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Movie Discussions > Alfred Hitchcock

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message 1: by W (new)

W | 355 comments He hardly made any bad movies.But one movie which often gets mentioned as his best is Vertigo.It was good,but not his best.Which ones are your favorites ?


message 2: by Michael (last edited Aug 07, 2020 05:57AM) (new)

Michael Richards (michaelc1) I'm a big fan. I've watched many of his films multiple times. They never get old. My favorites (in no particular order) are:

Rear Window
Shadow of a Doubt
North By Northwest
Notorious
Suspicion
Foreign Correspondent


message 3: by W (new)

W | 355 comments Same with me,watched each one multiple times and never get bored.For me,it is hard to pick his best film.


message 4: by David (new)

David Putnam (davidputnam) | 7 comments The one that scared the hell out of me as a kid was The Birds.

d.


message 5: by W (new)

W | 355 comments Me too.


message 6: by Emilie (new)

Emilie | 11 comments My top favorites are:

Vertigo
Psycho
Rear Window
North By Northwest
Notorious

I think the 1950s really was the man's golden age, but I've seen many of his movies, even as far back as the silent era. He was really great.

On a side note, I think I'm the only Hitchcock fan who likes Topaz. I recently watched it for the first time and thought it was a good, if very different, film for him.


message 7: by David (new)

David Putnam (davidputnam) | 7 comments Didn't he do 39 Steps? I enjoyed that one. I don't remember ever seeing Topaz
d.


message 8: by W (new)

W | 355 comments Topaz is among my least favourite Hitchcock films.
It's still watchable,but doesn't meet his high standards.
I'm watching Jamaica Inn on youtube and the beginning is not that great.


message 9: by Emilie (new)

Emilie | 11 comments Jamaica Inn is mostly meh. The 39 Steps is great though, as is another 1930s Hitchcock: Young and Innocent. I also love both versions of The Man who Knew Too Much.

For me, the Hitchcock movies I don't like are largely his later ones. I didn't like Marnie or Frenzy much (though both have a handful of brilliant moments), and I was bored to tears by Torn Curtain.


message 10: by W (new)

W | 355 comments Yes,Jamaica Inn seems like a rare Hitchcock meh.I enjoyed Marnie,Frenzy and Torn Curtain.
The Man Who Knew Too Much,the version witb James Stewart and Doris Day is entertaining.Haven't seen the other version.
Rope,a murder just for the thrill of it,is very good too.
Also enjoyed Strangers on a Train.


message 11: by W (new)

W | 355 comments Not to forget :
Dial M for Murder
Rear Window
Notorious
Spellbound
Lifeboat
Shadow of a Doubt


message 12: by Spencer (new)

Spencer Rich | 69 comments Shadow of a Doubt
Spellbound
Strangers On a Train
I Confess
Notorious
Rope
The Wrong Man
The Trouble with Harry

Of the super-popular ones, Rear Window is my favorite. I probably judge the early ones a little differently, but I like Jamaica Inn. Laughton is fantastic.


message 13: by W (new)

W | 355 comments Rebecca
To Catch a Thief


message 14: by Anthony (last edited Aug 08, 2020 09:26PM) (new)

Anthony McGill (anthonym) | 162 comments Emilie wrote: "My top favorites are:

Vertigo
Psycho
Rear Window
North By Northwest
Notorious

I think the 1950s really was the man's golden age, but I've seen many of his movies, even as far back as the silent e..."


Agree with the top 4 and the 1950s was definitely Hitch's golden age. Would probably squeeze "Shadow of a Doubt" (Hitch's favorite) into #5 but so many great and entertaining movies with most being worthy contenders.

Curious that I never see "Spellbound" discussed all that much. W & Spencer have it up there but I rarely see much comment about the film. Not in my top tier of favorite Hitch's but certainly worth a lot of discussion if only for the Salvador Dali dream sequence and Miklos Rozsa's monumental, Oscar winning music score where he introduced the unsettling sound of the Theremin to movie audiences. The only time they worked together and apparently Hitch wasn't keen on the music and according to Rozsa, he later heard that Hitch thought the music took away from his direction!
AH earned his third (in six years) directing nomination for this film.


message 15: by R (new)

R Pyle | 28 comments I've seen all the extant Hitchcock films, and my favorites are his early English ones before he came to America, especially "The 39 Steps", "Young and Innocent", "Blackmail", "The Lady Vanishes", and the silent "The Lodger". I've never really found "Vertigo" my cup of tea, but I appreciate it. Much prefer "North by Northwest". His 60's and 70's stuff just never really struck a chord in me. "Psycho" is very well filmed, but it never has been a film I need to go back to. Saw "The Birds" in the theater when it came out. I was fifteen. Perfect for a fifteen year old. "Frenzy" leaves me cold even now. Saw it last year. Would much rather watch Hitchcock's silents. Watched all of them again this past year. Really enjoyed the restored version of "The Farmer's Wife".

What I think is grand about the man is simply his directorial style. It's nearly perfection. Just watch the umbrella scene in "Foreign Correspondent" or Claude Rains in any scene in "Notorious", especially down in the wine cellar, or Norman Lloyd in the final scene of "Saboteur". Or, or, or...


message 16: by W (last edited Aug 09, 2020 09:23AM) (new)

W | 355 comments Or the shower scene in Psycho,or when Joseph Cotten chases his neice in Shadow of a Doubt.


message 17: by Spencer (new)

Spencer Rich | 69 comments Or the long shot in Notorious that goes down to Ingrid's wrist. But yeah, the whole film is full of great shots, as R mentioned.


message 18: by R (new)

R Pyle | 28 comments I must admit I'm as much interested in Hitch's influence on Maurice Elvey and vice versa.


message 19: by Anthony (new)

Anthony McGill (anthonym) | 162 comments R wrote: "I've seen all the extant Hitchcock films, and my favorites are his early English ones before he came to America, especially "The 39 Steps", "Young and Innocent", "Blackmail", "The Lady Vanishes", a..."

Umbrella scene in "Foreign Correspondent" - the wine cellar in "Notorious" - Norman Lloyd's departure from Statue of Liberty in "Saboteur - all great moments in cinema history!


message 20: by Erin (new)

Erin  | 118 comments Psycho & Vertigo

I also really like the tv show Alfred Hitchcock Presents


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