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Our Mutual Friend
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PAST Quarterly reads > Our Mutual Friend - Dickens; 2020 4Q 2020

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Kristel (kristelh) | 4144 comments Mod
It is hard to believe that it is time to start a 4th Quarter book.
Host: Valerie
Book: Our Mutual Friend
Author: Charles Dickens
Reviews go here: https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...


Valerie Brown | 610 comments I'm glad you posted this early, Kristel - but I have to admit I had a minor panic attack thinking I was behind in my reading schedule!

I will be starting Our Mutual Friend around the last week in Sept. That should get me through the first third by Oct. 1. I will post questions around that time.

At the moment it seems to make sense to divide it into these three parts:
1. parts 1 to 7
2. parts 8 to 14
3 parts 15 to the end (part 20)


message 3: by George P. (last edited Sep 08, 2020 11:37AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

George P. | 495 comments I'll start it soon. The Kindle ebook is free. You may also be able to download e-audiobook of it from your library.
Thanks for being host Valerie.


Valerie Brown | 610 comments George P. wrote: "I'll start it soon. The Kindle ebook is free. You may also be able to download e-audiobook of it from your library.
Thanks for being host Valerie."


Yes, thanks for pointing that out George. I did get it on my kindle, but will also be using a paper copy for reference.


George P. | 495 comments I've read just 7% so far. The narrative jumps around a lot here and I was feeling kind of lost so I read the synopsis/comments in my copy of "1001 Books..." I sort of wish I hadn't as it revealed a significant bit of the story that it may have been better to keep as a surprise, but at least I feel more oriented in the story.
The eccentric Dickens characters are entertaining, as always.


message 6: by Jamie (new)

Jamie Barringer (Ravenmount) (ravenmount) | 478 comments I located this book on Project Gutenberg and bookmarked the url, so when I finish Don Quixote (soon, I hope), I'll be starting Our Mutual Friend.


message 7: by George P. (last edited Sep 25, 2020 06:37PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

George P. | 495 comments Jamie wrote: "I located this book on Project Gutenberg ....

Or you can download the free Kindle app (for desktop/laptop or phone as well as the actual Kindle device) and get it from Amazon free).

BTW one might wonder if, at 880 pages, this is the longest Dickens novel. It's not, that would be Bleak House at 1,036 pages hardback edition).


Valerie Brown | 610 comments GR is having a technical problem at the moment, so I just lost my edit of comment 2. :( So, I'll try again here...

This description is from the Penguin Random House website:

"A satiric masterpiece about the allure and peril of money, Our Mutual Friend revolves around the inheritance of a dust-heap where the rich throw their trash. When the body of John Harmon, the dust-heap’s expected heir, is found in the Thames, fortunes change hands surprisingly, raising to new heights “Noddy” Boffin, a low-born but kindly clerk who becomes “the Golden Dustman.” Charles Dickens’s last complete novel, Our Mutual Friend encompasses the great themes of his earlier works: the pretensions of the nouveaux riches, the ingenuousness of the aspiring poor, and the unfailing power of wealth to corrupt all who crave it. With its flavorful cast of characters and numerous subplots, Our Mutual Friend is one of Dickens’s most complex—and satisfying—novels."


When I was searching for reader's guides, I found this website which seems clear and accessible for the general reader (so many of the academic ones are.... well, for academics!):
https://stevenjventurino.com/omf-seri...

I liked this insight into how this novel would have been read:
"Our Mutual Friend was first published in nineteen monthly parts (the final part was a double, making it twenty) from May 1864 to November 1865. Victorian readers enjoyed and absorbed the novel one portion at a time, discussing the story’s gradual unfolding with friends and family and anticipating the turns each new installment would take. "

Here is other interesting and helpful information. The first four chapters are important, as they (apparently) set the tone for the remainder of the novel.

">For readers in 1864, these four chapters formed the entirety of the first installment. It was published in May of that year in a paper-bound volume of its own, sandwiched between pages of advertisements. Readers would have to wait an entire month to read the next installment.

>Notice the prose style in each of the opening chapters. We will see variations on these styles throughout the novel. Here, they introduce the novel’s main tones and techniques, rather like the beginning of a classical symphony. Chapter 1.1 offers a look at Dickens’s remarkably cinematic control of sensual information, while chapter 1.2 shows how the narrator’s voice changes when it is “channelled” through a particular character’s consciousness (here, Twemlow). Chapter 1.3 shows how this narrative channeling can move through several characters, and chapter 1.4 indulges Dickens’s ability to blend dialogue with narrative for stage-like, cinematic effects. Also, notice how often the narrator refers to characters as objects, or even dismembered parts.

>This opening installment establishes several themes that seem likely to play out in the novel. Among other issues, keep an eye on any of the following: past versus future, young versus old, aspirations, education, reading, avarice, identity, the effects of having or lacking money, the nature of death, and the value of garbage."

I will be pulling questions from this reading guide and one or two others. If you are interested in exploring Our Mutual Friend in even more depth, I would definitely recommend having a look at this site first.


Valerie Brown | 610 comments As we begin our cover to cover journey through this novel, what are your thoughts on reading a long (and drawn out) story as a serialization? I find this aspect of the work interesting, and maybe we can think about this at the outset and revisit when we finish.


George P. | 495 comments In those bygone days before television and movies, a serialized long novel could be a shared experience with people you know who are also reading along, sort of like our group reads (esp the longer, quarterly reads).
I might not like having to wait for the next part when I've finished what's been published, but it could be fun.
BTW, I am now 1/3 thorough my reading of the novel. I was pushing myself to get that far by now, but now I can slow down a bit.


message 11: by Valerie (last edited Oct 03, 2020 04:39AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Valerie Brown | 610 comments I'm a fast reader, but I've purposely slowed down to try to experience in a small way the serialization. I've been reading a part per day (with the odd day missed). I'm finding this quite an enjoyable way to approach the book - although Dickens writing is so cinematic and compelling it is hard to stop! It has been interesting to approach the book this way, because I can really see how he is building the story.

I only have parts 6 + 7 to read (for the first third). I am hoping to post the questions for the first third on Monday.


Amanda Dawn | 1113 comments I realize a lot of these big older books were first written as serializations, but tbh I'll probably plow through it at once on audio lol (I did the same thing for Vanity Fair). I will keep in mind while reasing that that was the original format. I'm going to get started on this one as soon as I finish listening to my current TBR.


Valerie Brown | 610 comments Questions for our first part:

1. Why may the novel be called Our Mutual Friend? What are some advantages of the title?

2. How does Harmon’s death affect Bella, both emotionally and in terms of her future?

3. What are some features of Dickens’ chapter titles? How much and what kinds of information do they convey?

4. What purpose is served by constructing a novel with such elaborate plots and subplots? How would this structure have been useful in the organization of serial parts?

5. Dickens was a great admirer of the theater and adapted several of his novels for public dramatic readings. In what way may his experience in the theater have influenced his construction of scenes and chapters? Can you give instances of scenes which might have been effective on the stage?

6. How would you characterize Dickens’ descriptions? Are they realistic? Exaggerated? Emotion-laden?

7. What are some forms of humor which pervade the novel? Is his humor sarcastic? Friendly? What are some instances of covert jokes or ironies embedded in the plot? (e. g. Silas Wegg’s ignorance of the title of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire)

8. How does the novel represent themes of literacy and popular culture?

9. In general, how do fathers seem to be characterized in this novel?

10. One of the novel’s central questions = What are people supposed to do with a fortune? What are your views on this, and how does your viewpoint affect your feelings about the various characters?

11. There are a lot of characters in this novel! Have any of them particularly jumped out to you (no matter their importance to the narrative)?


message 14: by George P. (last edited Oct 06, 2020 08:18AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

George P. | 495 comments I'll skip the 1st question for now, as that may have spoiler info for some, except to say that it refers to Mr. Rokesmith.
I'll respond to questions 2 and 3 for now.

"2. How does Harmon’s death affect Bella, both emotionally and in terms of her future?":
Her "fiancee"'s death didn't seem to have much effect on Bella emotionally, even though she wore black ("I am here in this ridiculous mourning, which I hate") except that she worried about becoming an "old maid" if she didn't get married pretty soon. She said to her parents "How COULD I like him, left to him in a will, like a dozen of spoons...". She had anticipated being the wife of a fairly wealthy man, so this was a big disappointment to her. Bella doesn't make a very good impression on the reader in this chapter- I recall someone writing that nearly all of Dickens' women characters are rather saintly.

3. "What are some features of Dickens’ chapter titles? How much and what kinds of information do they convey?"
The chapter titles give a little preview of what action occurs in the chapter, such as "Two New Servants", and "Cupid Prompted". I think I have seen these sort of chapter titles in other old novels. They don't give much information but could act as a sort of teaser to cause the reader to be curious about what lies ahead, and maintain interest.


message 15: by Valerie (last edited Oct 06, 2020 08:52AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Valerie Brown | 610 comments George P. wrote: "I'll skip the 1st question for now, as that may have spoiler info for some, except to say that it refers to Mr. Rokesmith.
I'll respond to questions 2 and 3 for now.

"2. How does Harmon’s death af..."



I agree, Bella does not come off well here. I have to admit I was a little surprised (?) about that. Of course, I am now onto part 2 and you get to see more of her and how she is developing (which is all I'll say right now....).

I enjoy those type of leading chapter titles. Sometimes they are more obscure and other times you have the 'aha' moment when the title is specifically referred to in the body of the chapter. They add a lot of enjoyment for me.


message 16: by George P. (last edited Oct 18, 2020 11:10AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

George P. | 495 comments I'm making steady progress- now at 52%, so I just need to read about 1% a day to finish at the beginning of December.
I have "gotten into" the storyline pretty well now, so I think I'll have no problem sticking with it.
There is more sarcastic, parodying humor in this novel than in any of the other Dickens novels I've read. Although I'm reading it in text format, I imagine a very sarcastic tone of voice in some of the sections. I think it is probably Dickens' funniest novel.


Diane  | 2046 comments I read this a few years ago. It is one of my favorites by Dickens and one of 3 books of his that I gave 5 stars to. I would love to re-read it, but probably won't, given its length. I am curious to see what others think about it. I'll see if I can work it in to my schedule, as I love it so much. I am actually doing well on limiting re-reads this year, so this one might be justified.


George P. | 495 comments I set a progress goal for myself of reaching 2/3 through by November 1, and I just made it yesterday. I think the characters are mostly very realistic, the plot sometimes less so.


Valerie Brown | 610 comments I agree about the humor, there have been many LOL moments or just quieter appreciation of the wit. I can understand why it is Diane's favorite. I am 2/3 of the way through and already am predicting 5*. Because I am reading it VERY!!! slowly (as I said above) I thought today it might be fun after I'm done to sit down and read it in one gulp (as I normally would).


Valerie Brown | 610 comments As for the questions:

2. I suppose emotionally his death threw her off her stride a little, but she didn't know him and seemed to resent being promised without her consent, so I think she is relieved. However, it does affect her dreams/wishes/hopes to (easily) marry a wealthy man.

3. I love chapter titles like the ones Dickens uses. They allude to events that will occur in that given chapter, but they tend to be very opaque. They help draw you in.

4. I suspect that part of it was the mechanics of constructing a successful serialization. If you are going to write 20 parts over the course of a year, there needs to be a lot of happenings. As well, it is my understanding (from researching the novel) that Dickens had an agenda to present social issues to his readers, and many plots and sub-plots would make that workable.

5. I don't have examples (oops, bad host) because it is quite a while since I read this part.... but I am finding the whole novel very theatrical/cinematic. I am really enjoying the scene setting, and the atmosphere(s).

9. I included this question because I hadn't really noticed anything of note about fathers, and I was wondering what you all thought. The majority of them don't seem to be particularly good people, I can say that!

11. I wanted to ask this because the Podsnap chapter 'Podsnappery' really jumped out at me! What a bunch of awful people, but brilliantly skewered.


Amanda Dawn | 1113 comments I meant to get around to this last month- but ya know- life happens. So here I go now- gonna have to try to remember everything that happens in what part, that was one dense book.

1. I won’t lie, I read the synopsis before reading the book (so I could keep up with the audio) so I knew the twist beforehand and it seems to be where the title comes from. Will say it relates to John Rokesmith. I guess an advantage is in a huge cast of characters that don’t necessarily interact a lot at the beginning you wonder where the connection (the mutual friend) will end up being.

2. At first she seems like someone more concerned with the benefits he was supposed to bring her than an emotional connection.

3. Didn’t notice the chapter titles because of audio, usually I find them revealing in his work and don’t mind that because it sets up an interesting expectation for what you are about to read.

4. To give a pragmatic and no fun answer he was paid by the word so I don’t blame him lol. It also fits the serialization format well and would have served the same place that prestige TV seems to fill in society now and created a lot of points for readers to fixate on, become engaged in, and chat about.

5. I feel like there are a lot of instances of mistaken/not yet revealed identity in this book that would have played well on stage because the audience could visualize exactly who is who before the characters would know.

6. Lengthy lol. See paid by word comment above.

7. It’s not in this part (closer to the end of the book) Boffin wandering into a bookshop and being like “where’s the books on how to be a miser?” is just so stupid in its transparency that it is kind of funny. Also Wegg’s role as a kind of trickster villain is pretty comical. The humor does seem to be a little bit at the expense at the kind of people portrayed din the book.

8. It seems to have portrayed the populace as “eager to look well read” while not at all being well read. The Decline and Fall joke from question 7 illustrates this quite well (Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire seems to be the Classical Lit version of “A Brief History of Time” in being a bestselling book that no one has actually read through lol).

9. Not well! Dickens’ own baggage with his father seems to be well on display here.

10. I’ve grown up working class and leftist so my views on affluence in our culture are…I think distrustful is a fair word lol. Because of that I tend to feel like people should have a sense of personal responsibility and “paying it forward” with a fortune after they’ve secured a comfortable quality of life for themselves. And by that I don’t mean “the filthy rich should also give to charity”, but “once you’re comfortable and your actual quality of life can’t be improved by more wealth you should be willing to redistribute the rest to where it will sow significant change for significant societal change/more people’s quality of life”. Due to that, I liked how the book criticized Hexam for Nouveau Riche “forgetting where he came from” ways, but wasn’t sure I completely jived with how the Boffin’s story was handled (won’t completely spoil now).

11. For some reason I immediately liked and was interested in Jenny Wren.


Valerie Brown | 610 comments I like your 'paid by the word' observation, Amanda. It is interesting to me that Dickens makes 'paid by the word' work well. Whereas others (yes, Henry James I mean you) make me want to poke an eye out with all the excess verbiage.


Kristel (kristelh) | 4144 comments Mod
1. Why may the novel be called Our Mutual Friend? What are some advantages of the title? Dickens writes about society thus this title would reflect staying within that society, that class. Dickens frequently gave his books titles of characters. Exceptions; The Christmas Carol, Bleak House.

Mutual means shared or friendship that has reciprocity.


Kristel (kristelh) | 4144 comments Mod
I agree with George. Before TV and even radio shows. A serial reading adventure would have been the thing. I remember even in my early years, magazines like Redbook etc. or even Reader's Digest would have shorten stories for people to read that month. And now with technology there are those that do a daily lit read on their phones.


Amanda Dawn | 1113 comments Valerie wrote: "I like your 'paid by the word' observation, Amanda. It is interesting to me that Dickens makes 'paid by the word' work well. Whereas others (yes, Henry James I mean you) make me want to poke an eye..."

Lol, Thanks Valerie. I'm retty sure Victor Hugo worked under a similar arrangement, which I think helps explain why Les Mis and The Hunchback are like 1/3 essays about Napoleonic history/the Paris sewer system/ Gothic Parisian architecture lol.


message 26: by Valerie (last edited Nov 11, 2020 04:08PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Valerie Brown | 610 comments I've tended to avoid the ones that have been turned into musicals! **
Someday, I will read The Hunchback.... when I'm ready for the excess verbiage!

**not to imply I don't like musicals, 'cause I actually do, quite a lot....


message 27: by Book (new) - rated it 4 stars

Book Wormy | 2008 comments Mod
I started this one at the start of November my approach has been a chapter a day so I am currently at chapter 14.

The first few chapters were hard to get in to but now the narrative is flowing for me and I am enjoying it.

BTW I originally downloaded the free Kindle version it was awful I had to return it. Another reviewer said it felt like the book had been translated from English to another language and then back again by different translator which is a good summary of how it felt. It was also not edited and there were mentions of the Internet and Ebooks in the first few chapters that were really jarring.

I will come back and tackle the questions once I get to the end of Part One.


message 28: by Book (new) - rated it 4 stars

Book Wormy | 2008 comments Mod
Hmm my copy is split into 4 parts so I am actually at 28% not 33% but here goes I will answer what I can.

1. I took Mutual Friend to mean a friend in common several of the characters are connected via Harmon's death so I was seeing him as the Mutual Friend.

2. Bella is now a widow without having been married which at the time would seem like an ill omen.

3. They give you an idea of what will happen in the chapter.

4. Paid by the word the more words the more money LOL. It also keeps the serialisation interesting like an old fashioned EastEnders or for those not in the UK a long running soap opera.

5. I would say most of the book would look great on screen or stage. Particularly the Harmon house.

6. Exaggerated the characters are caricatures but in a good way and he exaggerates other areas to emphasise his point.

7. I find the jokes tend to be around character names and occupations.

8. There is a section about education being available to the boy but not the girl in a family.

9. The fathers to me at least seem different you have Harmon who writes his children out of the will, you have the boatman who involves his daughter in his business and you have the inheritors looking to adopt a child. (I have a bad head and my memory of names is shot)

10. I love how they are using their money to help others in the name of the dead. I think what they are doing is honourable and I hope I would be the same.

11. I loved the horse I think his name was Edmund who knew where the Harmon house would and communicated in snorts.


Patrick Robitaille | 954 comments 1. Having seen the previous comments/answers, I might say that I am a little confused. I thought this concept revolved around Julius Handford… 😉

2. Bella, promised to John Harmon, has some conflicting emotions about his death. Being the “widow” of a man she did not really want, she is also lamenting the fact that Harmon’s potential wealth is now escaping her and her mercenary ways. This latter emotion seems to be the overriding one.

3. They provide either a very descriptive summary of the chapter, some paraphrased clues to its contents, or a portal for several clever (and sometimes funny) meanings with respect to the development of the plot or of the characters.

4. Apart from the “practical” answers (e.g. paid by the word; it’s a long serial), it also helps to maintain the suspense and the reader’s interest. However, it is a fine line to thread upon, as too many subplots and minor infrequent characters can effectively lose the reader. Fortunately, it’s not the case here.

5. Most of the dinner scenes (at the Podsnaps, at the Veneerings, at the Wilfers, at the Boffins) would translate very well on the stage. The scenes at the Podsnaps and Veneerings are prototypes for The Dinner Game (Le Dîner de Cons).

6. I always have the word “caricature” in mind when I read Dickens. However, as he tries to instil some social commentary to this novel, there are parts which are a lot more realistic than just being caricatures.

7. There are several types of humor in this novel, some being more slapstick than others (e.g. words/sentence repetition). As usual with Dickens, the characters’ names are sometimes a quick way to develop a joke.

8. I find it quite interesting that Boffin knows about the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, yet he doesn’t know how to read, while Wegg can quite well read, but is totally ignorant of the title of the book. It is also fascinating to see the obstinacy of some of the poor classes to refuse any type of education for their offspring (e.g. Gaffer Hexam towards his son) on the premise that it would corrupt them and won’t do any good.

9. Not in a very good light. Either they are too weak or too strong.

10. The Boffins seem, at the beginning, to adopt a reasonably generous attitude towards sharing their good fortune (e.g. hiring Wegg and Rokesmith; looking after Bella; trying to adopt a son). Most of the other characters see it as a way of getting out of their own circumstances, to various levels of envy and greed.

11. Twemlow is an interesting gap filler and would definitely be the “con” in the Dinner Game. Hopefully, his fate improves later in the novel (I have a feeling it won’t).


Valerie Brown | 610 comments Patrick wrote: "1. Having seen the previous comments/answers, I might say that I am a little confused. I thought this concept revolved around Julius Handford… 😉

2. Bella, promised to John Harmon, has some conflic..."



I liked Twemlow, and........ want to add more, but don't want to spoil anything! ;)


Kristel (kristelh) | 4144 comments Mod
I finished the whole book finally. This first part I read quite awhile ago (October). I always enjoy Dickens books. His people are characters but they also are people you grow very attached to and cheer on. Bella and her sister seem a bit superficial initially. Bella's husband to be dies, she misses out on her fortune but she moves in with the ones who inherit the fortune. The one thing I can say about Dicken's novels. Endings generally are good/happy with things working out for the good guy and the bad guy not so much.


message 32: by Diane (last edited Dec 18, 2020 07:02PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Diane  | 2046 comments 1. Why may the novel be called Our Mutual Friend? What are some advantages of the title?
Let's just say the title refers to John. It is difficult to answer this question in full and not give some of the plot away. Basically, the characters in the book have lives that overlap in ways.

2. How does Harmon’s death affect Bella, both emotionally and in terms of her future?
Emotionally, she seems more annoyed than anything, as this now complicates her life. As she had yet to mean Harmon, she really has no true emotional attachment to him. In terms of her future, she has essentially been made a widow before having an opportunity to be married. Her prospects of wealth are now gone, since she was not Harmon's wife.

3. What are some features of Dickens’ chapter titles? How much and what kinds of information do they convey?
The titles give clues as to what will occur. This probably has to do with the fact that they were realeased as serialized stories.

4. What purpose is served by constructing a novel with such elaborate plots and subplots? How would this structure have been useful in the organization of serial parts?
As others mentioned.

6. How would you characterize Dickens’ descriptions? Are they realistic? Exaggerated? Emotion-laden?
I would say they are exaggerated but realistic at the same time.

I will come back and answer the remaining questions later.


message 33: by Pip (new) - rated it 5 stars

Pip | 1419 comments As usual, I ignore the questions when I start a book and I realise that this was unwise in the case of Dickens because it is all too easy to get muddled about the sequence! I adore Dickens and find the idea of racing through the rest of the book before the deadline quite appealing. My daughter has decided to join me so we will spend the next week reading and discussing the book and The Bridgertons will just have to wait until the new year! In the 60's, when New Zealand had just one television station, everyone would watch the same drama series such as The Prisoner or Norman Conquests and it would be the topic of discussion until the next episode in a week's time, which was somewhat comparable. I do like the idea of pausing to reflect on what has been read so far. I am up to Chapter 11, so will try to answer as I go from now on.
1. Our Mutual Friend is not obvious as the beginning, at least not to me. The phrase has been used, and the identity revealed around chapter 9, I think. It is a suitably opaque title to puzzle readers in the first installment.
2. Bella's financial situation is dealt a blow, but she had no emotional attachment to the deceased so her callous attitude is understandable.
3. The titles are whimsical or satirical, but they do provide some information on what they are about.
4. All the characters and the subplots are to keep the reader's interest, and to keep the reader alert!
5. Not the first chapter! But the social settings would suit the theatre very well.
6. Often Dickens' characters are caricutures, but while exaggerated they are often sympathietic.
7. The tone is often satirical, there is word play, and many characters are oblivious to their ignorance about things which Dickens presupposes that the reader wil know, such as the title and contents of Gibbons Decline and Fall.
8. Some characters are illiterate, such as Boffin and Jesse Hexam, who doesn't value education at all. Then there is Silas Wegg who is not as educated as he thinks. Then there is Lizzie Hexam who values education highly and wants her brother to have one.
9. Ineffectual or absent.
10. It depends. If one acquires a fortune through diligence and good luck one usually learns how to use the money along the way. If one is suddenly made rich one can become profligate and self important. Dickens is a master at satirising the nouveux riches.
11. Lizzie Hexam is a sympathetic character. I also like the Boffins.


Valerie Brown | 610 comments Pip wrote: "As usual, I ignore the questions when I start a book and I realise that this was unwise in the case of Dickens because it is all too easy to get muddled about the sequence! I adore Dickens and find..."

That sounds fun - to read this with your daughter! In hindsight, I wish had had a real life person to read it with...... not that you all aren't fun, haha.


message 35: by George P. (last edited Dec 28, 2020 09:06PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

George P. | 495 comments Reading the latest comments I became aware that I hadn't posted to this thread since Nov 1, when I was at the 2/3 point. I did finish on Nov 27th.
I had a good time reading it. I've now read seven Dickens books (including A Christmas Carol which is really a novella); all are in the 1001 list, along with three others. Most were deleted in later editions. I would like to read The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby but I think it will probably not be in the next year.

Off-topic I will note that as a hospital nurse I have spent 2 days in the last week giving covid vaccinations to our workers, and was able to get one myself. I just got a sore shoulder for about a day, like the flu vaccine usually does. Hope you all will get one in the coming months and we can get back to normal soon.


Diane  | 2046 comments George P. wrote: "Off-topic I will note that as a hospital nurse I have spent 2 days in the last week giving covid vaccinations to our workers, and was able to get one myself. I just got a sore shoulder for about a day, like the flu vaccine usually does. Hope you all will get one in the coming months and we can get back to normal soon."

Fantastic that you were able to get the vaccine! I had no idea that you were a nurse. I am, too. I am not a clinical nurse (I teach nursing students), so I am not in the first tier of the vaccines. I hope to receive one soon, as I accompany my students for clinical in healthcare facilities.


Kristel (kristelh) | 4144 comments Mod
George P. wrote: "Reading the latest comments I became aware that I hadn't posted to this thread since Nov 1, when I was at the 2/3 point. I did finish on Nov 27th.
I had a good time reading it. I've now read seven..."


Did not know that you were a nurse George. I am an advanced practice nurse in psych/MH


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