the middle of this second jolt to his life?

Guy is - for a protagonist - a very passive character. We very rarely see him take action of any kind, and this finding out things after the fact fits with that.

3. Montag has interactions with three women in this section: Clarisse (is she the original manic pixie dream girl?!), poor Mildred and the old woman who self-immolates. How do these three women help shape the trajectory of Montag's life?

As above, Guy is extremely passive in this book, especially early on. If you think of him being in a boat on a river, he doesn't seem to have any oars. Instead these women (and the male characters too) act as currents, taking him from place to place in the story without any real effort on his part.

4. I noticed that Bradbury uses a lot of nature metaphors and descriptors, particularly when describing the horrific, mechanical parts of the world (like the snakes in the medical machine). Why do you think he makes these language choices? Do you enjoy the writing?

Bradbury is very big on imagery, and the metaphors etc. are a good way of getting that across. I'm a huge fan of his writing in general, though strangely, I don't enjoy him as much in audio. there's something about print that just works so much better with his books.


Paula Ramos (pauraso) | 9 comments Hi everyone! This is my first time reading Fahrenheit 451 and my first time participating in this group, so I'm really excited!

1. When I first started it I was confused about the time setting, to be honest. It took me a few pages to get settled into this world as I felt like I didn't have enough information about it. Although it's a very pessimistic view and perhaps cynical on society, there were some lines that were reminiscent of our times. It is true that in the last decades we've favoured entertainment that is fastly consumed. We've gone from films to TV shows to youtube videos to TikTok. From books to blogs to facebook to twitter. I don't think this is a bad thing per se, and I am definitely pro technology, but it made me reflect on the media I consume and whether it brings value into my life. And although I think Bradbury was right in seeing this trend towards fast-paced life so early on, I think today's society is not as bleak as portrayed by the book. In fact, I just read yesterday that book sales went up this year because of the quarantine!

2. I wish we knew a bit more about Guy Montag. I feel like he doesn't really have a personality. But I really really liked that it was revealed later that he's been taking books home for a while. It gives the impression that this urge or curiosity has always been inside him, dormant, and it's been growing and growing until it finally exploded.

3. Indeed these three characters are the precursors of Montag's "awakening". I personally found Mildred to be insufferable and incredibly frustrating, but at the end of the day it's what Montag seems to feel towards her: frustration at her numbness and absence.
The old woman didn't have as much importance herself as Guy's trauma after watching her die. I wonder how this will affect him and how it'll play out later on.
And finally Clarisse... the original manic pixie dream girl sounds about right. I feel like this book has this condescending tone of "no one understands me, no one appreciates good literature, we are doomed because everyone is stupid" and this feeling is expressed through Clarisse's character. She's different, she smells flowers and looks at the sky and asks weird questions. If it went on it maybe would've gotten annoying, but I didn't expect her to suddenly die. Especially because the only reason that she died is to give Montag a motive to snap and do something, so it felt unfair.

4. I can't really comment that much on the writing because I'm reading a Spanish translation, but there is a lot of mentions of nature, and especially of snakes. I'm not sure of why he made these language choices, but the constant mention of snakes gives the text an unsettling tone, like something is constantly moving underneath the surface.

I can't wait to see what happens next, it took all my self-restrain to stop myself from reading the next part before posting here.
(also sorry if I made any mistakes, English isn't my first language). I'm looking forward to reading everyone's thoughts!


message 18: by Cat (new) - rated it 5 stars

Cat (cat_uk) | 7338 comments Mod
Sammy wrote: "Well, tv turned out to not quite be the Big Bad Evil that Bradbury thought it would become, but if you substitute internet for tv, I think he hit rather close to the mark...."

He didn't get the internet fully, no, but there's a bit where the newscaster is leaving a blank and the machine fills in "Mrs Montag" - personalisation of feeds is there! ;P


message 19: by Cat (new) - rated it 5 stars

Cat (cat_uk) | 7338 comments Mod
@Paula - like you I agree that Bradbury's view is gloomier than it's turned out. I was interested by Beatty's explanation of why firemen starting burning things - to remove anything objectionable from mainstream media. That, at least, is different to what we have now - we still have space for different opinions, which is (I think) a healthier way for society to go. Granted, many of the online conversations good do with a lot more civility though!


message 20: by Lisa - (Aussie Girl) (last edited Nov 02, 2020 03:07PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lisa - (Aussie Girl) | 5213 comments 1. What are your thoughts on the setting of the novel? Bearing in mind it is nearly 70 years since publication, how well has it lasted the passing of time - which of the projected changes in society have or haven't come true?

The book was written in 1951 and the world was coming out of the horror of Two World Wars, the rise of Communism and the beginning of the Cold War. Not a fun time and quite a lot of dystopian fiction was written around this time set in the future and the depiction being very negative. And in some ways the predictions haven't been too far off the mark. The televisions on all the time with banal content (I'm thinking reality shows) and the interactive speaker reminded me of Google Home and predictive text. And there are still many places in the world where to think and do outside the Government line means imprisonment or death.

2. What are your thoughts on Guy Montag? Would you have preferred to see why he first took a book home, or do you like being in the middle of this second jolt to his life?

Guy seems to be an everyman character. Goes along passively on the surface but underneath he can't stop his thoughts or doubts. He doesn't at first impression seem like a mover and shaker so it fits that he has been surreptitiously taking the books. His reaction can be compared to a slow burn of a fire, slow to catch but then bursting into flames. Maybe this is what the author intended.

3. Montag has interactions with three women in this section: Clarisse (is she the original manic pixie dream girl?!), poor Mildred and the old woman who self-immolates. How do these three women help shape the trajectory of Montag's life?

I really like what Sammy said here - Montag is the passive character and his thoughts and reactions are modelled on the contribution of these three women characters. And it is then his Boss that finally seems to ignite him into action. Boy, nearly tripping over all the metaphors here.



4. I noticed that Bradbury uses a lot of nature metaphors and descriptors, particularly when describing the horrific, mechanical parts of the world (like the snakes in the medical machine). Why do you think he makes these language choices? Do you enjoy the writing?

Well, snakes makes me think of the original sin, they've had a bad wrap since time infinitum and are often used as a metaphor for evil. I'm enjoying the writing as it makes me think about what I'm reading a bit more than usual.


Lisa - (Aussie Girl) | 5213 comments DQ'S DAY 2

5. Part 2 is entitled The Sieve and the Sand. How does this relate to what happens in this section? What more do we find out about Montag and the situation?

6. Montag shares his concerns with his wife Millie. How are their reactions different and how does this compare to other characters throughout the book?

7. Montag reaches out to Professor Faber to help him understand his newly found feelings. The Professor has his own opinion on the circumstances and how they must proceed. Discuss the Professor's role in the book including the following quote -
"The good writer's touch life often. The mediocre ones run a quick hand over her. The bad ones rape her and leave her for the flies."

8. Out of all the books and literature in the world, Bradbury chooses passages from the Bible and Matthew Arnold's poem Dover Beach as part of this section. Why do you think he used these works and how do they impact what happens in the story here.

9. For a Fire Chief, Captain Beatty seems very well read and taunts Montag as they approach his house. It seems that the gig is up for Montag, what do you think is going to happen? Is there any chance at this point that Montag and Millie will survive at the end of the book?


message 22: by Kim (new) - added it

Kim Qs: Part One

1. What are your thoughts on the setting of the novel? Bearing in mind it is nearly 70 years since publication, how well has it lasted the passing of time - which of the projected changes in society have or haven't come true?
I feel like there are uncanny parallels considering the passage of time and the lack of knowledge Bradbury could have had on the advances in technology. Partially stoked by my recent watching of "the social dilemma" on Netflix but the dissociation with others around us is not entirely off base.

2. What are your thoughts on Guy Montag? Would you have preferred to see why he first took a book home, or do you like being in the middle of this second jolt to his life?
I liked the middle jolt because you don't go through all the awkward "guilt" and "what if's" and paranoia associated with breaking the rules the first time. being the second round of questioning his role in life also humanizes Guy more because you can relate more to the fact of his questioning than his blind following.

3. Montag has interactions with three women in this section: Clarisse (is she the original manic pixie dream girl?!), poor Mildred and the old woman who self-immolates. How do these three women help shape the trajectory of Montag's life?
I feel like Clarisse instills wonder and the old-woman is his reality. Mildred represents his life before he "got woke."


message 23: by Nina (new) - rated it 3 stars

Nina | 3 comments DQ's DAY 1

Hi everyone! This is my first time participating in this group so I'm super excited. So far, the first read seems great - a true classic that I've never gotten to but should have.

1. What are your thoughts on the setting of the novel? Bearing in mind it is nearly 70 years since publication, how well has it lasted the passing of time - which of the projected changes in society have or haven't come true?

I think that the setting is general enough to stand the test of time. Like many people have already pointed out, the dystopian future that Bradbury predicted hasn't exactly come to life. The television had it's golden age but didn't become the big bad evil that the author predicted. However, thanks to the internet, we are largely living in an imaginary world and tend to be glued to fast entertainment, so in some ways, the changes have come true. Thankfully, we are a lot more conscious of these problems than the characters of the book.


2. What are your thoughts on Guy Montag? Would you have preferred to see why he first took a book home, or do you like being in the middle of this second jolt to his life?

Guy is a very passive protagonist. I think the story works the way it's been written, throwing the reader in the middle of events, but I would very much like to find out more about the character and his inner world in the next chapters.



3. Montag has interactions with three women in this section: Clarisse (is she the original manic pixie dream girl?!), poor Mildred and the old woman who self-immolates. How do these three women help shape the trajectory of Montag's life?

Even though Clarisse is an important character, I find her very irritating. I think that she might well be the original manic pixie dream girl. I think that at the time of publication of the book the readers might have found here a lot more likable, but considering that this stock character is already exhausted, it seems a bit too artificial to a contemporary reader. Mildred is an infuriating character, as well, but at the end of chapter one, she seems to be taken out from her dazed world of mindless chatter of the TV, and I hope that there is some character development to be expected. The old woman seems to be somewhat of a last straw to Guy. All of these women are interesting and clearly necessary for Guy to get where he needs to go.


4. I noticed that Bradbury uses a lot of nature metaphors and descriptors, particularly when describing the horrific, mechanical parts of the world (like the snakes in the medical machine). Why do you think he makes these language choices? Do you enjoy the writing?

I noticed this, but I don't really know what to say about it... Maybe it's his way of showing that the humankind has drifted apart from the nature and animals? That isn't exactly the theme of the book but who knows.


Judith (brownie72011) | 5471 comments Mod
DQ Day 2 - Part 2

5. Part 2 is entitled The Sieve and the Sand. How does this relate to what happens in this section? What more do we find out about Montag and the situation?

I think it relates to the futility of the situation Montag is in in trying to change society's view on books? Like the futility of trying to find the dime in the sand when he was a child.

6. Montag shares his concerns with his wife Millie. How are their reactions different and how does this compare to other characters throughout the book?
I think she is afraid and doesn't want to deviate from the norm and what is expected of them. And she's in complete denial of what she's done to herself with the pills and how unhappy she is. She is really similar to her friends that come by for a visit. They seem to like their bubble of deniability.
Montag finally seems to want to do something to help improve himself and society. And thinks the risk might be worth it.

7. Montag reaches out to Professor Faber to help him understand his newly found feelings. The Professor has his own opinion on the circumstances and how they must proceed. Discuss the Professor's role in the book including the following quote -
"The good writer's touch life often. The mediocre ones run a quick hand over her. The bad ones rape her and leave her for the flies."

The Professor is a sounding board and voice of reason/experience for Montag being someone who remembers a time before things were quite as dire as they are now. As for the quote, maybe a good writer affects reader lives forever, the book resonates with them long after they finished reading. A mediocre one may impact a person's thoughts for awhile but then fades away mostly forgotten. A bad one can destroy a person?

8. Out of all the books and literature in the world, Bradbury chooses passages from the Bible and Matthew Arnold's poem Dover Beach as part of this section. Why do you think he used these works and how do they impact what happens in the story here.
I think they are foils of one another. The Bible is a religious text with followers around the world and Dover Beach describes a world where people trade religion and faith for science and technology leading to a less happy existence. I think Bradbury might be saying society needs a balance.

9. For a Fire Chief, Captain Beatty seems very well read and taunts Montag as they approach his house. It seems that the gig is up for Montag, what do you think is going to happen? Is there any chance at this point that Montag and Millie will survive at the end of the book?
I've read the book before so I'm going to skip this one.


message 25: by Steven (last edited Nov 03, 2020 10:36AM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Steven (gallifreyan1218) | 4917 comments DQs: Part One

1. What are your thoughts on the setting of the novel? Bearing in mind it is nearly 70 years since publication, how well has it lasted the passing of time - which of the projected changes in society have or haven't come true?
Um, I think it was a very insightful look at a future that probably seemed very unpredictable to the everyday person. He had some really clever ideas that are really similar to reality. And I'm a little jealous we don't have mechanical dogs. I mean, I'd still have real ones, but it would be cool to have a pet mechanical dog as well. Maybe a nice one though. LOL

2. What are your thoughts on Guy Montag? Would you have preferred to see why he first took a book home, or do you like being in the middle of this second jolt to his life?
I kind of would have liked to see more of the progression, but I think the big reveal - that it wasn't just ONE book, but many - wouldn't have had the same impact.

3. Montag has interactions with three women in this section: Clarisse (is she the original manic pixie dream girl?!), poor Mildred and the old woman who self-immolates. How do these three women help shape the trajectory of Montag's life?
100% agree with Sammy - he's shaped by the people in his life and doesn't do much shaping of the world around him on his own- though I feel like he WANTS to, based off of this section. He wants to understand. He even comments on how they could read the books and maybe find a way to leave that information to someone coming after them.

Also, i do NOT like Mildred. She says she likes to go out and drive fast and hit animals... for fun/to feel better.

4. I noticed that Bradbury uses a lot of nature metaphors and descriptors, particularly when describing the horrific, mechanical parts of the world (like the snakes in the medical machine). Why do you think he makes these language choices? Do you enjoy the writing?
I'm not a huge fan of the writing, mostly because there's so much description and metaphor and blathering on and on. Hoping it picks up, as so far, I've struggled to get to this point.


Paula Ramos (pauraso) | 9 comments DQ Day 2 - Part 2

5. Part 2 is entitled The Sieve and the Sand. How does this relate to what happens in this section? What more do we find out about Montag and the situation?
I'm not that good at metaphors, to be honest, but I think Judith's interpretation is correct. His efforts really seem futile, especially since he isn't even 100% convinced about it.

6. Montag shares his concerns with his wife Millie. How are their reactions different and how does this compare to other characters throughout the book?
Montag's reactions always surprise me, probably because we don't know much about his personality and I can't anticipate how he'll react to things. He seems to be very agitated and angry all of the time, and still I feel like hi isn't determined enough to make a change. Millie on the other hand reacts as if the ground beneath her feet is crumbling. She's in denial and clings to her normal 'sedated' life. It made me really sad how it felt like she couldn't comprehend what was happening and kept trying to act as if everything was normal.

7. Montag reaches out to Professor Faber to help him understand his newly found feelings. The Professor has his own opinion on the circumstances and how they must proceed. Discuss the Professor's role in the book including the following quote - "The good writer's touch life often. The mediocre ones run a quick hand over her. The bad ones rape her and leave her for the flies."
I think Faber's role in the book is that of a guide. Montag seems to feel lost and insecure about his ideas, and he needs an authoritative figure to tell him what to do, as he mentions himself when he says that he used to do whatever they told him and now he's doing what Faber tells him. As many people have said in this discussion, Guy is incredibly passive, and he definitely needs someone to push him.

8. Out of all the books and literature in the world, Bradbury chooses passages from the Bible and Matthew Arnold's poem Dover Beach as part of this section. Why do you think he used these works and how do they impact what happens in the story here.
I don't know the Dover Beach poem so I don't know, but the Bible is probably one of the most important pieces of literature of all times, so in a world where books are being destroyed I can see why it would have great importance. If there's something deeper there, I'm missing it.

9. For a Fire Chief, Captain Beatty seems very well read and taunts Montag as they approach his house. It seems that the gig is up for Montag, what do you think is going to happen? Is there any chance at this point that Montag and Millie will survive at the end of the book?
I don't know what Captain Beatty's deal is but he creeps me out. The fact that he is so well read made me thing that maybe he was secretly in Guy's side, but the way that he taunts Montag in this chapter was really menacing. I honestly have no idea what is going to happen. I think they'll find and burn Guy's books but maybe he'll manage to escape (?). But since Faber and Guy have no plan for now I don't know where the story is going. I'm also looking forward to finding out how Millie will react to the firemen barging into her house. Will she try to defend Guy or will she rat him out in hopes of saving herself?


Steven (gallifreyan1218) | 4917 comments DQs: Part Two

5. Part 2 is entitled The Sieve and the Sand. How does this relate to what happens in this section? What more do we find out about Montag and the situation?
It almost feels like a hopeless situation. The more he tries to put into understanding it, the more he's going to be frustrated by the way things are. The more sand you dump in, the faster it's seeping out. There's no way to fill it up. It's all pretty futile. :(

6. Montag shares his concerns with his wife Millie. How are their reactions different and how does this compare to other characters throughout the book?
She's happy being ignorant and, in my opinion, pretty amoral. She doesn't want to have to think or feel beyond her selfishness.
He's been awakened to the potential for more, and once you see that, if you're even slightly open to it, it's hard to settle for less.

7. Montag reaches out to Professor Faber to help him understand his newly found feelings. The Professor has his own opinion on the circumstances and how they must proceed. Discuss the Professor's role in the book including the following quote - "The good writer's touch life often. The mediocre ones run a quick hand over her. The bad ones rape her and leave her for the flies."
I like Faber. So far, he's the only interesting character, other than Clarisse. I don't really feel that anyone is fleshed out very much. It seems that Faber is the counterbalance to the firemen/wife perspective, continuing where Clarisse left off.

8. Out of all the books and literature in the world, Bradbury chooses passages from the Bible and Matthew Arnold's poem Dover Beach as part of this section. Why do you think he used these works and how do they impact what happens in the story here. I feel like the Bible was used to show that if we do, as a society, decide to shun feelings and the written word and thinking, even something as highly regard as the Bible can become contraband or unacceptable. I think it was a little nod to how extreme something like this could go - just like Handmaid's Tale shows the opposite end of this spectrum. I think the Dover Beach poetry was decently emotional and he needed something emotional to make Clara tear up.

9. For a Fire Chief, Captain Beatty seems very well read and taunts Montag as they approach his house. It seems that the gig is up for Montag, what do you think is going to happen? Is there any chance at this point that Montag and Millie will survive at the end of the book?
He does seem very, very well read... which makes me wonder why. But it also appears that he's the opposite of Guy Montag in that reading and opening up to it didn't change him for the better, it just made him hate it all the more.
I really don't care what happens to Millie at all, as I think she's terrible. I hope Montag and Faber survive.


Alicia Ellsworth | 18 comments 5. Part 2 is entitled The Sieve and the Sand. How does this relate to what happens in this section? What more do we find out about Montag and the situation? I am not entirely sure I understand the book at all, but I'll give it a go answering here. It's almost futal, trying to change things. The sand just sifts through the sieve, much like what Montag is trying to figure out tries not to stick in his mind. Everyone has basically been programmed to think one way and most, like Millie, don't remember anything.

6. Montag shares his concerns with his wife Millie. How are their reactions different and how does this compare to other characters throughout the book? Having the books frightens Millie, but only because she would lose her "family" or rather her interaction with their "social media". Anything else Montaag tells her, she doesn't remember. Montag doesn't interact with "the family". Once he meets Clarisse, he is on a different plane than Millie.

7. Montag reaches out to Professor Faber to help him understand his newly found feelings. The Professor has his own opinion on the circumstances and how they must proceed. Discuss the Professor's role in the book including the following quote -
"The good writer's touch life often. The mediocre ones run a quick hand over her. The bad ones rape her and leave her for the flies."
The Professor is just that. He professes. He has the knowledge to remember things and Montag wants to know how to hold on to the sand in the sieve. He grew up believing books were a big waste of time and nothing about them was real. But after Clarisse and his new knowledge that maybe not everything is as it seems, he wants to know. All the authors that are mentioned as the books they burn "Friday is Faulkner", were all greats, they would touch life often.

8. Out of all the books and literature in the world, Bradbury chooses passages from the Bible and Matthew Arnold's poem Dover Beach as part of this section. Why do you think he used these works and how do they impact what happens in the story here. I don't know that poem so I really can't say but maybe because the poem and the Bible are tragic. The life they are living without books is tragic.

9. For a Fire Chief, Captain Beatty seems very well read and taunts Montag as they approach his house. It seems that the gig is up for Montag, what do you think is going to happen? Is there any chance at this point that Montag and Millie will survive at the end of the book? I already finished the book, Beatty didn't really give himself away to me. He was more of a pompous ass, kind of a "I get to remember all this knowledge because I am the leader but you still don't get to know."


Judith (brownie72011) | 5471 comments Mod
DQs Day 3 - Part 3

10.) With all of the current unrest what do you think Beatty's statement:
"for everyone nowadays knows, absolutely is certain, that nothing will ever happen to me. Others die, I go on. There are no consequences and no responsibilities."
is it still relevant and timely?

11.) What did you think about Montag's flight from the city? Did the search go how you expected?

12.) The river/railroad tracks have groups of Ivy League educated "bums". Why do you think Bradbury was so specific about their backgrounds and what do you think they represent?

13.) Final thoughts on book? Did it stand the test of time?

Bonus Question: The version I read had an introduction written by Neil Gaiman. In it he said:
"If someone tells you what a story is about, they are probably right.
If someone tells you that is all the story is about, they are very definitely wrong."
Do you agree? Why do you think he included this in his introduction to Fahrenheit 451?



Saar The Book owl | 422 comments I'm a bit late for this one, but I've started the book. Can I still join for this?


Judith (brownie72011) | 5471 comments Mod
DQs Day 3 - Part 3

10.) With all of the current unrest what do you think Beatty's statement:
"for everyone nowadays knows, absolutely is certain, that nothing will ever happen to me. Others die, I go on. There are no consequences and no responsibilities."
is it still relevant and timely?

This just made me think of all of the fights in the US about when and where you need to wear a mask (assuming you don't have a legit medical breathing issue). So many people are just focused on them and not on how some fairly mild requests can help prevent others from being sick. And the fact this was written almost 70 years ago and is still relevant and relatable makes me sad.

11.) What did you think about Montag's flight from the city? Did the search go how you expected?
This is a reread but I remember being surprised the Hound didn't go in the apartment. Or that after the Hound stopped there, police didn't go in Faber's apartment to be thorough.

12.) The river/railroad tracks have groups of Ivy League educated "bums". Why do you think Bradbury was so specific about their backgrounds and what do you think they represent?
I think they represent hope for the future and that not everything burned is lost. And their backgrounds being from such formally prestigious institutions I think was to show how completely society has abandoned things.

13.) Final thoughts on book? Did it stand the test of time?
I've always loved this book and Bradbury in general, but I know his style isn't for everyone. For the most part I think it holds up. The future he saw was based on where things were in the 1950's and some developments, like the internet and smart phones, couldn't been foreseen at the time.

Bonus Question: The version I read had an introduction written by Neil Gaiman. In it he said:
"If someone tells you what a story is about, they are probably right.
If someone tells you that is all the story is about, they are very definitely wrong."
Do you agree? Why do you think he included this in his introduction to Fahrenheit 451?

I do agree with Gaiman, at least for well written books. Like art, I think they can mean different things to different people and few things are as simple as they first seem. And I think this is especially true for Fahrenheit 451. Most people will say it's about book burning and censorship. Which it is, but it's also about much more than that.


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Cat (cat_uk) | 7338 comments Mod
Saar The Book owl wrote: "I'm a bit late for this one, but I've started the book. Can I still join for this?"

of course! :)


Steven (gallifreyan1218) | 4917 comments DQs: Part Three

10.) With all of the current unrest what do you think Beatty's statement:
"for everyone nowadays knows, absolutely is certain, that nothing will ever happen to me. Others die, I go on. There are no consequences and no responsibilities."
is it still relevant and timely?

Absolutely. Sounds exactly like a major name in politics currently. "No consequences, no responsibility, I'm the best, I'm invincible."

11.) What did you think about Montag's flight from the city? Did the search go how you expected?
I didn't really have expectations going in to this part, other than maybe thinking he wouldn't make it to the end.

12.) The river/railroad tracks have groups of Ivy League educated "bums". Why do you think Bradbury was so specific about their backgrounds and what do you think they represent?
He was making his point again that the masses tend to dismiss experts, educated people, if they don't say what the masses want to hear. Case in point: US Coronavirus response.


13.) Final thoughts on book? Did it stand the test of time?
I did not enjoy this book. It wasn't to do with the message or the world he built - that was intriguing. I just felt like the characters and storyline were shallow and the descriptors were too long and flowery. I was bored for most of it, so I'm just glad it was short. I probably would have enjoyed it 20 years ago in high school.

Bonus Question: The version I read had an introduction written by Neil Gaiman. In it he said:
"If someone tells you what a story is about, they are probably right.
If someone tells you that is all the story is about, they are very definitely wrong."
Do you agree? Why do you think he included this in his introduction to Fahrenheit 451?

I really liked that quote. It reminds us that everyone reads the same thing differently, takes different things from it, learns something different from it, and the book indicates that the value of reading and thinking and how individuals can provide that value uniquely from each other.


message 34: by Kim (new) - added it

Kim DQ'S DAY 2

6. Montag shares his concerns with his wife Millie. How are their reactions different and how does this compare to other characters throughout the book?
Montag seems like a zealot out of nowhere and Millie essentially stays in her lane from how things were going before. I feel like she is actually a bit more open-minded about him having books than I would have predicted. Other characters definitely feel more aloof.

8. Out of all the books and literature in the world, Bradbury chooses passages from the Bible and Matthew Arnold's poem Dover Beach as part of this section. Why do you think he used these works and how do they impact what happens in the story here.
I had honestly been thinking about this as reading them and my thoughts are that the Bible is one of the most well known book sin the history of literature and so it makes sense to include it. I have never heard of Arnold or that poem and so by using this it shows how the significance of the Bible is lost and now is on the same level as a random poem picked from a stack of poems.


Paula Ramos (pauraso) | 9 comments DQs Day 3 - Part 3

10.) With all of the current unrest what do you think Beatty's statement:
"for everyone nowadays knows, absolutely is certain, that nothing will ever happen to me. Others die, I go on. There are no consequences and no responsibilities."
is it still relevant and timely?

I think everyone has this sentiment at some point of their lives really, seeing something bad that happened to someone on the news, or to a friend of a friend, and thinking "that will never happen to me". But right now during the covid crisis it's specially relevant. Many people refuse to wear a mask, goes partying and are overall irresponsible, thinking they are invincible and nothing bad will ever happen to them.

11.) What did you think about Montag's flight from the city? Did the search go how you expected?
I thought Faber was a dead man honestly, and I'm suprised the Hound lost Montag's trail.

12.) The river/railroad tracks have groups of Ivy League educated "bums". Why do you think Bradbury was so specific about their backgrounds and what do you think they represent?
I think it's because the Ivy League is very well regarded and admired, so it's shocking that such people would end up in exile living as nomads.


13.) Final thoughts on book? Did it stand the test of time?
It's definitely an interesting book to read nowadays even though it was written so long ago. I enjoyed it because it made me reflect on things I hadn't even thought of before (and for that I also have to thank the people who wrote these great questions and everyone who participated in the discussion). But as a book, I think it was too fast-paced. It felt like Bradbury was more focused in giving a message than in telling a story, which isn't bad per se, but for me well-written characters are a must, and it was a bit of a let down in that area. I found all characters to be one-dimensional and a bit boring. I also felt like I didn't get to know enough about Montag's world and society, which would've been nice.


Bonus Question: The version I read had an introduction written by Neil Gaiman. In it he said:
"If someone tells you what a story is about, they are probably right.
If someone tells you that is all the story is about, they are very definitely wrong."
Do you agree? Why do you think he included this in his introduction to Fahrenheit 451?

I agree 100%. The same book can mean very different things to very different people, and I think that's the beauty in literature and in art as a whole. I think he included it in this book because it's very metaphoric and could be interpreted in many ways. He could be calling out literature experts who claim their interpretation is correct and leave no room for discussion.


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Nina | 3 comments DQ'S DAY 2

5. Part 2 is entitled The Sieve and the Sand. How does this relate to what happens in this section? What more do we find out about Montag and the situation?

It's pretty self explanatory - sand goes right through a sieve, so there's no point in trying to sieve sand. Like we see in this chapter, Montag isn't successful despite trying to understand what is the right thing to do.


6. Montag shares his concerns with his wife Millie. How are their reactions different and how does this compare to other characters throughout the book?

I was looking forward to see Millie shaken awake from her closed off world, but it didn't happen. Millie is suspicious of any kind of change, and seems to be completely happy with her life as it is. Obviously she isn't, because she overdoses on her pills, so maybe she is just too afraid to even think of the possibility of life being different from what it is. The scene with Millie and her friends shows how they are all the same.


7. Montag reaches out to Professor Faber to help him understand his newly found feelings. The Professor has his own opinion on the circumstances and how they must proceed. Discuss the Professor's role in the book including the following quote -
"The good writer's touch life often. The mediocre ones run a quick hand over her. The bad ones rape her and leave her for the flies."


I like Faber! His role is very important in this part, because without him, Montag wouldn't have been able to begin doing anything. Montag hears Faber in his ear throughout the last part of the chapter, and I think that it's a nice metaphor for the Professor being like the guiding voice inside of Montag's head.



8. Out of all the books and literature in the world, Bradbury chooses passages from the Bible and Matthew Arnold's poem Dover Beach as part of this section. Why do you think he used these works and how do they impact what happens in the story here.

I don't know about Dover Beach, but the choice of the Bible is important. I think it has to be, as it's THE book - no one would choose it without any reason at all. The irony is that no one in the story knows about the Bible and so the passages are not at all known. I guess that's done to emphasize the extent to which people have become empty minded and don't even know about the fundamental pieces of culture.


9. For a Fire Chief, Captain Beatty seems very well read and taunts Montag as they approach his house. It seems that the gig is up for Montag, what do you think is going to happen? Is there any chance at this point that Montag and Millie will survive at the end of the book?

I noticed this and was quite surprised that Beatty is so well read. In the first part, he did tell Montag that he's had to read some books in order to become fireman, but reading just a few books here and there doesn't make you that well read. I loved the cliffhanger in the end, and I have absolutely no idea what will happen, though I'm sure something terrible is about to happen. Will Montag have to kill Millie and possibly himself as well? If so, can he save himself? I have a feeling that the book will not have a happy ending, per say. The characters may not survive, but I'm waiting for the last part to have a really heave message, really hitting hard.


Alicia Ellsworth | 18 comments DQs Day 3 - Part 3

10.) With all of the current unrest what do you think Beatty's statement: "for everyone nowadays knows, absolutely is certain, that nothing will ever happen to me. Others die, I go on. There are no consequences and no responsibilities."
is it still relevant and timely?
I really don't know what to make of this but he sure was wrong. And to be killed in the way that he actually probably never thought would happen to him. Poetic justice?

11.) What did you think about Montag's flight from the city? Did the search go how you expected? I am glad that he got out, that he was even more open minded. I didn't think he would get caught, but the fact they "found him" in someone else is just another example in how much the media was controlling everyone (Bradbury sure how an insight to the future beyond even the 1990s).

12.) The river/railroad tracks have groups of Ivy League educated "bums". Why do you think Bradbury was so specific about their backgrounds and what do you think they represent? Knowledge and individuality.

13.) Final thoughts on book? Did it stand the test of time? Sure did, even though it took answering the questions to maybe understand the book better.

Bonus Question: The version I read had an introduction written by Neil Gaiman. In it he said:
"If someone tells you what a story is about, they are probably right.
If someone tells you that is all the story is about, they are very definitely wrong."
Do you agree? Why do you think he included this in his introduction to Fahrenheit 451?
I mentioned many times this was about being controlled, no one thinking for themselves. But there were little nuances and background noise all along. Clarrise for example. But that doesn't mean that is the understanding all of us got from the book. The "story" was different for all of us.


message 38: by Lisa - (Aussie Girl) (last edited Nov 04, 2020 05:58PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lisa - (Aussie Girl) | 5213 comments DQs Day 3 - Part 3

10.) With all of the current unrest what do you think Beatty's statement:
"for everyone nowadays knows, absolutely is certain, that nothing will ever happen to me. Others die, I go on. There are no consequences and no responsibilities."
is it still relevant and timely?

Definitely still rings true. Some people just go through life on auto pilot in their own bubble never thinking about the bigger picture at all. And unfortunately we all can think of examples of this type of behaviour in our current world. But I'm a glass half full type of gal, always got to have hope, think positive and move on.

11.) What did you think about Montag's flight from the city? Did the search go how you expected?

I was glad Montag survived and found his "people". Thought it was interesting how the perception was more important than the truth. Another unfortunate parallel to some aspects of our current world with the rise of social media.

12.) The river/railroad tracks have groups of Ivy League educated "bums". Why do you think Bradbury was so specific about their backgrounds and what do you think they represent?

I think Bradbury worked in Universities himself he probably saw his colleagues as the collective "wisdom" and free thinkers of society.

13.) Final thoughts on book? Did it stand the test of time?

I really enjoyed the book. It was a product of the time it was written but made me think and definitely still has relevance to today in quite a lot of its themes.

Bonus Question: The version I read had an introduction written by Neil Gaiman. In it he said:
"If someone tells you what a story is about, they are probably right.
If someone tells you that is all the story is about, they are very definitely wrong."
Do you agree? Why do you think he included this in his introduction to Fahrenheit 451.

Nicely put... there are always two sides to every story and truth is often based on an individual's perception.


message 39: by Kim (new) - added it

Kim DQs Day 3 - Part 3

10.) With all of the current unrest what do you think Beatty's statement:
"for everyone nowadays knows, absolutely is certain, that nothing will ever happen to me. Others die, I go on. There are no consequences and no responsibilities."
is it still relevant and timely?
I feel especially with COVID going on there is still that blind belief that "it won't happen to me." Humans have blind spots created by the Ego that not only inflates our abilities to accomplish endless things but also to convince us we are unstoppable.

12.) The river/railroad tracks have groups of Ivy League educated "bums". Why do you think Bradbury was so specific about their backgrounds and what do you think they represent?
I think the background helps highlight who they were before and the perspective based on the new society. In our current times, those who attend Ivy League schools tend to be accelerated in life or deemed smarter or have attained something greater in their field of study than someone who attended a state school.

Bonus Question: The version I read had an introduction written by Neil Gaiman. In it he said:
"If someone tells you what a story is about, they are probably right.
If someone tells you that is all the story is about, they are very definitely wrong."
Do you agree? Why do you think he included this in his introduction to Fahrenheit 451?

I very much agree! As an avid reader, there are so many nuances and ways to interpret things as you are reading them. A story is never just a story. Plus think about the human who is reading it! There are differences within each person and how they relate to the story or their beliefs and experiences can change their determination of it.


Sammy (sammystarbuck) | 6091 comments 5. Part 2 is entitled The Sieve and the Sand. How does this relate to what happens in this section? What more do we find out about Montag and the situation?

I agree with others that this could reflect the futility of the situation.

6. Montag shares his concerns with his wife Millie. How are their reactions different and how does this compare to other characters throughout the book?

All Millie cares about is being seen to be doing everything right, regardless of whether that equates to "right" for humanity on the whole. she has no real opinions of her own, but just regurgitates whatever the popular opinions of the day are. Basically, she's virtue-signalling. Pretending to care about whatever society tells her she should care about, and that conforming to expectations makes her happy, though it's obvious that deep down she's anything but happy.
Montag on the other hand has a brain and opinions of his own, and isn't afraid of questioning what the masses hold as absolute truths.

7. Montag reaches out to Professor Faber to help him understand his newly found feelings. The Professor has his own opinion on the circumstances and how they must proceed. Discuss the Professor's role in the book including the following quote -
"The good writer's touch life often. The mediocre ones run a quick hand over her. The bad ones rape her and leave her for the flies."


8. Out of all the books and literature in the world, Bradbury chooses passages from the Bible and Matthew Arnold's poem Dover Beach as part of this section. Why do you think he used these works and how do they impact what happens in the story here.

The Bible is very important to a great many people, and in its role as moral guide was a very obvious choice to use. I've never read the poem and know nothing about its relevance to the story.

9. For a Fire Chief, Captain Beatty seems very well read and taunts Montag as they approach his house. It seems that the gig is up for Montag, what do you think is going to happen? Is there any chance at this point that Montag and Millie will survive at the end of the book

I'd read the book before, so already knew who was going to survive...

10.) With all of the current unrest what do you think Beatty's statement:
"for everyone nowadays knows, absolutely is certain, that nothing will ever happen to me. Others die, I go on. There are no consequences and no responsibilities."
is it still relevant and timely?


Apart from a small minority of people who are convinced that every horrible thing that could happen will happen to them in particular, people in general don't really believe (or will not let themselves believe/dwell on) that bad things will happen to them. this holds true now as much as then. If it didn't, crimes would never be committed, everyone would eat healthy and exercise, and no-one would ever leave their house for fear of an accident. People know there are consequences, they simply refuse to believe, deep down, that they personally will ever have to face them.

11.) What did you think about Montag's flight from the city? Did the search go how you expected?

I'd read it before, so knew what to expect, but it was handled in the way I'd have expected from Bradbury. He describes the highlights with gusto, but doesn't bother so much with the "filler" in between...

12.) The river/railroad tracks have groups of Ivy League educated "bums". Why do you think Bradbury was so specific about their backgrounds and what do you think they represent?

Generally people see the homeless as outcasts, people who don't fit in. In this world Bradbury created, none fit that description more than scholars and people who love the written word.

13.) Final thoughts on book? Did it stand the test of time?

I think so. A lot of the ideas and themes can be easily translated into more modern equivalents, and the writing is still very accessible. I think in a way it's easier for a dystopian book to survive the passing of time than for other genres, as anything that doesn't track with the time-period it was read in can be put down to the dystopian society found there.

Bonus Question: The version I read had an introduction written by Neil Gaiman. In it he said:
"If someone tells you what a story is about, they are probably right.
If someone tells you that is all the story is about, they are very definitely wrong."
Do you agree? Why do you think he included this in his introduction to Fahrenheit 451?


No two people ever read the same book. So much depends on how the reader takes in the information presented, not to mention how that information is interpreted through the filter of their individual experiences. And virtually never will the reader read the book the author intended them to, lol.


Amanda (writers_soul) | 426 comments DQs: Part One

1. What are your thoughts on the setting of the novel? Bearing in mind it is nearly 70 years since publication, how well has it lasted the passing of time - which of the projected changes in society have or haven't come true?

- [ ] I thought the setting was interesting. Had I not know this novel was published during the post modernism period, I would have though the novel was published much more recently. There is not anything that gives away a strict time when starting the book.
- [ ] The burning/ banning of owning books in America has not come true. Jailing people for owning books has not come true. The reverse roll of firemen has not come true. The addiction to technology and callousness to our fellowman can be seen in society.

2. What are your thoughts on Guy Montag? Would you have preferred to see why he first took a book home, or do you like being in the middle of this second jolt to his life?
- [ ] I would have preferred to see him take his first book home, but this would not have fit the “stylized” writing. Allowing the reader to be in the middle keeps the story flowing faster while still getting the point across.

3. Montag has interactions with three women in this section: Clarisse (is she the original manic pixie dream girl?!), poor Mildred and the old woman who self-immolates. How do these three women help shape the trajectory of Montag's life?
- [ ] Clarisse helps show Guy what he is really missing from life. She helps to awaken him. Mildred is just stuck in the believing everything society and the government tell her. She’s afraid of everything including herself. It’s like her home has become this box of company where no one can hurt her. The woman that gives up her life with her books helps show Guy that there must really be something to these books. Maybe these people aren’t crazy. Why would someone give up their life for nothing?

4. I noticed that Bradbury uses a lot of nature metaphors and descriptors, particularly when describing the horrific, mechanical parts of the world (like the snakes in the medical machine). Why do you think he makes these language choices? Do you enjoy the writing?
- [ ] I think this is just part of the period of writing. If you wanted to take it past the postmodernism era or take that out completely. Nature is a good contrast to electronics and obsession with technology. I enjoy the writing. This is one of my favorite eras to read from.


Amanda (writers_soul) | 426 comments DQ'S DAY 2

5. Part 2 is entitled The Sieve and the Sand. How does this relate to what happens in this section? What more do we find out about Montag and the situation?
- [ ] Here we learn about Montag and his childhood experience trying to get sand to stay in a sieve. Everyone around him knew it was impossible, but he didn’t give up trying. Too stubborn or too stupid it’s hard to say. This section seems to be another one of these issues. Montag is learning these different bits and pieces about history and books, yet he cannot follow the old mans advise. He has to read to the women and make them feel pain because that is what he is used too. His stubbornness and lack of understanding are getting in the way of him learning and really making a difference.
6. Montag shares his concerns with his wife Millie. How are their reactions different and how does this compare to other characters throughout the book?
- [ ] Millie is brainwashed. She acts much like I would imagine a human robot to act, although she is suicidal. Her and her friends are insulted by this book and afraid. I think fear of repercussions is the biggest issue they face. Montag seems to be more concerned with the lack of happiness and actual conversation in American.

7. Montag reaches out to Professor Faber to help him understand his newly found feelings. The Professor has his own opinion on the circumstances and how they must proceed. Discuss the Professor's role in the book including the following quote -
"The good writer's touch life often. The mediocre ones run a quick hand over her. The bad ones rape her and leave her for the flies."
- [ ] I’m not 100% sure how I feel about Faber yet. He has done little to help calm the Chaos going on for Montag. He Professor seems to be very philosophical, which often seems above the comprehension level of Montag. The quote, at least as a writer myself, shows the important to the written word and how much it can impact society.
8. Out of all the books and literature in the world, Bradbury chooses passages from the Bible and Matthew Arnold's poem Dover Beach as part of this section. Why do you think he used these works and how do they impact what happens in the story here.
- [ ] In ever did study Bradbury in school so I cannot say 100% why he chose these. I assume the Bible because many people know it, but I myself am not religious so those parts don’t mean much to me. Maybe to show why church and state should be separated? How easily influenced many people are by religion or what they are told. I also have never ready Dover Beach so I do not feel qualified to speak on that. I feel like the Bible was used to create some type of religious undertone of defying earthly law. Again I could be totally wrong as I’m not super familiar with the Bible either.

9. For a Fire Chief, Captain Beatty seems very well read and taunts Montag as they approach his house. It seems that the gig is up for Montag, what do you think is going to happen? Is there any chance at this point that Montag and Millie will survive at the end of the book?
- [ ] Beatty is strange. He’s getting way to much pleasure out of this scenario. I feel there is a chance Millie will survive as she didn’t technically steal the books and who knows she could have reported it. Either way I don’t like her character and it is extremely one dimensional. I’m not certain if Montag will survive, if he does he will be changed. I feel some 1984 vibes coming from this part of the book.


Amanda (writers_soul) | 426 comments DQs Day 3 - Part 3

10.) With all of the current unrest what do you think Beatty's statement:
"for everyone nowadays knows, absolutely is certain, that nothing will ever happen to me. Others die, I go on. There are no consequences and no responsibilities."
is it still relevant and timely?

- [ ] I think this is relevant, especially with the Covid-19 pandemic (at least in my part of the world). People seem to think it’s not real and cannot happen to them. I think in general people always have the idea that “it can never happen to me” until it does.

11.) What did you think about Montag's flight from the city? Did the search go how you expected?
- [ ] The murder and government coverup did not surprise me. I thought it was a bit “easy” considering how “advanced” this technology is supposed to be.
12.) The river/railroad tracks have groups of Ivy League educated "bums". Why do you think Bradbury was so specific about their backgrounds and what do you think they represent?
- [ ] I think often those who go to “Ivy League” schools get on a high horse and wind up not following their career paths, especially during Bradbury’s time. Although I don’t know if this is the case for his use of their background as I haven’t done research on. I think each “bum” represents someone who society deemed replacement and irrelevant. Free thinkers and philosophers were not what this world wanted.

13.) Final thoughts on book? Did it stand the test of time?
- [ ] I gave the book a 3/5 stars. It kind of fell flat for me in a lot of ways like 1984. There is a lot of conspiracy and wild plot points which I have difficulty rationalizing. I do think some of the main ideas of technology overload, under education, war, and politics are prevalent today.
Bonus Question: The version I read had an introduction written by Neil Gaiman. In it he said:
"If someone tells you what a story is about, they are probably right.
If someone tells you that is all the story is about, they are very definitely wrong."
Do you agree? Why do you think he included this in his introduction to Fahrenheit 451?

- [ ] I do agree with Gaiman’s quote. The wonderful thing about literature is that is can be interpreted in many different ways. Each person who reads the same book will pull some slightly different ideas from it. Fahrenheit 451 is one of those books that takes some important critical thinking skills to be able to get all of the information out the author is trying to say. Even then you are bound to miss something.


message 44: by Nina (new) - rated it 3 stars

Nina | 3 comments DQs Day 3 - Part 3

10.) With all of the current unrest what do you think Beatty's statement:
"for everyone nowadays knows, absolutely is certain, that nothing will ever happen to me. Others die, I go on. There are no consequences and no responsibilities."
is it still relevant and timely?


It's very much still true, maybe now more than ever. A perfect example of this is the current pandemic. It's very easy to think that it happens to other people, but I can't possibly be infected.


11.) What did you think about Montag's flight from the city? Did the search go how you expected?

I didn't have much expectations, except that I didn't think he was going to survive. It was interesting though, getting to know about the fugitives was a nice end to the story. I only wish it would've come sooner, because now the story about the people living in the shadows was really short.


12.) The river/railroad tracks have groups of Ivy League educated "bums". Why do you think Bradbury was so specific about their backgrounds and what do you think they represent?

Evidently Bradbury thought highly of educated people. I think it might be his way of showing that we should listen to professors and other highly educated people to learn and make responsible choices for our future.


13.) Final thoughts on book? Did it stand the test of time?

I think it definitely stood the test of time. However, I didn't like it as much as I thought I would. The plot works, and some of the characters are very good. There's just something about it that left me feeling a bit indifferent in the end. Maybe the writing style wasn't to my taste. Also, I think that the characters and the dystopian world could have been studied more profoundly - now it feels a bit flat.


Bonus Question: The version I read had an introduction written by Neil Gaiman. In it he said:
"If someone tells you what a story is about, they are probably right.
If someone tells you that is all the story is about, they are very definitely wrong."
Do you agree? Why do you think he included this in his introduction to Fahrenheit 451?


I love Neil Gaiman and the quote is wonderful. I completely agree. Nothing is black and white, and there are always multiple points of view in everything. Some things might be more objectively negative or positive, but everything can be perceived through many points of view.


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