The Aspiring Polymath's Society discussion

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message 1: by Rick (new)

Rick Sam (gottfried_leibniz) | 39 comments I am wondering if this Group is alive or dead?


message 2: by Swapnil (new)

Swapnil  Das | 6 comments Rick wrote: "I am wondering if this Group is alive or dead?"

I really hope it's alive.


message 3: by Krishna (new)

Krishna | 9 comments I hope so too


message 4: by Rick (new)

Rick Sam (gottfried_leibniz) | 39 comments Well, What are you reading these days? Anything interesting?


message 5: by Swapnil (last edited Oct 01, 2020 04:35PM) (new)

Swapnil  Das | 6 comments Rick wrote: "Well, What are you reading these days? Anything interesting?"
Well outside the coursework of Undergrad Physics, I'm reading the works of Vivekananda, also planning to study Ashtavakra Gita and the Upanishads. For the western flavor, I'm trying to add reading Fyodor Dostoyevsky's and Robert Greene's works. And also some musings on Vedic Astrology :)


message 6: by Rick (new)

Rick Sam (gottfried_leibniz) | 39 comments Interesting, I've not explored Vivekananda or Hindu Philosophy works.

-Why did you choose to read them?
-What do they talk about?


message 7: by Swapnil (new)

Swapnil  Das | 6 comments Rick wrote: "Interesting, I've not explored Vivekananda or Hindu Philosophy works.

-Why did you choose to read them?
-What do they talk about?"


- I have a sort of natural spiritual/philosophical inclination, can't resist that :P

- Vivekananda's philosophical genius will be something you'll really want to explore. Upanishads are basically Vedanta (End or gist of the Vedas) and talk about Origin, existence and meaning of life.


message 8: by Rick (new)

Rick Sam (gottfried_leibniz) | 39 comments Interesting -- I am guessing he would talk about universalism and rationalism?

What do you think about existence and meaning of life?


message 9: by Swapnil (last edited Oct 01, 2020 08:20PM) (new)

Swapnil  Das | 6 comments Rick wrote: "Interesting -- I am guessing he would talk about universalism and rationalism?

What do you think about existence and meaning of life?"


- Vivekananda was primarily concerned about spreading the word of his Guru, Ramakrishna Paramahansa. He primarily talks about the Advaita Philosophy ( A-- Non, Dvaita -- Duality) and forms of Yoga like Bhakti Yoga, Karma Yoga, etc. On rationalism, I haven't read much from him. I am yet to read a lot.

- My views, I must admit with all humility, are the just the amalgamation of nineteen years and some reading therein, therefore subject to ill expression. But if pressed, I would insist that I firmly do, and will continue to oppose nihilism and absurdism. I view life as purposeful series of events, and do believe that everything has a well defined meaning and purpose.

-


message 10: by Krishna (new)

Krishna | 9 comments that's great! since you are a physics student and interested in spirituality and, philosophy, you should read the Tao of physics!


message 11: by Rick (new)

Rick Sam (gottfried_leibniz) | 39 comments @Swapnil:

I do not have much reading experience with Advaita Philosophy.

I think I can follow if you can make an attempt at it.

Could you expand more of things that you like from Bhakti Yoga, Karma Yoga?

I’m familiar with Western philosophical schools of thought.

As far as I know — most Indian or Hindoo school of thought focuses on karma, reincarnation, soul et cetera. Did I get that correct?

Interesting — I’ve thought Secular or within, Naturalism, meaning of life is to survive or pass on our genes i.e next of kin. Now that makes sense, but within Naturalism, some questions like,

-Why humility?
-Why do weaker people in society would need of help?


This is all contingent upon Naturalism being true worldview.


message 12: by Swapnil (new)

Swapnil  Das | 6 comments Krishna wrote: "that's great! since you are a physics student and interested in spirituality and, philosophy, you should read the Tao of physics!"

Thanks. I am actually working on changing my major to Physics, so I hope your words come true :P

I read about the Tao of Physics, but never gave it a try. I'll grab a copy I guess, thanks for the recommendation :)


message 13: by Rick (new)

Rick Sam (gottfried_leibniz) | 39 comments Thoughts?


message 14: by Rick (new)

Rick Sam (gottfried_leibniz) | 39 comments Knock Knock!


message 15: by Krishna (new)

Krishna | 9 comments hello Rick.... what new are you learning these days?


message 16: by Swapnil (new)

Swapnil  Das | 6 comments Rick wrote: "Thoughts?"

Hey! So sorry for an extremely late reply. Have been caught in exams and stuff of late.

I'll answer all your questions in parts, so here you go.

Could you expand more of things that you like from Bhakti Yoga, Karma Yoga?

Given my limited knowledge of Bhakti Yoga, I'll not make any half baked comments. Karma Yoga is something that I've read about, a little till now though. So it basically drives home the idea that to escape the bondage of earthly cycles, one must perform 'Nish-Kama Karma', which literally translates to 'working without desire'. This is very much misinterpreted as a theory that promotes non-work, as how can one perform karma without thinking of its consequence? But this not what it actually meant. What it actually means, roughly is "that work is ideal which is done for it's own sake, without thinking about the 'glory' or 'comfort' that it brings to us". Because we are no more attached to the 'result' here (which is rewards, glory, or any other material satisfaction), we are no longer in bondage, and therefore subject to mukti (liberation).

- "Interesting — I’ve thought Secular or within, Naturalism, meaning of life is to survive or pass on our genes i.e next of kin."

I politely disagree. 'Life' and 'Surviving' are two different things. While the above is a good way of survival, the true aim of life is to gain knowledge. I sincerely reject any other school of thought, including the ones which promote happiness as the ultimate of life. The reason being except for the former, all other paths ultimately lead to misery. All vices, including anger, jealousy, depression, etc. have roots from this viewpoint of life.

For example, why do people get angry? It is because we expect something to happen in a self established 'ideal' way, and that doesn't happen. Indirectly, this demands an expected state of mental equilibrium in the future, which is one form of happiness. If we on the other hand have no expectation from anyone, and instead work for its own sake, then anger, misery, etc. won't pop up.

I'll answer the other questions, probably later today.


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