Connors book club discussion

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any good books you guys reading

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message 1: by Connor (last edited Sep 23, 2020 07:57PM) (new)

Connor Quinn | 19 comments Mod
I just finished "mans search for meaning". pretty good book, but I think some of it flew over my head I'm gonna have to revisit it when I'm smarter. If anyone wants to borrow it, just let me know.


message 2: by Palyn (new)

Palyn | 1 comments Yeah, I got some books like dune

1.Dragon Lance series
2. Wheel of time series

It’s like dune so it’s gonna be long


message 3: by Jacob (new)

Jacob TIndle | 8 comments Mod
Finished the Fisherman and it was pretty depressing. So if you like horror novels and feeling sad that one is for you.
Currently reading Dune and don't understand anything. Like my little peabrain can't comprehend anything that's happening. Bald lady wizards are creepy and I'd argue even more creepy than the gigantic death worms. But if you like sci-fi and being confused then you know its probably for you.
Thanks for coming to my Ted Talk


message 4: by Connor (new)

Connor Quinn | 19 comments Mod
I finally finished another book so i have an excuse to post.
I just read Inhibition by Teru Miyamoto. Inhibition is a novel about a young man named Tetsuyuki. He riddled with debt from his dead father and to avoid the collectors he moves into a shabby apartment. While there he happens to nail a lizard to a wall.
The book is written as a novel but has some really intriguing philosophies and thoughts on life.
Not a perfect book but I enjoyed reading it. If anyone wants to borrow it, just let me know.


message 5: by Isabella (new)

Isabella Feistauer | 14 comments Mod
I just finished We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson, which was very very good. Currently trying to give Wuthering Heights a 2nd try after hating it and not finishing the first time. Surprise, surprise: still hate it.


message 6: by Jacob (new)

Jacob TIndle | 8 comments Mod
reading book is hard now


message 7: by Connor (new)

Connor Quinn | 19 comments Mod
I finished Earthlings by Sayaka Murata, and that was a weird-ass book. You gotta read it I can't say anything about it other than that.


message 8: by Isabella (new)

Isabella Feistauer | 14 comments Mod
I don’t hate Wuthering heights that much after binge reading it over the weekend. Still far from finished with the book, but I have to give it a pause to read a couple other books for school. Overall, if you plan on reading books from the early 1800s, I DO NOT recommend starting with Wuthering Heights. Try little women or anything from Jane Austen to get a sense of the language and culture first.


message 9: by Jacob (new)

Jacob TIndle | 8 comments Mod
I miss pre Tuesday


message 10: by Connor (new)

Connor Quinn | 19 comments Mod
Jacob wrote: "I miss pre Tuesday"

Get a kindle loser


message 11: by Jacob (new)

Jacob TIndle | 8 comments Mod
dude my name is tindle not kindle


message 12: by Aidan (new)

Aidan Reynolds | 2 comments I started reading “Psychedelia: An Ancient Culture, a Modern Way of Life” and though its purpose is to enlighten people about psychedelic drugs I still found it incredibly interesting in its exploration of the phenomenon of achieving a higher consciousness. Maybe not a topic for everyone as these substances aren’t legal, but I still think it’s worth understanding the ideas expressed through the authors experience along with the slight bit of history. :)


message 13: by Isabella (new)

Isabella Feistauer | 14 comments Mod
Currently reading two books: Nickel and Dimed by Barbara Ehrenreich and Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut. Nickel and Dimed is good, but it is difficult to enjoy reading because I have to analyze it for AP Lang, and I would rather annotate freely and look for my own trends and patterns as is relevant to the outside world-not as is relevant to grammar and rhetoric like my teacher wants me to :/ Can't tell you much about Slaughterhouse because I've barely cracked the cover, but I have a very good feeling about it.


message 14: by Connor (new)

Connor Quinn | 19 comments Mod
I finished kafka on the Shore by haruki murakami (really good author by the by) this book was amazing, it was hard to get into at first because it's about some angsty 15 year old but damn, once it got going it was going. one of the best books I've ever read.


message 15: by Isabella (new)

Isabella Feistauer | 14 comments Mod
Reading wuthering heights again....sigh


message 16: by Isabella (new)

Isabella Feistauer | 14 comments Mod
Btw! Slaughterhouse is very good and I would recommend; but beware! Kurt Vonnegut shows his true misogynistic viewpoints through his patterns while writing female characters. Excellent anti-war book, but read with this bias in mind.


message 17: by Connor (new)

Connor Quinn | 19 comments Mod
I read the giver by Lois Lowry and it was a really good book. I've read my fair share of "dystopian to us but not the main character" kinda of books and this one nailed it. would read again


message 18: by Isabella (new)

Isabella Feistauer | 14 comments Mod
Six of Crows!!!! Is SO good!!!! About to finish it and read the second one.


message 19: by Connor (new)

Connor Quinn | 19 comments Mod
okay go off


message 20: by Jacob (new)

Jacob TIndle | 8 comments Mod
if heard of increasing rates of people actually living in Delaware. Personally I still doubt its existence but if it makes people feel better to lie then who am I to stop them.


message 21: by Jacob (new)

Jacob TIndle | 8 comments Mod
Its come to my attention that a delawarian (connar *nerd emoji* [emojis arnt supported so i had to type it out] ) said my grammar was off but I disagree. It's actually perfect and they don't know what they are talking about.


message 22: by Connor (new)

Connor Quinn | 19 comments Mod
I finished piranesi by Susana Clark. it's a really good book. at first I was like this sounds like a cool premise but I'm kinda bored, but then I was like oh shit this is amazing. then I was like damn I'm finished. then I was like oh yeah I gotta write something in the group. then I was like "I finished piranesi by Susana Clark. it's a really good book. at first I was like this sounds like a cool premise but I'm kinda bored, but then I was like oh shit this is amazing. then I was like damn I'm finished. then I was like oh yeah I gotta write something in the group. then I was like" anyway good book would read again


message 23: by Isabella (new)

Isabella Feistauer | 14 comments Mod
My final review of Six of Crows:
Pretty much the perfect fantasy book. It wasn’t too fairy-tale like, because it was from the perspective of a bunch of criminals and outcasts, which I really liked. The idea of crime and sin in a supposedly fantastical world (I say supposedly because it walks the line of science fiction) really enticed me. If you are looking for an easy and enjoyable read that will hook you from beginning to end, I absolutely recommend Six of Crows. The author, Leigh Bardugo, has a trilogy series called Shadow and Bone which is written in the same universe. I’m not sure if not reading it beforehand altered my reading experience of Six of Crows, but I felt like it was not difficult to find my footing the the universe she had created. I am now reading the 2nd book of the Six of Crows duology, Crooked Kingdom. It is good so far, especially since the author dives really deep into characterization, and the storyline is going in a completely different direction that I thought it would. Will update you guys later.


message 24: by Connor (new)

Connor Quinn | 19 comments Mod
I read the stranger by Albert Camus. it's about a guy who doesn't care to much that his mother died and doest cry at it, boy does he regret that. just kidding he doesn't actually regret it because this guy lives in the present, like really in the present. And I dig it. good book


message 25: by Isabella (new)

Isabella Feistauer | 14 comments Mod
I read the stranger a few years ago and its probs my favorite philosophy book ever. How does society react to pure, unbiased nihilism? Death. Also Albert Camus was really hot in his youth just saying.


message 26: by Connor (new)

Connor Quinn | 19 comments Mod
there's like two good photos of Albert Camus where he looks good. now jean paul sarte was a looker.


message 27: by Connor (last edited Jan 20, 2021 03:59PM) (new)

Connor Quinn | 19 comments Mod
I have finished The midnight library by Matt Haig, and Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka.

The Midnight library was an amazing novel that talks about regrets and what would happen if we could go back and change them. It shows us that even if we could go back we'd probably still be sad. A really good book that wasn't hard to read or understand, but was still thought provoking.

The metamorphosis was a really short book that you could read in a few hours if you really wanted to. I didn't because while I liked the book and what it talked about, I didn't like the way it was written. It was walls of text and didn't give the reader much room. I'm not sure if that makes much sense but whos actually gonna read this far? Isabella maybe? well if you made it this far ill give you a free bookmark.
Anyway back to the book. Other then the walls of text (which could also be attributed to my version of the book I have no idea) It was a really good book that talked about how fricken mean Gregor's family is. The dude goes and provides for the whole family then the second he gets turned into a bug he's kicked to the curb? I get it, a giant bug would scare the hell out of me too, but if it were my own son I would at least call a doctor or something, but I digress.

All in all both very good books if I had to pick a favorite id probably pick Midnight Library, but if you don't want to read a medium sized novel then read Metamorphosis. Or read whatever you want I'm not your dad I'm just the book guy.


message 28: by Isabella (new)

Isabella Feistauer | 14 comments Mod
I want my free bookmark Connor


message 29: by Lily (new)

Lily G (lgalloway22) | 1 comments I read a book like a week ago, but I forgot to post about it. It's Ella Minnow Pea by Mark Dunn. It was a really cool concept! It's about this little nation off the coast of N. Carolina, and the whole book is written in letters to and from the citizens. Well, they had the phrase "The Quick Fox Jumped Over The Lazy Brown Dog" posted on their capital building, and the letter start to fall off. Whenever a letter falls off, it's no longer allowed to be used in speech or writing, so you can see throughout the book, the letters slowly go away. It was a really cool book. I read half of it while half-asleep, so it got really hard to read for a while, but it was still interesting.


message 30: by Isabella (new)

Isabella Feistauer | 14 comments Mod
Just as an update, I finished mans search for meaning and I am now reading Song of Achilles. “When did you start reading man’s search for meaning Bella?” Literally the day I finished Crooked Kingdom. It was a really hard switch for me bc I was bawling my eyes out at the end of a fantasy novel and now suddenly had to switch to a philosophical autobiography. Man’s Search for Meaning was very good though, so I can’t wait to discuss it in Philosophy Club (which is why I am reading it).


message 31: by Isabella (new)

Isabella Feistauer | 14 comments Mod
Song of Achilles ruined me. I don’t think I will ever be able to write a comprehensive review of this book because it will bring tears to my eyes every time. Beautiful writing and a must-read.


message 32: by Jacob (new)

Jacob TIndle | 8 comments Mod
A movie is just a picture book moving. That being said, didn't read a book but watched grease and whats eating Gilbert grape back to back. Grease top 10 favorite movies and Gilbert really sad and can really get you thinking.


message 33: by Connor (new)

Connor Quinn | 19 comments Mod
movies only count if you had subtitles on


message 34: by Isabella (new)

Isabella Feistauer | 14 comments Mod
I finished Shadow and Bone, Leigh Bardugo's first installment of her "Grishaverse" in 3 days. I won't say it's better than her Six of Crows duology, but hey, comfort fantasy is comfort fantasy, am I right? I would recommend Bardugo's books to anyone who likes big fantasy worlds and characterization.


message 35: by Connor (new)

Connor Quinn | 19 comments Mod
I read "what I talk about when I talk about running" by haruki murakami and he is my favorite author for sure now. he made the best book ever (kafka on the shore) and in this he just talks about his life. youd think it would be lame but it was really neat to read about. after reading I feel wiser more peaceful. something about murakami's personality is really endearing. he isnt trying to impress anyone and does what he wants. he seems really true to himself and I really admire that.

good book, good guy you should read something of his.


message 36: by Connor (new)

Connor Quinn | 19 comments Mod
I finished All Men are Mortal by Simone de Beauvoir.
It was pretty good I don't regret reading it and it made me stop and think, which is the best thing a book can do. It is pretty slow and boring at times. like the part where he helps in Spain? ZZzZZzzzZZ that part was so hard to get through but everything else kind of flew by. I'm just going to choose that the slow part was to help show that when you're immortal it gets pretty boring.

I'd give it a 3.5 out 5.


message 37: by Connor (new)

Connor Quinn | 19 comments Mod
Get a load of this virgin


message 38: by Isabella (new)

Isabella Feistauer | 14 comments Mod
Quick question for connor!!! Why isn’t this a private group????


message 39: by Connor (new)

Connor Quinn | 19 comments Mod
all are welcome to discuss their books, even really bad authors spamming there bad books on every group.


message 40: by Ariel (new)

Ariel Braley | 4 comments idk if you're going to read this, BUT I just finished reading A Clockwork Orange and it was one of those books that you're just like WHAT THE HECK DID I JUST READ. I mean this in the best way possible. It's hard to get into at first because it has made up slang, but there's a glossary in the back to help. You'll catch on quick though. I definitely suggest this unless you have a weak stomach or pain tolerance. It's quite repulsive. ANYWAY, really great book and I 100% definitely recommend.


message 41: by Ariel (new)

Ariel Braley | 4 comments Oh and also while you're here, I am quite literally begging you to read The Decapitated Chicken by Horacio Quiroga. TELL ME WHAT YOU THINK. It's really short though. It'll take you less than 20 minutes.

https://www.shortstoryproject.com/sto...

Here. No excuses. Copy and paste. I need a fellow human to give me their opinion on this.
Also this might take longer due to the rereading factor (I'm pretty sure you'll have to read it more than once) and is WAY more confusing: Death and the Compass.

http://art3idea.psu.edu/metalepsis/te...

You should definitely read it if you have time. However, time is not something that everyone has in abundance. :( If you do read it though PLEASE tell me what you think.


message 42: by Ariel (new)

Ariel Braley | 4 comments ok im done rambling


message 43: by Connor (new)

Connor Quinn | 19 comments Mod
I read decapitated chicken and I really liked it. I liked how real it all felt, there was no bubbles or anything it was just two selfish people blaming each other for something out of there control. also I didnt know that short story website existed it looks pretty cool


message 44: by Ariel (new)

Ariel Braley | 4 comments Connor wrote: "I read decapitated chicken and I really liked it. I liked how real it all felt, there was no bubbles or anything it was just two selfish people blaming each other for something out of there control..."

Glad you liked it! I agree, the dialogue and relationship between the parents is interesting. Yeah it's kind of dark for some people's taste, but I think it brings up some interesting points.

The way that Cortazar (sorry I don't know how to add accents) describes the four sons is so incredibly brutal that it seems almost a little satirical. The way that people with disabilities are looked upon in the actual world almost seems to match the description that the author gave them. I feel as if Cortazar was commenting on that very thing; how we as a society treat and think about the people that need our understanding the most.

Also, I wonder if the author was criticizing how couples feel as though their love is pointless if they don't have children. The story states that only a child could bring fruitfulness out of their relationship, otherwise it was pointless. So really their love was weak to begin with, you know?

Another little thing I picked up on was how the sons mimicked what they saw. Maybe this is a little critique on how as humans we are quick to repeat what we see, even if it is as grotesque as what happened in the story. That might be a bit of a stretch, but it kind of fits.

Maybe it was just me, but I didn't pity the sons after what they had done to their sister. Maybe I'm just a terrible person, but I really resented them for their beastly behavior. Then I got to thinking, maybe I should really be angry at the parents. If it weren't for their lack of love and care, they most likely wouldn't have ever done something so horrendous. After Bertita was born, they were never again shown affection or love, so how could they be expected to display any sort of healthy behavior? I feel like this might have been the main theme that Cortazar was trying to present, I don't know, but that's what I personally took from it. What makes a person? Should we hate a person for what the world has made them into, or should we have compassion? Where do we draw the line and hold people 100% responsible for their evil actions, even if it is a result of what they've been molded into by exterior factors? I personally am not sure, so I would love to hear what you think!


message 45: by Isabella (new)

Isabella Feistauer | 14 comments Mod
Hello all. It has been a while, but I am here to announce that I have finally (after nine months) finished Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte. I genuinely don't know how to describe the way I feel about this book. I rated it 3 stars on Good Reads, but a number will never be able to really capture my thoughts. First of all: yes, I think everyone should read this book at least once in their life. Overall, it is a great book, and many comment on the beautiful writing, gothic romance, etc, but its true beauty lies in its ability to make each reader come up with a different opinion about it. Some loathe Wuthering Heights, some adore Wuthering Heights, but all should read Wuthering Heights. The story of Heathcliff is so immense, stretching across what felt like three lifetimes but truly was only his, and so well- narrated (Nelly <3), that I cannot truthfully say it is a bad book. It is most definitely a difficult read. The language is old, and a lot of the time I wanted to throw the book across the room because I hated the events that were taking place, but the beauty of this book really is that it makes you hate pretty much all the characters while also loving them. It's a soap opera in a 19th-century book, and I admire it. I will never look at or read this book again tho.


message 46: by Matt (new)

Matt | 2 comments Well mama jamas I’m back in business. I’ve been reading a TON of books for my psychology lecture and they’re really really fascinating so I’m gonna start posting them on here. Ok first on the docket is a book called “How to be a stoic”.
This one wasn’t for my lecture but it was really fast and pretty insightful, at least for someone whose still pretty new at philosophy. It’s not a cohesive text but rather a collection of works by a bunch of stoic philosophers from around history, translated by Robert Dobbin. Okay babies the next one is a book called “thinking fast and slow” by Daniel Kahneman. Now hold on to your butts cause this book just makes so much sense. It’s basically an in depth look at the way our minds behave in almost all situations, by using 2 systems which interact with a stimulus, and each other. It’s crazy how much of our lives is dictated by the system of thinking described in the book. Ok well class started so I’m done for now.


message 47: by Matt (new)

Matt | 2 comments Alright Im back again. I recently finished reading a book called “the righteous mind: why good people are divided by politics and religion” and it was really interesting. It’s basically just a detailed analysis of relativity recent ideas In the field of moral philosophy. That’s pretty much it 8/10 I’d recommend it. (Tho the last few chapters kinda drag on ngl)


message 48: by Connor (new)

Connor Quinn | 19 comments Mod
I just finished the "love hypothesis" gifted to my by my wonderful girlfriend chloe, and at first I thought I wasnt going to like it to much. I've never really read a romcom kinda book, but I was wrong this book slaps. The only problem I have with it is how I cant relate much with the main character. The whole time I was face palming at all the issues she got herself into and I was screaming at the main character to just THINK. I know the author does this on purpose, because the whole time shes just showing the reader the answer and having us watch MC just deal with everything. in the end I was so happy everything was resolved. this book had me acting up. 4/5


message 49: by Aidan (new)

Aidan Reynolds | 2 comments mmm book


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