Judy Bolton Fans discussion

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01: General > Pelagie Doane, Artist/Illustrator, Judy Bolton Series

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message 1: by William (new)

William Land (williamland) | 1253 comments Mod
"#19: The Secret of the Musical Tree" is the last book in the series which is illustrated by the talented Pelagie Doane. who was a personal friend of the author's.

I wonder why Doane was replaced by a new artist with the next and subsequent books?

I can't recall the source, but I am certain that some fan or some fan website within the series book collectors' community had shared a preliminary sketch or preliminary sketches that Doane had done for "The Warning on the Window."

Could people with relevant information, please respond to this discussion thread?

Thanks.


message 2: by Peter (new)

Peter Clark | 89 comments Her illustrations in the Melody Lane series are stunning. So sophisticated and are such a wonderful example of the times.
For a long time I leaned twords Ms. Doane as the artist for the original dust jacket of Nancy Drew " The Clue of the Broken Locket". Russell Tandy did the frontispiece for the book and has been credited at time for the cover, but one only has to compare it to his other work and you realize he couldn't have. I guess we will never know who did that one.
Back to Miss Doane, if anyone gets the chance you must see these other pictures in Melody Lane they are wonderful.


message 3: by Peter (new)

Peter Clark | 89 comments "towards", sorry about the spelling error. Was out in the sun too long today.


message 4: by Lindsay (new)

Lindsay Stroh | 137 comments Pelagie Doane was especially good at drawing children. She illustrated the copies I have of Heidi, Heidi Grows Up and Heidi's children, and they are precious. Unfortunately, Pelagie's health, both physical and mental, declined in later years. I know that Mom was not happy with the cover of Musical Tree. She wrote to her editor saying, "Pelagie made Judy too tall and the tree too small," and "Judy seems to be wearing her grandmother's dress." Looking at that cover, I can see that Judy is somewhat out of proportion. I understand that Pelagie was quite disappointed when a new artist was chosen, but she and Mom managed to stay friends. If you have a copy of JUDY BOLTON COUNTRY, Mom writes quite a lot about Pelagie. One of Pelagie's last books as author and artist was "Understanding Kim," but Pelagie was having trouble with the text. Mom became the ghost writer for that book, published in 1962. Mom said she was especially impressed with "A Small Child's Bible" in which Pelagie retold 70 Bible stories in terms small children could understand. Pelagie died in 1966.


message 5: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 162 comments Doane is nice, but a little artificial looking. My vote goes to Tandy


message 6: by Peter (new)

Peter Clark | 89 comments Tandy is my all time favorite series book illustrator. He visually defined the whole Nancy Drew mystique and her look. I like his Hardy Boy covers too.


message 7: by William (last edited Oct 12, 2020 10:10AM) (new)

William Land (williamland) | 1253 comments Mod
Lindsay wrote: << ... I know that Mom was not happy with the cover of Musical Tree. She wrote to her editor saying, "Pelagie made Judy too tall and the tree too small," and "Judy seems to be wearing her grandmother's dress." ...>>

I noticed that Judy was too tall on this cover, but I didn't think about the tree being small. Still, it's a lovely cover. The three young girls are drawn exceptionally well and true to their descriptions in the book. As is Judy in a brown dress even if she is too tall and the dress is somewhat dated.


message 8: by William (new)

William Land (williamland) | 1253 comments Mod
Lindsay wrote: << ... I understand that Pelagie was quite disappointed when a new artist was chosen ...>>

I assume the decision to chose a new artist for the series illustrations was made by the Grosset and Dunlap art department. At the time, Bill Gillies was hired to replace artists who worked on the Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys series. Generally, I disliked his work on the Nancy Drew series. Sometimes her eyes were definitely brown, not blue, and he often made her too young.

I don't know who is the artist that replaced Pelagie Doane, but I really like the covers for the wraparound spine dustjacket for "The Haunted Attic," "The Yellow Phantom" and "The Voice in the Suitcase."


message 9: by William (new)

William Land (williamland) | 1253 comments Mod
Kathleen wrote: "Doane is nice, but a little artificial looking. My vote goes to Tandy"

Peter wrote: "Tandy is my all time favorite series book illustrator. He visually defined the whole Nancy Drew mystique and her look. I like his Hardy Boy covers too."

Russell H. Tandy definitely was a consistent artist with the quality of his artwork. I especially love his illustrations on the 1940s dustjackets and his updated 1940s frontispieces for the Nancy Drew series.

Like Peter, I, too, like his Hardy Boys covers and the one he did for the Beverly Gray series.

Another consistent artist is Thelma Gooch who illustrated the Blythe Girls series. Her illustrations are gorgeous.


message 10: by J. Michael (new)

J. Michael | 130 comments Peter wrote: "For a long time I leaned towards Ms. Doane as the artist for the original dust jacket of Nancy Drew " The Clue of the Broken Locket". Russell Tandy did the frontispiece for the book and has been credited at time for the cover, but one only has to compare it to his other work and you realize he couldn't have. I guess we will never know who did that one."

I am almost positive, after many years of careful research, that the artist who did the artwork for "The Clue in the Broken Locket" dustjacket was an artist by the name of Norman Braley. He also did the original dustjackets for the last two Outdoor Girls books, #22 "The Outdoor Girls in the Air" and #23 "The Outdoor Girls in Desert Valley," which were published during that time period. All three jackets featured distorted bodies, heavy outlining, and primary Sunday cartoon colors.

Personally, I love Pelagie Doane's artwork which was very stylized in the 1930's and gradually became more true-to-life in the 1940's and 1950's. I've always been offended when people insisted that she did the DJ for "Broken Locket." Ms. Doane was almost unique in receiving prominent credit for her artistic contributions (the other greats like Russell H. Tandy, Thelma Gooch, J. Clemens Gretta, etc. never received "Illustrated by" billing on their jackets), and there is no way that Doane ever would have turned in the amateurish drawing of Nancy that appeared on "Broken Locket." I think the jacket for "The Clue in the Patchwork Quilt" is a masterpiece, every bit as great as Margaret Sutton's beautifully written story.


message 11: by Peter (new)

Peter Clark | 89 comments Wow! That's great information on Norman Braley. Thanks!


message 12: by William (new)

William Land (williamland) | 1253 comments Mod
J. Michael wrote: "Peter wrote: "For a long time I leaned towards Ms. Doane as the artist for the original dust jacket of Nancy Drew " The Clue of the Broken Locket". ... >>

Other long-time Nancy Drew fans also believe that Norman Braley is the artist for the dustjacket for "The Clue of the Broken Locket." Well-known collector, James Keeline, has copies of correspondence between Grosset and Dunlap and the Stratemeyer Syndicate discussing the artwork for this book. The artist isn't named in any of the correspondence, but is described as being "he." This would eliminate all the female artists.

There is speculation among the long-time fans that Russell H. Tandy, for some reason, could not complete the dustjacket in time for the requests from the catalogue merchants for a photo for inclusion in the upcoming catalogues. Thus a new artist was hired, but Tandy definitely completed the four glossy internal illustrations found in this book.

This book was the first series book I ever found when I started to look for series books. This was in 1979 and I paid a whopping sum of $7.00 CAD plus postage for this first edition. I thought the book was so beautiful with a dustjacket and I wanted all the books with a dustjacket. At the time, I had no idea of what I was getting myself into, unaware of the various formats for various series.

This dustjacket artwork is now my least favourite of Nancy Drew because I found Tandy's paintings much more appealing that this one. Still, the book and its dustjacket hold a special place in my collection because it was the first one I acquired.


message 13: by J. Michael (new)

J. Michael | 130 comments William wrote: "Other long-time Nancy Drew fans also believe that Norman Braley is the artist for the dustjacket for "The Clue of the Broken Locket." Well-known collector, James Keeline, has copies of correspondence between Grosset and Dunlap and the Stratemeyer Syndicate discussing the artwork for this book. The artist isn't named in any of the correspondence, but is described as being "he." This would eliminate all the female artists."

Yes, James was part of the conversation when I first advanced my theory about Norman Braley back in 1999. I've kept all that correspondence, and it seems at the time that some people were doubtful about Braley's existence, believing that he might be an invention of Grosset & Dunlap or the Stratemeyer Syndicate. I pointed out that whether the name was a pseudonym or not, the dustjacket and frontispiece of "The Outdoor Girls in the Air", and the endpapers for G&D's reprints for the two Rex Cole books (which were used a decade later for the Jimmie Drury Series) were all signed, "N. Braley." I also noted that the illustrations for "The Bobbsey Twins on an Airplane Trip" were attributed to a Margaret Temple Braley, and wondered aloud what her connection to Norman might be. I'm not sure if that mystery was ever solved, but I would trust James Keeline's conclusion, if he indeed reached one. I've always found him to be a scrupulous and meticulous researcher.

And William, I too have a special fondness for "The Clue of the Broken Locket," despite the first dustjacket art. That was the first book I purchased on eBay after I joined in 1998, and all I knew when I bought it was that it was a thick edition with a dustjacket. (The listing did not have a picture of the book or jacket.) I paid $14.00 for it, and when it came, it was a first printing. The book was in excellent condition, the jacket not so much, but I was thrilled anyway. It was a huge improvement over the copy my aunt had sent me one summer when I was 11 ... I had read that one so often that the cloth was beginning to wear off the boards at the corners!


message 14: by William (new)

William Land (williamland) | 1253 comments Mod
What Michael wrote in response to Norman Braley tallies to what I know about this artist. James Keeline is a very careful researcher and his facts are always trustworthy. Fortunately, most people in the series collectors' community are trustworthy and share accurate information. There are a few exceptions, though, and these people must be avoided and not trusted.

I so enjoyed your tale about "The Clue of the Broken Locket," Michael! $14 USD was an excellent price for a first edition in 1998 even in the dustjacket isn't so great!


message 15: by Faye (new)

Faye Kisker | 408 comments This is such an interesting topic. Russell Tandy is my favorite illustrator for series books. But I also love the dust jacket for Broken Locket. I love the uniqueness of it and the watercolor look of it.
I will have to look up an example of Norman Braley's work. I know I have seen it. I have wondered if it could have been Thelma Gooch after seeing one of her illustrations, but if it were a man it couldn't have been. I always hoped James Keeline would publish a book of the correspondence he has researched. I have read some and it is so interesting.
I do love Pelagie Doan's illustration as well. I think they are beautiful. I have some of her books for children and the illustrations are so nice.
Two other illustrators I love that seem to only be on books for younger readers are Corinne Malvern and Margaret Gayer. Malvern did many Little Golden books as well as other books and greeting cards and I am sure there are more books as well. I think I have some. Margaret Gayer illustrated the Brownie Scout Books & Snow Valley is one of my favorite covers.


message 16: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 162 comments Lois Lenski also illustrated children's books. The earlier Betsy-Tacy books were illustrated by her.


message 17: by Peter (new)

Peter Clark | 89 comments Has anyone ever seen the works of Pierre Probst? The books I'm talking about are Caroline and her Friends. Though not series books and geared towards younger kids the illustrations are truly a joy to see. Once you meet Caroline's friends like Inky and Puff to name just 2. You will be charmed beyond belief. You will also laugh out loud at some of the fabulous illustrations.


message 18: by William (new)

William Land (williamland) | 1253 comments Mod
Faye wrote: << ... I always hoped James Keeline would publish a book of the correspondence he has researched. I have read some and it is so interesting. ...>>

James Keeline is planning to publish a SERIES BOOKS ENCYCLOPEDIA (not exact title) which will be an A-Z guide to series books.

During his Zoom presentation on April 28th, he mentioned that it should be ready "soon." I don't have an exact date or any other information, but I'm hoping it will be later this year or in 2021.


message 19: by William (new)

William Land (williamland) | 1253 comments Mod
Faye wrote: << ... I have wondered if it could have been Thelma Gooch after seeing one of her illustrations, but if it were a man it couldn't have been. ...>>

I love Thelma Gooch's illustrations for the Blythe Girls series. They are so very well done and distinctive. They are eye catching in their beauty!

Faye wrote: << ... I do love Pelagie Doan's illustration as well. I think they are beautiful. I have some of her books for children and the illustrations are so nice. ... >>

Pelagie Doane's illustrations for the Heidi books published by Grosset and Dunlap are so attractive.

Faye wrote: << ... Margaret Gayer illustrated the Brownie Scout Books & Snow Valley is one of my favorite covers.>>

I, too, enjoy the illustrations for the Brownie Scout books. The "Snow Valley" cover is gorgeous. I was very fortunate to get all six books with dustjackets in one e-Bay purchase several years ago.


message 20: by William (new)

William Land (williamland) | 1253 comments Mod
Peter wrote: "Has anyone ever seen the works of Pierre Probst? The books I'm talking about are Caroline and her Friends. Though not series books and geared towards younger kids the illustrations are truly a joy ..."

This artist is unfamiliar to me.


message 21: by Peter (new)

Peter Clark | 89 comments Another group of illustrations I have always found really detailed and attractive were the covers and especially the internal illustrations for The Dana Girls. Starting with #17 The Ghost in the Gallery to #27 The Secret of the Silver Dolphin. What I find curious is how this series had such superior illustrations over at the time The Hardy Boys and especially Nancy Drew. Don't get me wrong. I love the Dana Girls, but Nancy was the star of the Stratmeyer syndicate and in that period her internal pictures were just alright compared to the Danas. Anyone have any thoughts on this?


message 22: by Linda (new)

Linda (lindajoysingleton) | 8 comments I was given a glimpse of James Keeline’s series list and it will be very valuable when public. I still have a copy of the Girls Series Encyclopedia which is very good. I recently found 2 copies of the early version of the GSE—not as complete as final one—but still good to look up girl series titles/dates/authors/descriptions.

In fact—I don’t need to keep the 2 older ones (paper-sized and about an inch thick). If anyone wants one of these two copies, I prefer trades rather than checks so here’s my offer: I’ll mail it to you and pay postage if you buy one of my books as a gift to a child or school or library. It’s been a while since my last Curious Cat Spy Club book came out and my books could use a little promotion and love.

First 2 people to email me at ljscheer@yahoo.com and the GSE books are yours,


message 23: by Beverly (new)

Beverly | 1057 comments William wrote: "Peter wrote: "Has anyone ever seen the works of Pierre Probst? The books I'm talking about are Caroline and her Friends. Though not series books and geared towards younger kids the illustrations ar..."

O have not heard of these works.


message 24: by Beverly (new)

Beverly | 1057 comments Kathleen wrote: "Lois Lenski also illustrated children's books. The earlier Betsy-Tacy books were illustrated by her."

I love her books.


message 25: by Beverly (new)

Beverly | 1057 comments William wrote: "Lindsay wrote: >

I noticed that Judy was too tall on this cover, but I didn't think about the tree being small. Still, it's a lovely cover. The three young girls are drawn exceptionally well and t..."


I love the cover. Everything! I only thought about the dress going with red hair.


message 26: by Rebekah (new)

Rebekah (rebroxanna) | 631 comments Going by the price, I think that tree is at least half the size it should be.


message 27: by Faye (new)

Faye Kisker | 408 comments I would agree with your Rebekah. It was a lot of money for the 1940's, which probably didn't mean much to Roxie. I don't remember if Beverly did a price comparison to the year it was written and the most recent year in the price comparison tables. She often does and I love that.


message 28: by J. Michael (new)

J. Michael | 130 comments J. Michael wrote: "I also noted that the illustrations for "The Bobbsey Twins on an Airplane Trip" were attributed to a Margaret Temple Braley, and wondered aloud what her connection to Norman might be. I'm not sure if that mystery was ever solved ..."

Someone may have already found the answer to my question about the relationship between Norman Braley and Margaret Temple Braley, but if not ...

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/1...


message 29: by J. Michael (new)

J. Michael | 130 comments Peter wrote: "Another group of illustrations I have always found really detailed and attractive were the covers and especially the internal illustrations for The Dana Girls. Starting with #17 The Ghost in the Gallery to #27 The Secret of the Silver Dolphin. "

I agree completely with Peter's opinion of those Dana Girls covers and internal illustrations. The artist responsible was the prolific Gerald McCann (1916-1995), who was best known for his oil paintings of the Old West. Mr. McCann illustrated several books about historical figures aimed at juvenile readers, some of them published by Grosset & Dunlap, as well as comic books and magazine covers. His work on those 11 Dana Girls titles isn't often mentioned among his accomplishments, probably because (unlike his other juvenile output) they weren't signed.


message 30: by Peter (new)

Peter Clark | 89 comments Wow! J Michael thank you for the info! I have wondered about this for a long time!!!


message 31: by William (new)

William Land (williamland) | 1253 comments Mod
J. Michael wrote: "Peter wrote: "Another group of illustrations I have always found really detailed and attractive were the covers and especially the internal illustrations for The Dana Girls. Starting with #17 The G..."

I'm so glad to know about the artist for these Dana Girls novels. Like Peter and Michael, I, too, enjoy the artwork which appears on these books. The paintings and drawings are extremely well done.


message 32: by Faye (new)

Faye Kisker | 408 comments J. Michael wrote: "J. Michael wrote: "I also noted that the illustrations for "The Bobbsey Twins on an Airplane Trip" were attributed to a Margaret Temple Braley, and wondered aloud what her connection to Norman migh..."

That was excellent detective work, Michael! What a great resource that is. Thanks for telling us about it.


message 33: by J. Michael (new)

J. Michael | 130 comments Faye wrote: "That was excellent detective work, Michael! What a great resource that is. Thanks for telling us about it."

You're very welcome, Faye! I did a little more research on other juvenile series contributors after I found the information on the Braleys, and discovered the Find-a-Grave entries for Margaret Sutton Hunting and Pelagie Doane:

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/6...

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/9...

And then I looked up the Stratemeyer family. Oddly enough, Edna wasn't cross-referenced with Edward, Magdalene and Harriet, so I made the necessary changes to her listing and had her added to the family tree:

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/2...

I meant to leave a tribute to Margaret on the day I found her page, but didn't. I corrected that omission tonight after seeing that the Stratemeyers had hundreds of tributes on their page. I hope that Lindsay will approve.


message 34: by Faye (new)

Faye Kisker | 408 comments That was beautiful, Michael!


message 35: by Faye (new)

Faye Kisker | 408 comments What appropriate messages on the Stratemeyer tombstones.


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