Hardboiled American Crime and Other Noir Fiction discussion

53 views
About This Group > Introduce Yourself

Comments Showing 1-50 of 86 (86 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1

message 1: by Dan, Hardboiled Historical American (last edited Sep 12, 2020 12:10AM) (new)

Dan | 19 comments Welcome to The Hardboiled School of American Detective and Crime Fiction.

This group was my brain child. I saw some great Thriller, Mystery, Suspense, and Crime fiction groups here, but their emphasis all seems to be on the latest bestseller's list. Every time a classic of the genre would be nominated for group read, it would finish near the bottom in their polls. What a shame!

Surely there are other people like me who enjoy history, reading classics, and want to give these books a go along side other fellow crime fiction afficionados? I therefore have created a space just for us. I doubt we will ever have the large numbers of the more current, mainstream, suspense thriller readers. But I think that's fine. We have our niche right here.

Besides liking history and classic fiction, especially genre fiction of almost any sort, I have also long loved the moody atmosphere of the film noir movement of the 1940s and early '50s. I am in my 50s and work less hard these days, so I have lots of time to read. Those interests all combine to make this group a natural for me.

So please, introduce yourself and tell us something about you. You can start with your favorite crime writers and books, your favorite films, or whatever else you want to share about why you're here and what you hope to get from the group. Welcome!


message 2: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 15 comments My name is Rosemarie and I love reading and travelling. I'm a retired teacher so I have lots of time to read.
I am a member of many groups in goodreads dedicated to classics, British mysteries, international fiction and science fiction.
I am not that familiar with this genre but I am a big fan of Dashiell Hammett-so I said "Why not?" and have joined the group.


message 3: by Dan, Hardboiled Historical American (last edited Sep 12, 2020 12:09AM) (new)

Dan | 19 comments Hi Rosemarie. If you have read and appreciate Dashiell Hammett, I bet you know more about this genre than you realized. Hopefully, you make some new author friends from among his acquaintances. I wanted to keep this on the down-low, but I actually also like those British cozy mysteries too. Welcome to the group. Glad you joined.


message 4: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 15 comments Thanks, Dan.


message 5: by Wayne (new)

Wayne Turmel (wayneturmel) | 4 comments Hi Dan and Rosemarie. My name is Wayne Turmel, and I live in Las Vegas. Hamett and Chandler corrupted me, I supposed. I'm a big fan of noir and an author myself. My fourth novel, out in November, features a detective, and I'd love it if you checked it out, as long as you know the detective also happens to be a werewolf. Genre blending can be fun! Look forward to finding lots of great reads here


message 6: by Two Envelopes and a Phone (last edited Sep 13, 2020 09:31PM) (new)

Two Envelopes and a Phone Hi, my name is Seth - around here, Two Envelopes and a Phone - and I’m 52 years old, living in Canada.

Some of my fave hardboiled films:

White Heat
The Long Goodbye (1973, Robert Altman)
The Hitch-Hiker (1953...hmm, is that one more ‘noir’ than ‘hardboiled’?)
The Big Sleep
Detour

Some favourite novels in the genre:

His Name Was Death, by Fredric Brown (anything by Fredric Brown, though as far as his place in the hardboiled field goes...he definitely belongs, but he’s not exactly the typical example...)
Green Ice, by Raoul Whitfield
The Walter Syndrome, by Richard Neely
The Blue Hammer, by Ross MacDonald
Peeper, by Loren D. Estleman
Room to Swing, by Ed Lacy
Quarry, by Max Allan Collins
The Long Goodbye, by Raymond Chandler
High Sierra, by W. R. Burnett
No Good from a Corpse, by Leigh Brackett
Red Harvest, by Dashiell Hammett


I don’t do a lot of re-reading but I’m going to try and get into the habit, as this group does its monthly reads. It’s been many years since I read The Maltese Falcon, anyway, so it should be fun to revisit it. That goes for The Postman Always Rings Twice, too. And of course I haven’t read every hardboiled novel; for instance, I’ve never read The Big Sleep, just seen the 1946 film.


message 7: by Dan, Hardboiled Historical American (last edited Sep 14, 2020 07:14PM) (new)

Dan | 19 comments Welcome Wayne, Scott, and Seth!

Wayne, it's great to have an author on board. Seeing your post reminds me I need to create a self promotion section. Funny you should mention werewolves. Scott and I moderate a werewolf group here on GoodReads. I find that one hard to keep up with. Werewolves are my favorite monster (vs. mummies, vampires, and zombies, etc.), but one can only read so much lycanthropic material.

Scott, I'm pleasantly surprised to find you joining. I didn't know you read much of the non-speculative genres.

Seth, I thought I knew my noir to some extent, but they made so very many films of it. I've only seen The Hitchhiker, of the films you mention, two or three different versions. Maybe I have seen one or two of the others. I often forget I've seen a film until I'm ten minutes or so into it. That is a wonderful reading list! I'm somewhat new to this genre, but even I recognize a lot of those titles. I'll bet we get to some of them in the coming months. It's great to have an expert on this genre here with us. I hope we see your input a lot.


message 8: by Pamellia (new)

Pamellia (michiganparents) | 2 comments Hi everyone. Thanks for the invitation, Dan. The genre is not one I know much about, but I have read a few of the more popular British authors. I honestly love books about assassins. Read a rather comical one a few years ago and am currently finishing up the Noah Wolf series. As far a As detective novels go will probably read the Dan Pritchard series, a contemporary author. I will need to get a new laptop prior to being active here


message 9: by Dan, Hardboiled Historical American (new)

Dan | 19 comments Welcome Pamellia. I have heard of Nero Wolfe, but never Noah Wolf. I had to look him up to make sure there was such a detective! Good to have you with us.


message 10: by Alan (new)

Alan | 5 comments Hi I’m Alan,from Toronto. I love noir and crime fiction and want to read so much more of it. Whenever a noir comes on tv I always tape it. I saw a phenomenal one with Dick Bogarde two weeks ago-title eludes me. I am crazy about black and white films and I tend to see this literary genre in black and white. There is a good video online of someone talking about the relationship between noir and California.the talk brings up a lot of ideas I had never thought of before.


message 11: by Wayne (new)

Wayne Turmel (wayneturmel) | 4 comments HI Alan. Yeah the thing that a lot of people don't pay attention to about noir is a) it took place right after the war, when people were (at least on the surface) feeling pretty optimistic, except this dark sense that something wasn't right. And b) Chandler and Hammett (and Kane too) set their stories in California as a dark counterpoint to all that sun and supposed optimism.


message 12: by Dan, Hardboiled Historical American (new)

Dan | 19 comments Welcome Alan. I'm a big fan of noir films too. I think that fandom is a good gateway into hardboiled fiction. If not for noir films our genre might become forgotten altogether instead of simply neglected.

You raise an interesting point about California being a favorite setting for this genre. Where are our first three reads set? #1 San Francisco. #2 Los Angeles. #3 Between Los Angeles and San Diego. Given, as Albert Hammond sang, how "it never rains in southern California," that does seem to be an odd choice of setting.


message 13: by Wayne (new)

Wayne Turmel (wayneturmel) | 4 comments Dan wrote: "Welcome Alan. I'm a big fan of noir films too. I think that fandom is a good gateway into hardboiled fiction. If not for noir films our genre might become forgotten altogether instead of simply neg..."

Films are definitely the gateway drug for most of us in any genre.


message 14: by Alan (new)

Alan | 5 comments One can find an enormous collection of noir films on you tube for free viewing. I think most of them come from the tv station Turner Classics Movies. Just search for noir movies.
I can’t tell all of you how many times I’ve record a noir movie,start watching and half-way through I realize I’ve seen it already. I recently saw a fantastic one with Edward G Robinson called The Woman In the Window. Just great

A really great site for historical info on crime is The Crime Reader. It is part of the Lit Hub reader. It’s free and online and it comes out a few times a week. Currently there is a discussion on forgotten crime writers,including a few women writers who I don’t know if anyone has heard of. The site is not exclusively noir,but they go there from time to time.


message 15: by Marie (last edited Nov 04, 2020 08:13AM) (new)

Marie Hello All,

I am happy to have found this group. I am a college instructor and mama to a little girl who is obsessed with classic literature on audiobooks, particularly Pooh, Beatrix Potter, Alice, and Mary Poppins.

I remember receiving the first three Nancy Drew books when I was 6 and it set me on the path of mystery. I also was a fan of Hitchcock and eventually fell in love with my ultimate favorite: Agatha Christie.

Growing up I loved classic films. Casablanca and Sabrina introduced me to Humphrey Bogart, and that eventually led to the Big Sleep. When I first saw film noir, I was hooked. I used to joke with my parents that I wished that I lived in black and white because I love the classic nature and moodiness of black and white photography and cinema.

I fell into the hard-boiled detectives from my love of noir movies. I have read the Big Sleep and the Thin Man years ago and recently read my first Ellery Queen. I am interested to see where this group goes and to be able to hang out with my favorite reading buddy, our retired greyhound named Bogart.


message 16: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 15 comments Hi, Marie. Welcome to the group!


message 17: by Dan, Hardboiled Historical American (last edited Nov 04, 2020 11:03AM) (new)

Dan | 19 comments Nice to have you with us, Marie. Our second month of existence here features another read of a book a Bogart film made even more famous. Well, we should give Bacall get credit too.

I started with Nancy Drew in the third grade and then discovered the Hardy Boys a year or two later. While I enjoyed both series somewhat (slight preference to Nancy), they sometimes seemed too cute to me. Then one summer I visited an aunt who had the 1920s and '30s original versions (coverless) in her basement getting somewhat moldy. These were so much better! The stories had the edge to them I was looking for that the 1950s rewritten versions wrote out. Now I recognize I liked the originals more because they were harder boiled! I spent that summer reading one after the other, finishing one about every other day.

I've seen The Big Sleep film before, but made little sense of its plot. Like so many others, I watched it for the character interactions. I wonder if after we read the book we will make better sense of the film plot.

In any event, welcome again to the group, Marie. I think you'll fit right in.


message 18: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 15 comments Hi, Charles. Welcome.


message 19: by Dan, Hardboiled Historical American (new)

Dan | 19 comments A lot of the reading we're doing here comes from the 1930s, some of which became the basis for 1940s and '50s noir films. Nice to have you aboard Charles.


message 20: by Raistlin (new)

Raistlin Skelley | 4 comments Hello everyone,

My name is Raistlin Skelley, I'm a neo-noir crime writer from Southwestern Pennsylvania. Most of my favorite writers are dead and every book I read makes me think I'm less and less well read. But the hardboiled school of writers were the first I could identify and relate to and made me think that my writing had a place in the world. Even if it is nearly a century after the fact. I have self-published a few books but that's a separate matter. I'm also brand new to Goodreads and kind of feel like I'm on a spaceship.

Thank you for having me.


message 21: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 15 comments Hi, Raistlin! Welcome to the group!


message 22: by Jack (new)

Jack King | 1 comments Jack from Texas. I like the classic NOIR movies and detective / P.I. novels by the masters of the late 1930's, 1940's, and 1950's. Lots of good new authors out now, too, with entertaining detective / crime thriller novels.


message 23: by Celeste (new)

Celeste (pinkbear) | 1 comments Hi Everyone, I’m Celeste and I love a good mystery! I’ve started to expand my reading into genres that I’ve always had an interest in but haven’t read yet. Joining your group is exciting and I look forward to reading along with everyone in October.


message 24: by Dan, Hardboiled Historical American (last edited Aug 28, 2021 02:19AM) (new)

Dan | 19 comments Welcome Jack and Celeste. I hope you find a happy home here. Almost half the novels on our bookshelf (these are the books we have read as a group so far) could qualify as mysteries. More than half contain a P.I. or someone acting in a law enforcement manner. All but two strike me as noirish.

We're a fairly quiet, laid back group here. But we read a lot of hidden gems, most of which will be considered classics one day if they're not already. Much, though not all, of what we read comes from the pulps. When we do, we try to read the stories that stand out in some way. That's not hard to do. Often, the literature that appeared in the pulps has been seriously undervalued by later generations.

Please check out our bookshelf of past reads, if you're looking for good reading material. You can always add a comment to any of the books we've read as you're reading it or once you're done. Topics about literature at this group never close. My personal favorite that's on our bookshelf so far is Pop. 1280. It's the least hardboiled, but definitely the funniest. It is an excellent mystery that features a sheriff.


message 25: by Douglas, Cosmopolitan and Multi-Genre Noir (new)

Douglas Morrison | 211 comments Hi Dan and the rest of ya,

I am a Mod in one of Dans other projects on GR and he never mentioned he ran this site!

Anyway, I am an author of Noir and Lovecraftian Horror, but more of a reader than an author I suspect.

Anyways, in the interest of self promotion I have added my book to the Self Promotion Folder, since I didn't have a trumpet I could blow outside your window this morning.


message 26: by Dan, Hardboiled Historical American (last edited Sep 06, 2021 04:43AM) (new)

Dan | 19 comments Welcome to the hardboiled group Douglas. It's great to see you here. We're quieter than many groups, but passionate about the literature. Cheers!


message 27: by Douglas, Cosmopolitan and Multi-Genre Noir (new)

Douglas Morrison | 211 comments Dan wrote: "Welcome to the hardboiled group Douglas. It's great to see you here. We're quieter than many groups, but passionate about the literature. Cheers!"

I hope so, I really enjoy my Noir fix.

Will send out invites again to everyone on my list, sure their is a few fans of this style of literature their.

May just suggest my new book as a read also, since it fits the bill.


message 28: by Dan, Hardboiled Historical American (last edited Sep 06, 2021 05:23AM) (new)

Dan | 19 comments We could do it as a buddy read for October if there's enough interest. Or you could nominate it for the monthly poll. We do read some shorter works in this group. A few months, for example, we read collections of just three or four short stories for authors of particular interest, Race Williams and Dan Turner stories coming most readily to mind.


message 29: by Douglas, Cosmopolitan and Multi-Genre Noir (new)

Douglas Morrison | 211 comments I have just extend an invitation to all 480+ on my friend list, Ian and a few others I know are fans so lets hope they sign up?

Meantime, yes, whatever is the best way to get the book out their for peoples attention. Its a great style to write in so would like to share that with others.


message 30: by Julez (new)

Julez Hi

I’m Julez. I live in NY not much more to say other than I love reading.


message 31: by Francesc (new)

Francesc Hi, everybody. First, I'm from Spain and I'm not an expert of Hardboiled novels. It's just my favourite genre because of Chandler novel "Lady in the lake". I'm a classic reader because my English is, well, not too good to read fluently. I'm usually read in Catalan or Spanish and translations of this genre are often poor.
I have joined this group because I adore Hardboiled as a literature, not like a minor genre with bad quality.
Well, that's me. It's my first experience in a group, so, easy, please.


message 32: by Douglas, Cosmopolitan and Multi-Genre Noir (last edited Sep 06, 2021 08:21AM) (new)

Douglas Morrison | 211 comments Hi Julez!

You made it!

So you enjoy Noir books? Planning on joining in the group read or buddy read?

Have you read Paul Cain before?


message 33: by Douglas, Cosmopolitan and Multi-Genre Noir (new)

Douglas Morrison | 211 comments Francesc wrote: "Hi, everybody. First, I'm from Spain and I'm not an expert of Hardboiled novels. It's just my favourite genre because of Chandler novel "Lady in the lake". I'm a classic reader because my English i..."

Hi F :)

Welcome aboard, I would imagine a lot of the heavier works, like Paul Cain for example is pretty much gobbledook then. He writes in the style of the time, in almost what can be described as fast / broken english.

But that kind of book is really worth the effort I find :)


message 34: by Dan, Hardboiled Historical American (new)

Dan | 19 comments Hi Francesc. I lived in Andalucia six years of my life, picked up Spanish, and was thinking about how hard it might be to translate hardboiled books into Spanish or Catalan. The vocabulary wouldn't be that difficult. Commonplace English words are what is mostly used. But capturing stylistic subtleties. I mean, the translator would have to use equivalent words of the lower classes, gitanos, and criminals rather than the more common Spanish words. It could be done, but it would require a true expert in both languages to really get it right. Anyhow, glad you're with us.

Julez, we do a lot of reading here, but it's not the usual stuff. Well, not the usual stuff of this era at least. Glad to have you on board!


message 35: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Harris (theharrisauthor) | 23 comments Hello Everyone,
Carmen here - happy to join this group! Thank you for the invite. I don't think I've read very many old-school detective/crime/thriller novels - though I'm definitely a fan of the contemporary listings.
Got two Nancy Drew books on the bookshelf - but haven't touched them in years. One thing I will say is that I am very fascinated by the 1920's and 1950's era - and have been in the mood to read books that are set in those eras. : )
I'm definitely happy to jump in and read some books from the early to mid 20th century.
Question - would Arthur Conan Doyle also be included in this list? Or is he a bit too much of a famous example? I've read a collection of his stories.


message 36: by Douglas, Cosmopolitan and Multi-Genre Noir (new)

Douglas Morrison | 211 comments Hi C :)

For me, he is very mainstream? Dan will need to decide as he understands the technical position of a book more than I do?

I am presuming there are two diff Nancy Drew books? When I was a kid she was a child's series of stories about a child investigator much in the theme of the Three Investigators by Alfred Hitchcock (ghostwritten though).

Beyond that, I am adding a few example names into the pile tonight under authors, and we do have the Buddy Reads and Group Reads.

Paul Cain is one of my fave authors and he is a prime example of an author of this genre.


message 37: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Harris (theharrisauthor) | 23 comments Douglas wrote: "Hi C :)

For me, he is very mainstream? Dan will need to decide as he understands the technical position of a book more than I do?

I am presuming there are two diff Nancy Drew books? When I was a ..."


Well, the ones I've got were published in the 90's.
Definitely look forward to seeing your selections. : )


message 38: by TXGAL1 (new)

TXGAL1 Greetings, All!

I was invited to join the group by Douglas and was very glad he asked.

A native Houstonian, I have family in New Zealand and Hawaii. I’ve always loved books, all sorts, but Mystery/Thrillers might be my favorites. Now retired, I’ve finally time to do more reading. Unfortunately, my spouse is not a reader and uninterested in my attempts to share my enthusiasm for books. Consequently, I’m most happy to have found Goodreads and the constant update on not only new titles but also older titles/authors that of who I was unaware.

I have too many favorite authors to mention, but am happy to add to the list.


message 39: by Douglas, Cosmopolitan and Multi-Genre Noir (new)

Douglas Morrison | 211 comments Carmen wrote: "Douglas wrote: "Hi C :)

For me, he is very mainstream? Dan will need to decide as he understands the technical position of a book more than I do?

I am presuming there are two diff Nancy Drew book..."


Hi

I have suggested four but only allowed two, so Dan is splitting them over the next few months.

Some are rather mainstream like the brilliant Joseph Hansen (Have you read his Dave Brandstetter series?) to extreme with the classic Get Carter from Ted Lewis.


message 40: by Douglas, Cosmopolitan and Multi-Genre Noir (new)

Douglas Morrison | 211 comments TXGAL1 wrote: "Greetings, All!

I was invited to join the group by Douglas and was very glad he asked.

A native Houstonian, I have family in New Zealand and Hawaii. I’ve always loved books, all sorts, but Myster..."


Hi,

Your story sounds familiar, none of my kids read or are interested in books and my wife only reads Biographies from TV personalities so I was always the odd one out in that respect.

But as you say GR lets you get in touch with so many that share your passion and even are willing to make an effort to read my work. Unlike the wife :)

Will you be recommending a book or two for next month?

And if you feel daring have you seen the writing contest we put up on Bizarro? Write your own short and let your peers judge you.


message 41: by Ann (last edited Sep 07, 2021 12:41PM) (new)

Ann Crystal (pagesbycrystal) | 26 comments Thank your for the invite, Douglas Morrison.

My name is Ann Crystal. I have not read a mystery/noir in years, yet my love of Noir has never faded. I'm still a fan of the old noir movies (in-general, I'm obsessed with old movies...silents and talkies). When it comes to my writing, I'm always looking for a chance where my stories can absorb the noir style (when proper).

I'm looking forward to being a member of this group. Please do pardon my timing, I do not log-on to Goodreads as often as I would like.


message 42: by Douglas, Cosmopolitan and Multi-Genre Noir (new)

Douglas Morrison | 211 comments Ann wrote: "Thank your for the invite, Douglas Morrison.

My name is Ann Crystal. I have not read a mystery/noir in years, yet my love of Noir has never faded. I'm still a fan of the old noir movies (in-gener..."


Hey that's fine,

You're here, that's what counts.

I said something, somewhere that for me Noir is like the blues it is the beginning of what makes books great, there is a bit of Noir in so many other fields.

I have even been trying to continue the tradition and write new Noir style novels.

Have you read the books that began the idea for the movies?

Regards


message 43: by Dan, Hardboiled Historical American (last edited Sep 08, 2021 03:20AM) (new)

Dan | 19 comments Welcome Carmen and TXGAL1,

It's great to have you with the group. As you look at the bookshelf and read some of the articles on what Hardboiled American Crime and Detective Fiction is, I'm sure you'll start to see we are a group specializing in a fairly narrow sub-genre. We don't do all detective novels or all the thrillers by any means. Other groups cover that well.

Arthur Conan Doyle doesn't qualify because he is 1) British, 2) writing more than a quarter century before our sub-genre begins, and 3) does not use hardboiled language at all; in fact his language can be ornate. Nancy Drew is the right period and written in America, but is the opposite of hardboiled. She is so softboiled that kids read Nancy Drew; I mean writers write her for kids. Kids do not (and should not) read hardboiled. Done well, it's too sophisticated for them.

The emphasis in hardboiled literature is seldom on the detection. The reader usually knows who perpetrated the crime early on and why. The emphasis is on the bringing to justice of the criminal, or attempting to. Catching criminals seldom succeeds outright and tends to involve violence to the good guys; there's always a price. Sometimes we are even supposed to root for the bad guys (as in the James M. Cain bookshelf novel) who are sometimes law enforcement figures, as in my personal favorite on our bookshelf, Pop. 1280. A particularly disturbing example (too much so for even me) of a crime was a series of self-inflicted ones as in They Shoot Horses, Don't They? The ambiguity and tension inherent in the plots makes for complicated moral stakes and raises questions about traditional values.

Some of the authors we read are fairly mainstream: Raymond Chandler, Dashiell Hammett, and James M. Cain perhaps being the best-known examples. Most of the writers in this sub-genre are fairly obscure now, but were once much better known, and deserve to be so again in my opinion because they raise uncomfortable yet worthwhile questions many prefer to escape considering these days.


message 44: by Dan, Hardboiled Historical American (new)

Dan | 19 comments Hi Ann. Noir film is a great gateway to hardboiled literature. We'll welcome your participation at whatever level you can afford. Happy you are here.


message 45: by Douglas, Cosmopolitan and Multi-Genre Noir (new)

Douglas Morrison | 211 comments Morning Dan,

Have you ever considering going on quiz shows?

You always seems to be able to articulate and diagnose an answer for what I would consider a fluid question.


message 46: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Harris (theharrisauthor) | 23 comments Dan wrote: "Welcome Carmen and TXGAL1,

It's great to have you with the group. As you look at the bookshelf and read some of the articles on what Hardboiled American Crime and Detective Fiction is, I'm sure y..."


Interesting observations about Arthur Conan Doyle - some of these things I definitely wasn't aware of. I've always seen Nancy Drew as the sort of character and involved in stories for slightly pre-teen and teens. Perhaps Nancy Drew has also expanded to early elementary/primary school aged kids - books have changed a lot since I was in elementary/primary school.
It sounds like some of the hardboiled American Detective/Crime novels are something that I'd enjoy; interesting elements seem to be involved - I've added one or two to my TBR shelf. : )


message 47: by Carla Remy (new)

Carla Remy | 9 comments Hello, I will introduce myself so as not to be a creepy lurker! I am Carla and I love 1950s books. Not exclusively. I'm trying to read more... living authors. I recently read Blacktop Wasteland. It was very good, but so long (I like that PBO length). Now I'm reading the Doomsters by Ross MacDonald. Right back to 1958.
Favorite book? How about Web of Murder by Harry Whittington.


message 48: by Douglas, Cosmopolitan and Multi-Genre Noir (last edited Sep 09, 2021 08:36AM) (new)

Douglas Morrison | 211 comments Carla Remy wrote: "Hello, I will introduce myself so as not to be a creepy lurker! I am Carla and I love 1950s books. Not exclusively. I'm trying to read more... living authors. I recently read Blacktop Wasteland. It..."

Hi Carla :)

Never heard of them, which is a great thing.

It would greatly help if you were to suggest monthly reads and why as well as authors and publishers in the field we have missed.

And your view and back ground to them, it is always a pleasure to understand what others take from a read / book.

My taste tends to be to nebulous to be a expert in any fields alas.


message 49: by Ann (last edited Sep 09, 2021 02:38PM) (new)

Ann Crystal (pagesbycrystal) | 26 comments Thanks Douglas and Dan. Glad to be a member here.

Douglas Morrison, I have not read any books from those old movies. I read a script once (funny thing, is that I never saw the play/movie for that script). In any case, all I recall from the story-line is what I had to memorize for a class I was taking at that time (I know, terrible me).


message 50: by Douglas, Cosmopolitan and Multi-Genre Noir (new)

Douglas Morrison | 211 comments Ann wrote: "Thanks Douglas and Dan. Glad to be a member here.

Douglas Morrison, I have not read any books from those old movies. I read a script once (funny thing, is that I never saw the play/movie for that..."


You interested in starting then?

Loads of opportunities coming up to extend your reading vocabulary/history? :)


« previous 1
back to top

1116447

Hardboiled American Crime and Other Noir Fiction

unread topics | mark unread


Books mentioned in this topic

Pop. 1280 (other topics)
Clifford's War (other topics)