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The Four Loves
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Four Loves - August 2020 > 8. Favorite Quotes

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message 1: by John (new) - added it

John Seymour | 1922 comments Mod
8. Share your favorite quotes here. Why is this meaningful to you?


message 2: by Manuel (last edited Aug 02, 2020 01:30AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Manuel Alfonseca | 1572 comments Mod
This is my favorite quote from this book. In the chapter on Friendship, Lewis writes:

Otherwise we are arguing like a man who should say: "If there were an invisible cat in that chair, the chair would look empty; but the chair does look empty; therefore there is an invisible cat in it."

This is a very old fallacy, well-known from antiquity. As Lewis formulated it in a new paradoxical way, I have given it the name "The fallacy of the invisible cat." It has influenced me a lot, as proved by the fact that I have dedicated two posts in my blog to this fallacy:

https://populscience.blogspot.com/201...

https://populscience.blogspot.com/201...


message 3: by John (new) - added it

John Seymour | 1922 comments Mod
[L]anguage is not an infallible guide, but it contains, with all its defects, a good deal of stored insight and experience.

We ignore this insight at our peril, which we are, as a society, doing now in spades. I heard recently that CNN has started referring to "people with cervices" to refer to what have throughout time been referred to as women. Our society is going nuts.


Mariangel | 578 comments Our imitation of God in this life (...) must be an imitation of the God incarnate: our model is the Jesus, not only of Calvary, but of the workshop, the roads, the crowds, the clamorous demands and surly oppositions, the lack of all peace and privacy, the interruptions. For this, so strangely unlike anything we can attribute to the Divine life in itself, is apparently not only like, but is the Divine life operating under human conditions.


Mariangel | 578 comments Now it must be noticed that the natural loves make this blasphemous claim ("to become gods") not when they are in their worst, but when they are in their best, natural condition. (...) A faithful and self-sacrificing passion will speak to us with what seems the voice of God. Merely animal or frivolous lust will not (...). A man may act upon such feelings, but he cannot revere them

I agreed with him in this the previous times I read this book, but now I wonder if some people nowadays do revere them, and have actually made them the voice of God.


Mary Catelli | 54 comments I have seen, many times, people who insist that "love" is -- well, not even eros but simply carnal desire.


Manuel Alfonseca | 1572 comments Mod
Mary wrote: "I have seen, many times, people who insist that "love" is -- well, not even eros but simply carnal desire."

You can see this in the evolution of the meaning of words. For instance, Making love in English meant originally "wooing," or even simply "being pleasant to somebody." Today it means exclusively "performing the sexual act." I made the mistake of using the words in the old sense in one of my novels, and someone wrote in his review that there was explicit sex in my book.


Mariangel | 578 comments Where the sentiment of patriotism has been destroyed this can be done only by presenting every international conflict in a purely ethical light. If people will spend neither sweat and blood for “their country” they must be made to feel that they are spending them for justice, or civilization, or humanity. This is a step down, not up.


message 9: by Jill (new)

Jill A. | 710 comments "The proper aim of giving is to put the recipient in a state where he no longer needs our gift." (in Affection chapter)


message 10: by John (new) - added it

John Seymour | 1922 comments Mod
Manuel wrote: "Mary wrote: "I have seen, many times, people who insist that "love" is -- well, not even eros but simply carnal desire."

You can see this in the evolution of the meaning of words. For instance, Ma..."


LOL. Sorry, but that struck me as very funny. If someone thought that phrase was explicit they don't know what explicit is and they have lived a very, very sheltered life.


message 11: by Manuel (last edited Aug 10, 2020 03:29AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Manuel Alfonseca | 1572 comments Mod
John wrote: "LOL. Sorry, but that struck me as very funny. If someone thought that phrase was explicit they don't know what explicit is and they have lived a very, very sheltered life."

Just in case, I have changed in that book the term "making love" to "kissing" so that it cannot be mistaken for what I didn't intend.

To give this some Lewis content, Lewis says in "Studies in words" that words change meaning and can be misinterpreted by later readers. He gives many examples of classic English works where this has happened. In fact, when I started reading Shakespeare in the original versions, I practically had to learn a new language. And this is not just my experience: the books I had, were full of notes explaining to English readers the original meaning of many words.


message 12: by John (new) - added it

John Seymour | 1922 comments Mod
Manuel wrote: "John wrote: "LOL. Sorry, but that struck me as very funny. If someone thought that phrase was explicit they don't know what explicit is and they have lived a very, very sheltered life."

Just in ca..."


This is quite true. One area where this is a problem is scripture. For those Protestants who love their King James Bibles, or Catholics who insist that the Douey-Rheims is the only decent translation, a problem is that many words have shifted meaning and some have changed 180 degrees.


message 13: by Mariangel (last edited Aug 10, 2020 03:33PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Mariangel | 578 comments What I found annoying in reading the footnotes to Shakespeare is that the majority explained the meaning of (currently uncommon in English) Latin-origin words, which were the only ones I had already understood!


message 14: by John (new) - added it

John Seymour | 1922 comments Mod
Mariangel wrote: "What I found annoying in reading the footnotes to Shakespeare is that the majority explained the meaning of (currently uncommon in English) Latin-origin words, which were the only ones I had alread..."

LOL - that's funny, Mariangel, and a reflection of the education of modern Americans, I'm afraid.


message 15: by Jill (new)

Jill A. | 710 comments "The man who agrees with us that some question, little regarded by others, is of great importance, can be our Friend. He need not agree with us about the answer." (from Friendship chapter)
This respectful attitude seems to be widely lacking today.


Mariangel | 578 comments Friendship is unnecessary, like philosophy, like art, like the universe itself (for God did not need to create). It has no survival value; rather it is one of those things which give value to survival.


message 17: by Jill (new)

Jill A. | 710 comments "If we cannot 'practise the presence of God', it is something to practise the absence of God, to become increasingly aware of our unawareness." (From Agape chapter)


message 18: by Tania (new) - added it

Tania (tmartnez) | 105 comments All human beings pass away. Do not let your happiness depend on something you may lose. If love is to be a blessing, not a misery, it must be for the only Beloved who will never pass away-

Lewis recalls Saint Augustine's quote to explain better this chapter of Charity.


Manuel Alfonseca | 1572 comments Mod
Tania wrote: "All human beings pass away. Do not let your happiness depend on something you may lose. If love is to be a blessing, not a misery, it must be for the only Beloved who will never pass away..."

This reminds me of what St. Francis Borgia said when he saw the face of Empress Isabel, the wife of Emperor Charles V, disfigured by putrefaction after her death: "I'll never again serve a Lord that can die," and he proceeded (after several years) to be made a Jesuit, becoming in time the third General of the order, after Ignatius of Loyola and Diego Laínez.


message 20: by Tania (new) - added it

Tania (tmartnez) | 105 comments These both saints are completely correct


Mariangel | 578 comments It is no disparagement to a garden to say that it will not fence and weed itself, nor prune its own fruit trees, nor roll and cut its lawns. (...) It will remain a garden if someone does all these things to it. Its real glory is of a different kind. The very fact that it needs constant weeding and pruning bears witness to that glory. It teems with life. (...)
When God planted the garden of our nature and caused the flowering, fruiting loves to grow there, He set our will to “dress” them. Compared to them it is dry and cold. And unless His grace comes down, like the rain and the sunshine, we shall use this tool to little purpose.



Mariangel | 578 comments Let us consider first this supernatural Need-love of Himself, bestowed by Grace. (...) What the Grace gives is the full recognition, the sensible awareness, the complete acceptance-even, with certain reservations, the glad acceptance- of this Need. (...) Grace substitutes a full, childlike and delighted acceptance of our Need, a joy in total dependence.

This is St. Therese’s Little Way.


message 23: by John (new) - added it

John Seymour | 1922 comments Mod
Men who have real Friends are less easy to manage or "get at"; harder for good Authorities to correct or for bad Authorities to corrupt. Hence, if our masters, by force or by propaganda about "Togetherness" or by unobtrusively making privacy and unplanned leisure impossible, ever succeed in producing a world where all are companions and none are Friends, they will have removed certain dangers, and will also have taken from us what is almost our strongest safeguard against complete servitude.


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