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The Ten Thousand Doors of January
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message 1: by John (Taloni) (new)

John (Taloni) Taloni (johntaloni) | 3871 comments I'm at about the 25% mark for this book. Got a late start as I only began yesterday. Went looking at the established threads and don't see one for general discussion. Shall we have one here? Spoiler protect for those not as far along and also email digest readers.

Anyhoo, at about the quarter mark this book feels like a mashup between Seanan McGuire's series that starts with Every Heart a Doorway and Lovecraft Country. There's the Doors with a capital D, that appear intermittently and are of tremendous appeal to the people able to go through them. Locke is an apparently benevolent man living in a vast mansion in rural New England, but his actions are fairly self-serving and evil to those he exploits. I get the distinct feeling that there is a much greater evil behind his actions. Certainly he seems to (view spoiler) The MC is of indeterminate race, not black as in Lovecraft Country but still subject to discrimination based on skin color.

The affinity to books and the poetic prose reminds me of Bradbury and his love of libraries.

As for Locke, every time I see his name I wonder if Hobbes might be in the Society, or if there might be a Leviathan nearby...


message 2: by Tassie Dave, S&L Historian (new) - rated it 4 stars

Tassie Dave | 3497 comments Mod
John (Taloni) wrote: "As for Locke, every time I see his name I wonder if Hobbes might be in the Society, or if there might be a Leviathan nearby..."

I picture Locke as bald and chasing smoke monsters 😉


Trike | 8198 comments Tassie Dave wrote: "John (Taloni) wrote: "As for Locke, every time I see his name I wonder if Hobbes might be in the Society, or if there might be a Leviathan nearby..."

I picture Locke as bald and chasing smoke mons..."


I picture & Key.


message 4: by John (Taloni) (new)

John (Taloni) Taloni (johntaloni) | 3871 comments Tassie Dave wrote: "I picture Locke as bald and chasing smoke monsters"

What's that in reference to? I feel so Lost!


message 5: by John (Taloni) (new)

John (Taloni) Taloni (johntaloni) | 3871 comments Hitting the 33% mark now. Seems fairly clear that the woman in the book (view spoiler) Either that or there is some fabulous misdirect going on.

Also, I keep mixing up the storylines. When January (view spoiler)

The "you must read this book" bit is a little too forced for me, and made me flash on The Butterfly Effect. (Great name, it pulled me in, disappointing movie.)

Also, as someone who grew up in Suburban Boston where some of the children of the elite condescended to go to the local high school before trundling off to the Ivy League, you know, so they could spend some time among us unwashed...the scenes with the rich and powerful are simultaneously a trope and all too real. This group might pretend to like you, even allow you to socialize on the outskirts, but you would never be accepted.

When January is offered (view spoiler)


message 6: by John (Taloni) (new)

John (Taloni) Taloni (johntaloni) | 3871 comments Nice series of reveals at about the 50% mark. (view spoiler)


Ryan Dash (ryandash) | 9 comments Here is my review:

4.5 stars. The writing here is something special. There are a large number of similes and metaphors, which could easily be tiring, but they are all apt and enhance the book’s atmosphere. The plot is a page-turner, and the book-within-a-book was well-handled. The characters were extremely well-written; they were developed with just enough backstory to have their actions make sense. The only fault is that the magic system is too soft for my tastes – it would have enhanced the plot if it had been explored in greater detail.


Ryan Dash (ryandash) | 9 comments Some questions I have, spoilers for the whole book: (view spoiler)


Richard Vogel | 208 comments I finished the book and would have given it a four star, as I liked the characters and the main story, though there were some minor issues that undermined it main point.

But, the cutting section really bothered me. I have relations who had issues with cutting and this scene could easily be used by real people to justify their cutting. There really should have been a warning and a hotline number on the first page to let people know this is fantasy and cutting yourself will NOT open doors.


message 10: by John (Taloni) (new)

John (Taloni) Taloni (johntaloni) | 3871 comments Can we please spoiler protect as I requested in the first post? I've read that section, but others may not have.


Richard Vogel | 208 comments My point was that people should know that will happen in the book. There is no other reference as to what actually happened, so it is not much of a spoiler. I felt triggered, as I know someone close it happened to.


Richard Vogel | 208 comments @Ryan
(view spoiler)


message 13: by John (Taloni) (new)

John (Taloni) Taloni (johntaloni) | 3871 comments Just finished and *wow* that was a killer ending! I expected some lame setup for a trilogy but nope, satisfying ending. Altho I will gladly read a sequel. some parts subverted traditional narrative structure but in a way that worked. As for the trope "everyone is the hero of their own story," nailed that one.


Melina | 43 comments @ Ryan

Agreed on your comment regarding the magic system. It was a bit too soft and could have used more backstory to make it more interesting.

*Spoiler Alert*
What I enjoyed most about the story was the way Harrow developed several character stories that didn't seem connected in any way until about 75% of the way in. At that point, I thought, how did I miss this?


message 15: by Ryan (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ryan Dash (ryandash) | 9 comments @Richard (view spoiler)


Richard Vogel | 208 comments (view spoiler)


message 17: by Tina (new) - rated it 3 stars

Tina (javabird) | 680 comments Richard wrote: "I finished the book and would have given it a four star, as I liked the characters and the main story, though there were some minor issues that undermined it main point.

But, the cutting section r..."


That ruined it for me. I already had a hard time with what happened to Bad. I don’t think I will be finishing it.


message 18: by John (Taloni) (new)

John (Taloni) Taloni (johntaloni) | 3871 comments Some news about Bad: (view spoiler)


LouLouReads | 22 comments I'm actually very glad that there was no warning about (view spoiler), as I probably would have either skipped it altogether or spent the first part anxiously waiting for that scene, and instead I really enjoyed the book.

I agree that I would have liked more info on the magic system - it reminded me a lot of the Language in The Invisible Library series, and so without more detail I sometimes found it difficult to keep the magic system in this world separate in my head. That said, I would be interested to read another story set in this world to see how the magic system was fleshed out.

(view spoiler).


Charles Cadenhead (thatcharliedude) | 186 comments @John, thanks for the thread. I'm about 25%-29% of the way through and I was thinking about Lemming it before I read your post, including the spoilers. I think I now know just enough of the story to keep me interested.
So far, I feel like the build up in chapter 1 of "there are thousands of doors to elsewhere" has been a little misleading. I was expecting more fantasy and less introspective. Now after reading a couple of spoilers there I think I have enough hints to see where the story is heading and I want to continue reading to see if I'm right. Thanks again!


Aaron (oldwindways) | 123 comments Ryan wrote: "Some questions I have, spoilers for the whole book:"

RE: Threshold
(view spoiler)

Regarding Bad, the author addresses pressing dog related questions here.


Katie Boyd (katidid) | 3 comments bit of a tangent: Edwardian dress. POCKETS?!

There are several points (early on, I'm about 70 pages in) when it is mentioned that January tucks things into her skirts. books as well as other things. And I feel like I've heard that phrase enough for it to be a trope without ever thinking about it further (like books I used to read as a kid, maybe Anne of Greene Gables or that style of book) This only JUST occurred to me.
Did Edwardian dresses have lots of secret pockets in the skirts??!!! Where are these things being tucked? If there were no pocket, it would just fall to the floor when she stood up. And we're not even talking little tiny pockets either. A book is a pretty significant object to be tucked away, unnoticed in a skirt. So, now I'm imagining that all the old fashioned fluffy skirts were secretly like cargo pants under there. There hasn't been decent pockets in women's dresses for at least the last hundred years. Did we have them and lose them when dresses got smaller and more form-fitting?


Trike | 8198 comments Katie wrote: "bit of a tangent: Edwardian dress. POCKETS?!

There are several points (early on, I'm about 70 pages in) when it is mentioned that January tucks things into her skirts. books as well as other thing..."


Purses and clutches are the modern evolution ye olde timey pockets. Pockets were pouches worn inside a skirt or dress and accessed via a slit in the material. Maybe that’s what they’re talking about.

(I know this because my m-i-l is into fashion and is a dollmaker. Eventually you run out of things to talk about over dinner.)


message 25: by John (Taloni) (new)

John (Taloni) Taloni (johntaloni) | 3871 comments Had an uncomfortable insight a few days after finishing and it goes something like this: Was Locke right? (view spoiler)


message 26: by Iain (new) - rated it 3 stars

Iain Bertram (iain_bertram) | 1276 comments John (Taloni) wrote: "Had an uncomfortable insight a few days after finishing and it goes something like this: Was Locke right? The book is set mostly in the early 1900s. January is fighting to keep the Doors open and ..."

My take on Locke is that he is a gilded age monster!


message 27: by Seth (new) - rated it 3 stars

Seth | 301 comments John (Taloni) wrote: "Had an uncomfortable insight a few days after finishing and it goes something like this: Was Locke right? "

Well, (view spoiler)


message 28: by Ryan (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ryan Dash (ryandash) | 9 comments In general, change has led to an overall improvement in the human condition, numerous historical mishaps notwithstanding. See Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress


Jenny (Reading Envy) (readingenvy) | 2839 comments Katie wrote: "bit of a tangent: Edwardian dress. POCKETS?!

There are several points (early on, I'm about 70 pages in) when it is mentioned that January tucks things into her skirts. books as well as other thing..."


Unless there is a reveal that her own world is not our world (which could happen, I mean, I'm only halfway through) I think there are so many layers that she's tucking it into an underwaistband, which would keep it close to her skin but secure. Maybe a corset or other such undergarment a girl would wear prior to a corset.


message 30: by Rick (new)

Rick | 2778 comments John (Taloni) wrote: "Had an uncomfortable insight a few days after finishing and it goes something like this: Was Locke right? The book is set mostly in the early 1900s. January is fighting to keep the Doors open and ..."

Another take on this (view spoiler)


message 31: by John (Taloni) (new)

John (Taloni) Taloni (johntaloni) | 3871 comments ^ Yep, and on that note, there could be a sequel (please, a sequel!) in which, just spitballing here (view spoiler)


Ian (RebelGeek) Seal (rebel-geek) | 519 comments Rick wrote: "John (Taloni) wrote: "Had an uncomfortable insight a few days after finishing and it goes something like this: Was Locke right? The book is set mostly in the early 1900s. January is fighting to kee..."

11.22.63


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