Ultimate Popsugar Reading Challenge discussion

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2020 Weekly Checkins > Week 30: 7/17 – 7/23

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message 1: by Sara (new)

Sara | 1508 comments It has been another sweltering week here. I wish ice cream was a health food because the first thing I want to do after driving home from work in a hot car is eat a bowl of ice cream. Busy life combined with the heat has just made me so unmotivated to read. I have mostly been watching tv lately. I did spend a chunk of time over the weekend rearranging furniture in my house. I moved my bedroom downstairs and my old room has been converted into a teen lounge for my daughter. I think, after months of isolation at home, we both needed our own space ;)

Admin note:

August group read is coming up! The August book is The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society (which is an excellent book!) and discussion will be led by Lynn.

We are still looking for leaders for the newly selected 4th quarter books:
October - Daisy Jones & The Six
November - Where the Crawdads Sing
December - The Vanishing Half

If you are interested please DM me or Nadine.

On to the reading check-in!

I’m back in my reading rut. I have only read 4 books in the entire month of July so far. That’s fine, but it is definitely well below my average (and most of them were from the first half of the month).

Finished:
The Switch by Beth O’Leary – I thought this was a sweet book. Different from her first book, The Flatshare, which I really loved. I got an audiobook ARC from Netgalley using their new app. There were some glitches in the app which may have affected my enjoyment of the book a little. It was well narrated. It’s perfect for anyone who likes book set in small English countryside villages (a la Jenny Colgan).

Currently reading:
Meh…I’m kinda wavering on some books. We’ll see if I get hooked on any.

I'm pretty much stalled out on my reading challenge. My motivation to read is low, and mostly I want to reread books (which I usually don't count for a challenge). I may have to revise my plan for this year so I can make some progress.

Question of the week:

I found this article this week which is really interesting: Words we think we know, but can't pronounce: the curse of the avid reader

"...Mispronunciation is often the downfall of people who read widely as children and form the incorrect pronunciation in their mind before actually hearing the word said aloud."

Has this ever happened to you? Do you remember any specific words that you mispronounced in your head?


I'm pretty good at pronunciation in general (thanks phonics!), but I know this has happened to me many times.

The words that come to mind are:

Awry - in my head I always want to say "awe-ree" and I have to make a concerted effort to switch over to "uh-rye". I actually thought they were two different words. In hindsight it makes no sense, but I had no issues using the correct pronunciation verbally, but if I came across the word in a book my mind would veer to the wrong pronunciation.

Waistcoat - I only learned the correct pronunciation of this one (wes-cut) because I heard it in the audio version of a familiar book (I think it was part of the Outlander series).

I know there have been others, but these are the only ones I can think of at the moment.


message 2: by Katy (new)

Katy M | 748 comments I'm stilling working on The Brothers York: An English Tragedy, my book published in 2020.

QOTW: Me, too, with awry. I read it for years, knowing the meaning from context. I also knew it from conversation and knew what it meant, but I think I thought (if I gave any thought to it at all) that it was spelled arye. I think I was in my 20s by the time I realized it was the same word.

You just taught me something with waistcoat. Which I will continue to pronounce as a compound word. It doesn't come up much in conversation after all.


message 3: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (patchworkbunny) | 1192 comments I don't think many people in the UK would know what you were talking about if you said wescut, I think maybe that's an old fashioned way of saying it, which would make sense in Outlander. I've only ever heard people call it a waist coat.


message 4: by Sara (new)

Sara | 1508 comments Ellie wrote: "I don't think many people in the UK would know what you were talking about if you said wescut, I think maybe that's an old fashioned way of saying it, which would make sense in Outlander. I've only..."

That's good to know! I wondered if it was just a British pronuciation, but it sounds like it's just old fashioned.


message 5: by Laura (last edited Jul 23, 2020 05:30AM) (new)

Laura | 165 comments Beautiful weather in Santa Fe! The high today is supposed to be about 80. All our windows are open, and we're enjoying the sun and fresh air. I'm still trying to get organized in our new house. My craft/sewing area is in complete disarray and there's nothing on the walls, but it feels more and more like home each day.

Challenge Progress: 49/50

Completed:
Undercover Bromance: Cute... but not special in any way. Braden was pretty great, but Liv was a hard character to like; she's just so angry, and I never really felt like I understood why. Yes, she had issues with her father, but that just doesn't seem to account for it. Also, the sexual assault plot line seemed to take over, so much so that the romance felt like an afterthought. ★★★ (A book with sunglasses on the cover)

Well Met: "I didn’t choose the wench life. The wench life chose me." Fun little rom-com. I enjoyed the Ren Fair setting, and both Emily and Simon were both interesting characters with complicated backstories. I'm looking forward to the sequel. ★★★★ (A book involving a summer romance)

One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression Is Destroying Our Democracy: Nice primer on the issue of voter suppression. Includes up-to-date information about current efforts to deny voters' rights as well as a comprehensive history of voter suppression. ★★★★

Something in the Water: I just didn't care. Mark and Erin are both pretty unlikable, and Erin was so boring I kept forgetting her name. The twists weren't twisty; the thrills weren't thrilling. An interesting concept and set up without an enjoyable payoff. ★★ (A book with a body of water or pool on the cover)

Girl at War: While I appreciated the vignettes of Ana's experiences as a child during the Croatian War of Independence, I never felt fully immersed in the story. The story was being told to me instead of letting me experience it along with her. A little bit flat. ★★★ (A book set in a country starting with C - Croatia)

The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo: I wasn't really expecting much, but this memoir was much better than expected. Schumer's humor is a bit too crass for me at times, but I admire her activism (gun violence, body positivity) and found many of her stories surprisingly relatable. ★★★★ (A book with an item you'd find at the beach in the title)

Currently Reading:
An Excess Male (A book set in a country starting with C - China)
That Summer (A book with summer in the title)
Home Before Dark (A scary book you'd read around a campfire)
Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic (A book with an LGBTQ+ protagonist)
Conjure Women
Start by Believing: Larry Nassar's Crimes, the Institutions that Enabled Him, and the Brave Women Who Stopped a Monster
When I Was You (A book by an author with flora or fauna in their name - Minka Kent)

QOTW: I can't think of any words like that for myself. (Except maybe for gif. I just can't accept that it's pronounced with a soft g when the g stands for "graphics.") But I remember when my son Rhys was in high school, and he was so disappointed to learn the correct pronunciation of "epitome." He thought it sounded so weak and small.


message 6: by Nadine in NY (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 6425 comments Mod
Ellie wrote: "I don't think many people in the UK would know what you were talking about if you said wescut, I think maybe that's an old fashioned way of saying it, which would make sense in Outlander. I've only..."


I didn't know that!!! I thought all you Brits said "wescut" hahaha

Do you guys even talk about a waist coat, ever? It's not a term that comes up in the US, I only see it in historical fiction. I'm honestly not quite sure what it is. Is it a vest? A suit jacket? I look it up now and then, learn what it is, and then promptly forget again.


message 7: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (patchworkbunny) | 1192 comments The ATY readathon has made me put down my Switch a bit more this week. I need to get organised with my challenges though as it's getting difficult to squeeze my random reads into the remaining prompts.

Finished:
Malorie the sequel to Bird Box which I enjoyed a lot more than I was expecting. Though in both books I have felt the endings were a bit convenient... I am using for the vision impairment prompt, even though technically they can see, the situation impairs their vision.

Again Again for ATY (related to the arts). This is playing with the multiverse theory, that there are different versions of conversations playing out...but also the second part it shows how one event happens differently to create a completely different story, which was so much sweeter than the first. I liked it a lot more for what it did in the second half. The first half was very Lockhart but not that special.

Victor LaValle's Destroyer for a book featuring one of the seven deadly sins (wrath). This was a random comic I got from a racism themed Humble Bundle, but I really enjoyed it. It's a BLM Frankenstein story.

Currently reading A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor for a character in their 20s and I've finally managed to get some audiobook time in and am back to listening to The Body: A Guide for Occupants. I wasn't paying attention to my Audible subscription and now I have 32 credits (!) so I need to go splurge on audiobooks.

QOTW:
Only yesterday I discovered Laos is pronounced like the low in allow, not lay-os. I mean I'm assuming a BBC documentary were saying it right, I guess I've only ever read it before.


message 8: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (patchworkbunny) | 1192 comments Nadine wrote: "Do you guys even talk about a waist coat, ever? It's not a term that comes up in the US, I only see it in historical fiction. I'm honestly not quite sure what it is. Is it a vest? A suit jacket? ..."

I think it's what you would call a vest? We would definitely call it a waistcoat if discussing the item of formal clothing (eg. for a wedding). They seem to have become a bit more fashionable again amongst hipsters in recent years.


message 9: by Samantha (new)

Samantha (bookstasamm) | 176 comments Happy Thursday! It's been so humid here that over the weekend I didn't even want to leave the house (sadly I have to during the week for work). I was able to finish three books this week.

Finished:
Mexican Gothic - I was so excited about this book. It was one of my most anticipated reads this year. Sadly, I didn't love it though. The beginning moved really slowly, and I found the twist so odd. I wanted a true Gothic horror story, but this was not horror at all in my mind. The writing was very descriptive though and did transport me to High Place. 3 stars

The Wives - this was a crazy ride! I didn't see any of the twists coming which makes a good thriller in my mind. I used it for prompt #17 - a medical thriller. This might be a stretch for this prompt, but I saw the book was on a Goodreads list for medical thrillers so I'm using it. 4 stars

Horrorstör - I really love Grady Hendrix's dark humor and the way he mixes it with horror. This is my second book of his that I've read. I didn't love it as much as The Southern Book Club's Guide to Slaying Vampires, but I still enjoyed it. 4 stars

Challenge Progress:
Regular Challenge - 26/40
Advanced Challenge - 8/10
Total - 34/50

Currently Reading:
All the Stars and Teeth - still reading this for my Facebook book club read along.

Cilka's Journey - I'm using this for prompt #21 - a book published the month of your birthday.

The Beauty in Breaking: A Memoir - this is my BOTM book club book this month. I just started it so no opinion yet.

The Wife Who Knew Too Much - I just started this ARC yesterday so I'm not far into it. It's intriguing though.

QOTW - I found this article this week which is really interesting: Words we think we know, but can't pronounce: the curse of the avid reader

"...Mispronunciation is often the downfall of people who read widely as children and form the incorrect pronunciation in their mind before actually hearing the word said aloud."

Has this ever happened to you? Do you remember any specific words that you mispronounced in your head?


There is one word that I'm never sure how to pronounce when I read it, but I can't think what it is off the top of my head. If I remember I'll come back and edit my post!


message 10: by Nadine in NY (last edited Jul 23, 2020 06:20AM) (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 6425 comments Mod
Happy Thursday!!  Honestly the weeks are running together for me.  It's hot.  I'm working from home.  We have blueberries and raspberries.  My kids are home.  My dogs are cute.  There's road construction behind my house (I think they are paving?). The end.  

I've been reading some GREAT books, though!  This week I finished five books.  One of them was even for this Challenge!  So I am now 39/50.

Citizen: An American Lyric by Claudia Rankine - this was just gorgeous. 5 stars

The Devotion of Suspect X by Keigo Higashino- this mystery was a bit of a psychological thriller, with that very spare writing that seems common in Japanese literature.  This was my "book set in Japan."

House of Light poems by Mary Oliver- I love Oliver’s poems, but this wasn't my favorite of hers.

The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett- You guys! I loved this book SO much!  I can’t even come up with words to say why, but it was one of the best books I’ve read.  5 stars.  

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander - to be honest I didn’t read the entire book, it was grueling, and my library loan expired before I read all of it, but I think I got the gist.


QoTW

Yes!  This definitely happens to me.  The first occurrence is when I was a little kid, reading a Three Investigators mystery (The Mystery of the Talking Skull), and I started telling my mom all about this "SOH-crates" and my mom started laughing and explained that his name is pronounced "SAH-cruh-tees" - ooops.  (I think they called him SO-crates in "Bill & Ted," too.  I sympathized.)

Honestly, it happens to me so often that no other occurrences stick in my mind, it's just a common thing for me.   From the comments to that article, I've been saying these wrong:
Synecdoche  (I've been pronouncing that to rhyme with anecdote)

When I was in college I became a bit of a pedant with this stuff, and I read There is No Zoo in Zoology, and Other Beastly Mispronunciations: An Opinionated Guide for the Well-Spoken and I learned a lot and now I wince every time someone says "zoo-ology" now.  But everyone says it like that!!  Transient and flaccid are mispronounced 100% of the time, as well, to the point that the mispronunciation is now listed as correct.  I guess language evolves and I need to let it go. 

I've also heard audiobook readers mispronounce words, so it's not just us!!  A few times, I would stop and think "what? is THAT how you pronounce that???" and I'd look it up, and ... nope.  I had it right, the reader was saying it wrong. 
 
Of course I can't remember any examples except for Bruce Springsteen's memoir Born to Run (and I highly recommend this audiobook - I'm not even a Springsteen fan and I loved it), and it's possible that the way he said it was the way everyone in his town said it (but unlikely - I grew up in NJ not too far from where Bruce grew up, and ... that's not how WE said it).  It was the name of the local Catholic school, "St Rose de Lima"  ... the "i" in Lima is an "ee" sound.  But that's not how Bruce says it.  Still, that's a local place name, and I did not grow up in Freehold, so who knows.


message 11: by Sarah (new)

Sarah (sezziy) | 872 comments Sara wrote: "Ellie wrote: "I don't think many people in the UK would know what you were talking about if you said wescut, I think maybe that's an old fashioned way of saying it, which would make sense in Outlan..."

I'm not sure where Ellie's from, but maybe it's a North/South divide? My Dad has a strong Yorkshire accent and he'd say "wescut" but I have a more neutral accent so I'd say waistcoat (unless I was making fun of my Dad, which happens all the time!)


message 12: by Ellie (last edited Jul 23, 2020 06:33AM) (new)

Ellie (patchworkbunny) | 1192 comments Sarah wrote: "I'm not sure where Ellie's from, but maybe it's a North/South divide? ..."

I grew up in the Scottish Borders, my parents are from the West Midlands and now I live on the south coast of England. So lots of accents and no wescuts! I can see how it might be shortened in some accents though, a lot of older people in Hampshire only seem to pronounce half of their words. You just need a bit of context to understand what people are talking about sometimes...


message 13: by Chandie (new)

Chandie (chandies) | 264 comments Slow reading week.

Book with a made-up language

Dune by Frank Herbert. I’m not the biggest sci fi fan and I know this is a classic, but it was very meh for me. The ending felt very abrupt and the villain was so cartoonishly bad.

I am, however, looking forward to the movie. Hello Oscar Isaacs and Jason Momoa.

doesn’t fit a prompt
What You Wish For by Katherine Center. Cute contemporary romance/women’s fiction. Enjoyed it a lot.

QOTW:

Okay, I teach English and when we are doing grammar (my least favorite, admittedly), I point out to my middle and high school kids that English is actually ridiculous language and for every rule there are 18 exceptions. So, when people have English as a second language or are learning the language, especially as an adult, we need to give them grace. English stole so much from other languages and sometimes we were like “we’re just going to keep it as is” and sometimes we were like “nah, going to change it a bit but keep the spelling” and it’s a mess.

My SIL (who is Puerto Rican) and I were talking about the messiness of English and she told me something I had never thought about: spelling bees are an English-speaking country thing because most other largely follow actual rules (instead of what I like to call the guidelines of English), spelling bees aren’t a thing.


message 14: by Heather (new)

Heather (heatherbowman) | 721 comments My reading hasn’t slowed down since finishing the challenge. I usually get into a rut, but not this year. There are a lot of books I’ve been looking forward to reading from the library now that it’s open again, so I think that’s part of what’s keeping me excited about reading. We can check out 5 books at a time. I have 5 and a list of the next 5 I want to checkout.

Finished
Star-Crossed by Minnie Darke. I loved this book! It’s a romantic comedy centered around astrology. It’s whimsical and adorable. I think this is the perfect pandemic book. I felt calm while reading it and forgot that any troubles existed. Because astrology is the glue of this novel ... This is the opinion of a Cancer 🦀

How to Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi. This is such a powerful book. I attended the free online talk he gave this week too.

Reading
The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern. Sadly, I think I’m going to DNF this one. I adored The Night Circus, but I’m just not connecting with this one at all.

The Fifth Season by NK Jemesin

Goldilocks by Laura Lam

QOTW
I distinctly remember mispronouncing "quintessential" when I was a pretentious little middle schooler. A classmate corrected me in the middle of my presentation. That taught me a lesson! I also had a lively discussion with some friends in college about how to say "phallic" (in relation to the staging of a play).


message 15: by Sarah (new)

Sarah (sezziy) | 872 comments Hi everyone. I've been back from furlough about three weeks but the hotel industry is just losing money like crazy at the moment so we've been told to expect redundancies in the coming weeks. I've started to look for other work just in case I'm one of the unlucky ones.

This week I finished Every Heart a Doorway which felt way too short. I needed more information, more story. I guess I'll have to read the sequels.

I also finished So This is Love. Cinderella has always been my least favourite princess so I didn't have high hopes going in, but I actually liked some of the changes the author made to make the prince less of a cardboard character

Currently reading: Artificial Condition. I like Murderbot's point of view but the story hasn't grabbed me yet.

QOTW: I can't remember where I first read the word "bourgeoisie" but I definitely did not pronounce it right in my head


message 16: by Jennifer W (new)

Jennifer W | 732 comments Hi all! I'm on vacation until August 2! And I need it! I was getting very frazzled over everything at work, and that's not me. I don't have much planned for the time off, maybe some housework if it's cool enough (which I don't think it's supposed to be). Hopefully do some reading and vegging out is my main plans.

I actually finished a book this week! On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous, which I think I'll use for a bildungsroman. I'll get back into Hunchback and maybe pick up something else.

QOTW: Hehe, I think I've told this story before, but I made a fool of myself as a senior in high school reading a passage out loud about a crime and the person was indicted. Which I repeatedly pronounced "in-dick-ted". Honestly, I still have to correct myself with that one.

I have a younger cousin, when he was maybe junior high age, we all were on vacation together. He was scrolling through the hotel TV and wound up asking his parents what "arrow-teeka" was- erotica!


message 17: by Jennifer W (new)

Jennifer W | 732 comments Oh, and Sara, ice cream is absolutely health food at this point! It only becomes unhealthy when you add toppings, so make sure you pick something with good stuff already mixed in and you're fine! ;)


message 18: by Alex (new)

Alex of Yoe (alexandraofyoe) | 159 comments Ice cream is totally a health food imho. I could eat it any day, any weather. My grandmother is that way too. I think I get it from her. We're bad influences on each other. XD

Finished 23/50

The Way of Kings for "book with a made up language". Wow. I don't think I ever finished a 1000 page book so fast. This was a TRIP. Wonderful fantasy, hugely recommend. I'm trying to figure out if I can work the next couple books into the prompts I have left! It's been two days and I'm still thinking about it!

Currently Reading

The Wired Soul: Finding Spiritual Balance in a Hyperconnected Age for "book about or involving social media". It's ok so far. Looks like it'll be an easy read. I'm mostly interested in the psychology of it.

On Living Simply: The Golden Voice of John Chrysostom for "book featuring one of the seven deadly sins". Sadly, it looks like I'm running out of pages in this fantastic book. It's pure gold. By next week, though, it'll be over. :(

The Wilderness Journal: 365 Days with the Philokalia for "book with a title that caught your attention". Another week. Another 7 pages read.

QotW

ALL. THE. TIME. One of my earliest memories is of my mom making fun of how I'd say words I'd only read but never heard! I confused "martial" and "marital" once and only in the past few months learned that "albeit" is pronounced "all be it" and not "all bite". My favourite mispronunciation is my grandfather trying to pronounce "piranha" as "PEER-en-haw" instead of "pee-RAW-nuh". Also, a couple of years ago, we stumbled across a pronunciation that divided our entire town! Schmale Road was a prominent street where we lived, but my office pronounced it "shmall-ee" and my husband's coworkers insisted it was "shmail". Google maps calls it "shmall-uh". No one has any idea what it actually should be.

ENGLISH IS AN AWFUL LANGUAGE.


message 19: by Katy (new)

Katy M | 748 comments Jennifer W wrote: "I have a younger cousin, when he was maybe junior high age, we all were on vacation together. He was scrolling through the hotel TV and wound up asking his parents what "arrow-teeka" was- erotica!.."

When I was about 12 I asked my mom and sister what im-po-tent meant. I can't even remember if they corrected my pronunciation because they freaked out asking where I had seen it. Then I don't think I helped my case any when my mom finally explained it and I said "so like frigid for a woman." Again with the "where are you getting this stuff???"


message 20: by Christine (last edited Jul 23, 2020 07:56AM) (new)

Christine McCann | 490 comments It's dangerously hot and humid here, we tried to go on a socially-distanced trip and it didn't work out, and it's just been a stressful week.

BUT! I did finish a book.

BUT BUT! I also started a new one so I'm still sort of reading six books plus listening to Murderbot at bedtime. :D

Finished

Lagoon - interesting setup, but kind of a plotless mess. It did make me want to seek out books by African authors depicting normal everyday life - I really liked the insight into Lagos Okorafor brought as an American of Nigerian descent who visited often.

Currently Reading
(I'll leave out things I've kind of suspended till I get through these others)

My friends' fantasy-set-in-sort-of-Mycenaean-Greece, final title TBD.

Devolution: A Firsthand Account of the Rainier Sasquatch Massacre - I adored The Zombie Survival Guide: Complete Protection from the Living Dead and World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War, and this is delivering too. It's all based on "found documents" and news reports and such. In the audiobook, Kai Ryssdal and Terri Gross play themselves, which is delightful! At 46% in, this is more setting up a "People (and hubris) are the real monsters" situation, but I don't mind tropes if they're executed skillfully. And Mostar is a great character - given the hints and that she's read by Mira Furlan, I can guess how she knows so much about surviving, and that's a really interesting take. I also do really like poor unsure Kate and depressed Dan and how their relationship is affected by the survival situation.

QOTW

I had SO much trouble with "Ague." I tried to take cues from words like plague and league and came up with "Ayg," but no, it's "AY-gyoo." Thanks English.

Also my eyes must have skipped entirely over the third syllable in "Reverberate" and I was pronouncing it as "REV-er-brate." It was pretty embarrassing when I said that in front of an acoustical engineering student. 😬

But at least taking Shakespeare classes prepared me to pronounce Hermione correctly when I picked up Harry Potter!


message 21: by Stacey (last edited Jul 23, 2020 08:01AM) (new)

Stacey | 404 comments Hi Everyone, Happy Thursday!

I managed to read another 6 books this week and am really happy with all of my progress lately (especially since I slumped hard in June)! I think the BookoplAthon and all of my buddy reads lately have really helped me get back on track by reminding me that I can make progress quickly if I make it a priority! It's made me more motivated to zoom through some prompts! :)

Current Progress

PS: 43/50 | PSS: 13/20 | HP: 50/56 | ATY: 44/52 | GR: 79/100

Read This Week

The Titan's Curse (Percy Jackson and the Olympians #3) by Rick Riordan ⭐️⭐️⭐️ I liked that this one seemed a bit more mature and that it had higher stakes! It was missing the banter that I loved in the first book but here's hoping that it will be back in the next book!
Not used for any prompts

The Battle of the Labyrinth (Percy Jackson and the Olympians #4) by Rick Riordan ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️I liked this one much more than books 2 & 3 in the series and I'm glad that the series is growing up a bit! I enjoyed that the plot of this one was higher stakes and paced a little bit more quickly. Looking forward to finding out what happens in the next one!
Used for: PSS - 14. A Book that takes place during the summer before high school or college (summer before high school in this case)

It's Not Summer Without You (Summer #2) by Jenny Han ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ I liked this a lot more than the first in the series! There are definitely parts and aspects of the story that are more serious/deep but there's also some moments where you're reminded that Belly is pretty selfish and inconsiderate which take away from the enjoyment a bit.
Used for: PSS - 15. A Book that takes place in a Beach Town

The Last Olympian (Percy Jackson and the Olympians #5) by Rick Riordan ⭐️⭐️⭐️ This one was high action but kinda low on actual plot in my opinion. Also, after waiting for 5 books, I was pretty disappointed at how the romance was handled in this one!
Used for: HP - 51. Read a book with a moon on the cover (it's a bit hard to see until you zoom in but there's a moon on the top left of the cover!) The Last Olympian (Percy Jackson and the Olympians, #5) by Rick Riordan

Things You Save in a Fire by Katherine Center ⭐️⭐️⭐️ (3.5 Stars) I appreciated that this went way beyond the romance and that it had plenty of depth but that abrupt ending really took away from my enjoyment; the extra cheeese really took me out of the story and made me dock half a star.
Used for: PSS - 9. A Book with a release date in June, July or August of any year (Aug. 2019 in this case)

10 Blind Dates by Ashley Elston ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ This was entertaining, cute and sweet! I really liked the premise and enjoyed reading about all the relationship/family dynamics included in here! On the other hand, this was suuper predictable; from the moment a certain someone was introduced I knew exactly how this book would wrap up. I also wish that this had have featured adults instead of teens because not only would the story be way less limited based on the premise but I found some of Sophie's decisions/thought processes at times so frustrating to read.
Used for: PSS - 4. A Book about a vacation (it takes place during a Christmas vacation/break at the grandparent's house)

Currently Reading

Nothing yet, I'll decide on what I'm picking up next this evening! :)

QotW

I know for sure that this has happened to me and that I've had to mentally correct some of my assumed pronunciations before, I just really can't pinpoint any of the words at the moment. XD


message 22: by Katy (new)

Katy M | 748 comments Christine wrote: "II had SO much trouble with "Ague." I tried to take cues from words like plague and league and came up with "Ayg," but no, it's "AY-gyoo." Thanks English...."

I'm a little stubborn. I refuse to pronounce it any way but rhyming with plague. Luckily for me, it doesn't come up a lot in real life.


message 23: by Drakeryn (new)

Drakeryn | 708 comments Ice cream is definitely a health food imoooo

Also this week I busted out of my reading slump I've had all month so that's cool.

Finished reading (24/50):

Minor Mage (author with fauna in her name [T. Kingfisher]) - Quest story with an armadillo sidekick, what more could you ask for?

ib - Instant Bullet 1
ib - Instant Bullet 2
ib - Instant Bullet 3
ib - Instant Bullet 4
ib - Instant Bullet 5 (set in Japan) - Short manga series about a group of outcasts who gain supernatural powers (power of time, power of life, power of sympathy, etc.) and have to decide whether to use their newfound powers to save the world or destroy it. I'm probably making it sound generic but I really like some of the character work/themes - if the world has only wronged you, why would you want to save it?

Currently reading:

The Light Brigade (three-word title, passes Bechdel test) - Military sci-fi. Liking this a lot, although I'm 80% of the way through (and it's a standalone) and I'm getting worried about whether the plot can wrap up properly in that little space.

chaos;child (set in Japan, about journalists) - Finished the common route. Everything from chapter 9 onwards was amazing. Now I've got to do the side routes, which honestly are kind of a slog (it's in choose-your-own adventure format, and to get to each side route you have to go back to the beginning and pick specific choices throughout).


QotW: For a long time, I mentally pronounced "lich" as "like" (I guess because of the word lichen). When I first heard my friends saying it correctly, I thought they were intentionally mispronouncing it as a joke.


message 24: by Drakeryn (new)

Drakeryn | 708 comments Christine wrote: "I had SO much trouble with "Ague." I tried to take cues from words like plague and league and came up with "Ayg," but no, it's "AY-gyoo." Thanks English."

wait really? I always thought it was "agh" (rhymes with "ugh").

I'm learning so much in this topic haha


message 25: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (patchworkbunny) | 1192 comments I am just glad that most the words I don't know how to pronounce are not words I ever need to say!

I had never made the connection between "all be it" and albeit being the same word. Like others I would read it as al-bite but I would say all be it in a sentence. Total agreement, English is crazy.


message 26: by Christine (new)

Christine McCann | 490 comments Drakeryn wrote: "Christine wrote: "I had SO much trouble with "Ague." I tried to take cues from words like plague and league and came up with "Ayg," but no, it's "AY-gyoo." Thanks English."

wait really? I always t..."


It is a very stupid word, and I'm with Katy - in my head I usually still say it like "plague."


message 27: by Johanne (new)

Johanne *the biblionaut* | 1301 comments Lots here I didn't know :D
I've got to say, English is my second language and I read a lot of English books, so lots of cases of reading the word incorrect. And there's also lots of accents and dialects in the English language.


message 28: by Cendaquenta (new)

Cendaquenta | 694 comments Oh, it's Thursday again?
Speaking of ice cream, I'm currently tucking into a bowl - vanilla, accompanied by strawberries and chocolate Swiss roll.

No news, still lockdown. A blackbird fledgling has been visiting the garden, it's very cute. The tail hasn't grown in yet so it is incredibly round and slightly unbalanced - keeps tripping over and having to splay out its wings to catch itself. ❤
Oh, and found a black clock beetle in the living room the other day. Caught it in a glass and threw it outdoors, but not before I had named it Stanley. The pandemic is definitely bringing out my Crazy Animal Lady side...

So, books.
Completed this week:

Semiosis - I liked this, it reminded me a bit of Ursula le Guin somehow. And may have planted a seed of paranoia (ha, pun) about plants. They're watching... they're thinking...

March: Book One - Read in honour of the passing of John Lewis, RIP. I wish I had bought an omnibus edition, this first volume does cover some important stuff but didn't get very far into Lewis's life.

Dominicana - This one's a bit of a "hmm" for me. It was... good? Competent? I liked reading it, but I don't get what the fuss was about, why it's up for the Women's Prize for Fiction and such. I've read similar stories done much better.
(But then, I've felt that way about a lot of the Women's Prize nominees this year...)

The Lost Man - Enjoyed this. Interesting mystery with a lot of twists, and I loved the Australian outback setting. I need to read more Aussie books. Used for Popsugar prompt #10, "recommended by favourite blog/vlog/etc." My fav Booktuber, Lianne (channel name literarydiversions) recommends it a lot. I don't think it quite lived up to the hype she's given it, but I wasn't disappointed either.

Currently reading The Sealed Letter. About to finish, actually. It's alright. Probably best I've read from Emma Donoghue, but I've been pretty "meh" on her other books so I guess that isn't saying much.

QOTW: Oh boy. I have learned most of my vocabulary from books and never, ever pronounced anything right on the first try.

Specific words... well, I recall having a lot of trouble with "fuchsia". The correct pronounciation is of course "few-sha". You might be able to guess at tiny-Cenda's very incorrect attempt. 😳


message 29: by Brittany (new)

Brittany | 183 comments Happy Thursday all!

I've been trying to focus on positive things lately and this week has been pretty good. I got to video chat with my parents last night as my dad accidentally started a call on a Whatsapp group chat set up between my parents and my husband and I. He was very startled to have it happen but we all enjoyed it and are planning to do it more often. I had a pretty good reading week by mainly reading some shorter stuff. I don't usually read too many novellas or graphic novels but it was a nice change this week which makes me feel more productive.

So to start, I read Magic for Liars which I'm using for the book by a Trans or Non-Binary author. I thought this was a good read but maybe not a great read. I think it's probably because I enjoy magical worlds and would have loved to dive even further into the magic and world building. For the actual story, it was exactly the right amount for the plotline and I don't think it would have made sense to have more focus on it. I just really enjoyed the magic bits that were there and would have loved to have seen more of it.

Following that I read Binti and I really enjoyed this one. I'm realizing that I'm actually rather a fan of space based stories. I had no idea what the story was really about before I started it and I enjoyed Binti's struggle with her connection to her heritage and how it conflicted with her desire to educate herself. I was happily surprised by the main conflict and how original the 'villains' were and by the resolution. I'm planning on picking up the other two stories in this series. I used this for the book published the month of your birthday prompt.

And finally, with the passing of John Lewis, I started to read his graphic novels March: Book One and March: Book Two. I'm just waiting for the third one to come back in so I can finish the series. I thought this was a really great medium for a historic memoir that covers such an important time in history. Especially, as it makes it engaging for teens. The artwork was so well done and I'm really loving the pacing and storyline so far.

QOTW: Hyperbole! You could have knocked me over when I found out it wasn't pronounced as Hyper-bowl. I've got to be honest, it was not that long ago that I found this out (thanks Hyperbole and a Half).


message 30: by Ali (new)

Ali | 75 comments Sara wrote: "Waistcoat - I only learned the correct pronunciation of this one (wes-cut) because I heard it in the audio version of a familiar book (I think it was part of the Outlander series)"

You absolutely should not discount that the audiobook narrator might not know how to pronounce words properly either!! I've certainly heard a few clangers over the years... Same as you, if you think you know how something is pronounced, you don't look it up.

Wes-cut would definitely be a new one on me unless it was a slightly unusual way of writing a Yorkshire-type accent


message 31: by Megan (new)

Megan | 325 comments I finished two books, but neither fit any of my open prompts. So, I'm at 23/40 and 9/10 for this challenge for the fourth week in a row, and am now at 80/100 for my overall Goodreads Reading Challenge. I may just pick a prompt and find a book to get some momentum going again with this challenge. I haven't had as much overlap with other challenges as I've had in the past. I'm making progress on all of them, but feel like I've stalled a bit on this one.

Finished:
* Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson; and,
* The Sandman: The Dream Hunters by Neil Gaiman and illustrated by Yoshitaka Amano.

Currently Reading:
* Winter Counts by David Heska Wanbli Weiden; and,
* My Vanishing Country by Bakari Sellers.

QotW:

I found this article this week which is really interesting: Words we think we know, but can't pronounce: the curse of the avid reader

"...Mispronunciation is often the downfall of people who read widely as children and form the incorrect pronunciation in their mind before actually hearing the word said aloud."

Has this ever happened to you? Do you remember any specific words that you mispronounced in your head?


I'm sure this has happened to me a lot, but the first word that came to mind when I read this was "epitome."


message 32: by Ashley (new)

Ashley | 159 comments Mornin'!

The weather here has been so weird. All I know is my tomato plant is not enjoying it. It's not warm enough or sunny enough for it. It's kind of droopy and still no tomatoes! I gave it some plant food yesterday and trimmed some of the lower leaves, so I'm hoping that helps.

Finished:

Mexican Gothic - I really really enjoyed this one. My friend and I read it at the same time, so it was fun to chat about it while working our ways through it. I've heard a lot of people call the start of the book slow, I don't think it is. It feels like world building to me. You really get to know the people and the place they are, which makes the story that much richer. I didn't find it particularly scary ( I don't find most horror/scary books, TV or movies scary). I did think it was creepy in parts. I highly recommend it.

Only Mostly Devastated - I wanted a fun palate cleanser and this was and wasn't that. It is a YA queer retelling of Grease and it was super sweet and emotional. Even though it was YA I felt that the two leads (who are teens) communicated better than a lot of the adults in romances I read.

Currently Reading:

Beloved - I'm listening to this on audio and the book itself/the writing is amazing and she has a great voice but it's so quiet. It's kind of heard to hear. I'll for sure pick-up more Morrison books in the future but I'll pick up the actual book.

Columbine - I'm reading this on my phone during my lunch break and it's so informative. I'm not too far into it but I have already learned thing about the event and the shooters that I didn't know. It's also really well written.

Normal People - I picked this up from the library last week and am going to start reading it tonight. I'm excited to dig in.


message 33: by Lauren (last edited Jul 23, 2020 09:57AM) (new)

Lauren Oertel | 759 comments I'm ready for this busy week to come to an end tomorrow! Nine hours of Zoom meetings yesterday really wiped me out. But, after six months of unemployment, I'm always grateful to have a job now.

I'm at 49/50 for the regular challenge and 10/20 for the summer challenge.

This week I listened to Queenie which was decent... I'm glad things started getting better for the MC toward the end. 3 stars

I read The End of Policing for a book club, and thought there were many good points made in the book, but I recently learned that the author has been a big jerk to the leaders of the group that I've volunteered with for years. We have been working on police policy and have had various successes, but I guess this author thinks our work hasn't been good enough and he's been trashing the wonderful Black woman who is part of the leadership team of our organization and another group working on reimagining justice. I'm really disappointed that he's acting this way and it's going to be really awkward talking about his book with him since he'll be at our book club discussion. I didn't rate this because of the author's actions, even though I liked the content of the book.

I listened to The Injustice Never Leaves You: Anti-Mexican Violence in Texas which is a really important book! I met the author last year and I'm glad I finally got to this. It's so insulting how Texas Rangers are still celebrated, even though they were a white supremacist terrorist organization. 5 stars

I read The Secret Women for a "beach read" and it was enjoyable, although I wanted a little more on some of the stories. 4 stars

I also finished The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories after meeting the author recently. Some of the stories were pretty disturbing, but he's a great writer and incredibly smart. 4 stars

I'm currently listening to My Dark Vanessa and reading Running in print.

QOTW: I think I was also confused about a few words mentioned above here. Epitome, indicted, etc. I've also struggled with how "rifled" and "riffled" are different, in terms of going through things and/or flipping through pages of a book. When I hear it pronounced both ways in audiobooks it confuses me, but I finally looked it up to find they're technically different words.


message 34: by Nadine in NY (last edited Jul 23, 2020 09:02AM) (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 6425 comments Mod
Alex wrote: "Also, a couple of years ago, we stumbled across a pronunciation that divided our entire town! Schmale Road was a prominent street where we lived, but my office pronounced it "shmall-ee" and my husband's coworkers insisted it was "shmail". Google maps calls it "shmall-uh". No one has any idea what it actually should be...."


hahah Listening to GoogleMaps try to pronounce local place names is always fun. We've got a Kinne Rd here (that's KIN-nee) and Google says (KINE). Also, place names, like "Seneca Rd" or "Cayuga Lake" or "Skaneatleles" or "Chittenango" ... forget it. Seneca ("SENN-eh-kuh") seems so innocuous, but GoogleMaps says "suh-NEE-kuh" and never fails to crack us up.


message 35: by Nadine in NY (last edited Jul 23, 2020 09:10AM) (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 6425 comments Mod
Christine wrote: "... Lagoon - interesting setup, but kind of a plotless mess. It did make me want to seek out books by African authors depicting normal everyday life - I really liked the insight into Lagos Okorafor brought as an American of Nigerian descent who visited often. ..."


Okorafor is basically American, so I don't know how much weight to put on her insight. She wrote Lagoon as an angry reaction to depictions in the movie "District 9" (and honestly I don't remember any Nigerians in District 9 - that was set in Johannesburg ... were there Nigerians in the movie too?) which is cool and all, but Nigerians were not thrilled with her book. They say that's not what Lagos is like at all.



My hold on the audiobook of Devolution: A Firsthand Account of the Rainier Sasquatch Massacre just came in so I'm excited to start that! (as soon as I finish what I'm listening to now: Crimson Lake)


And, I'm never sure how to say "ague" so I just don't say it. In my head, it's "auughyoo"


message 36: by Sarah (new)

Sarah (sezziy) | 872 comments Nadine wrote: "Alex wrote: "Also, a couple of years ago, we stumbled across a pronunciation that divided our entire town! Schmale Road was a prominent street where we lived, but my office pronounced it "shmall-ee..."

When I lived in New Zealand, the sat-nav could never get the place names right. The "Wh" sound really confused it. Whakatane (pronounced kinda like Fa-Kah-Tah-Ne) became Wack-a-tane


message 37: by Sheri (new)

Sheri | 769 comments Hi everyone,

Been dealing with a migraine all week, so forgot it was Thursday for a while.

This week I finished:

Untamed - I liked this better than I expected overall. I still think the language was overly flowery for me, but there were some good moments where she gave advice I really felt.

Phoenix and Ashes - I had started a really depressing book and i just had to put it down and do a re-read.

Spinning Silver - wasn't ready to dive back into serious stuff, so did a re-read of this, still love it

Wave - I read this for read harder's book about a natural disaster. It's about a woman who survived the 2004 Sri Lankan tsunami, but lost her parents, husband and both her sons. It was pretty crushing and even with it being pretty short, I had to take a break partway through. Even then I kinda rushed through the end just to get through it.

Currently Reading:

To Be Taught, If Fortunate - need a bit of a break again, my next two books are also pretty heavy but I need to get them read before they expire.

Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights- doing audio book, it's just ok for me. I really like stories about djinn usually, but this one isn't really drawing me in much. Maybe it just jumps around between characters too much. Also there's a lot of talk about sex, but it's not a sexy book at all so it's weird. I have no problem with sex in books, but this doesn't really seem to serve a purpose except to be like "djinn like sex but weird mortal sex isn't as good as theirs". Hopefully can finish it soon. It'll be my book with 20 in the title. I really didn't like that prompt, haha. I'm not a big mystery fan so reading one of those wasn't super appealing to me. Really NOTHING i googled looked interesting, so this was kind of the best of a lackluster lot for me.

on deck are How to Be an Antiracist and Exit West

QOTW: I have a lot, haha. I remember figuring how ingenue was pronounced from a Rasputina skit, in my head it was in-jen- you. Also soliloquy, supercilious (I still won't use that one speaking, I have heard it a couple times and i just can't wrap my tongue around it). Colonel too, I mean where does the r sound even come from?


message 38: by Nadine in NY (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 6425 comments Mod
Cendaquenta wrote: "Specific words... well, I recall having a lot of trouble with "fuchsia". The correct pronounciation is of course "few-sha". You might be able to guess at tiny-Cenda's very incorrect attempt...."


"fuck-see-uh" is the only way I can remember how to SPELL that word. I pronounce it just fine, other wise hahah! but I always want to spell it "fuschia"


message 39: by Brittany (new)

Brittany | 183 comments The QOTW also reminded me of my old GPS system which always said the abbreviation of expressway (EXPWY) as 'exp-wee' rather than saying the actual word. It always amused me as a rather big thing to overlook by the makers of the device.


message 40: by Heather (new)

Heather (eveejoystar) | 59 comments Finished:
-Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides
-When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon
-The Yellow House by Sarah M

Currently reading:
-All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

I've had this book for 4 weeks. I'm not invested in it at all.


message 41: by Heather (new)

Heather (eveejoystar) | 59 comments Sarah M Broom was what that was supposed to say.


message 42: by Lynn (new)

Lynn (book_music_lvr) | 3574 comments Mod
Chandie wrote: "My SIL (who is Puerto Rican) and I were talking about the messiness of English and she told me something I had never thought about: spelling bees are an English-speaking country thing because most other largely follow actual rules (instead of what I like to call the guidelines of English), spelling bees aren’t a thing."

Oh, my goodness! I had never considered this, but it makes sense!


message 43: by Lynn (new)

Lynn (book_music_lvr) | 3574 comments Mod
Katy wrote: "Jennifer W wrote: "I have a younger cousin, when he was maybe junior high age, we all were on vacation together.

When I was about 12 I asked my mom and sister what im-po-tent meant. I can't even remember if they corrected my pronunciation because they freaked out asking where I had seen it. Then I don't think I helped my case any when my mom finally explained it and I said "so like frigid for a woman." Again with the "where are you getting this stuff???""


Oh, my! I am so glad I wasn't your mother! I would have been laughing too hard to answer! ;)


message 44: by Sara (new)

Sara | 1508 comments Jennifer W wrote: "Oh, and Sara, ice cream is absolutely health food at this point! It only becomes unhealthy when you add toppings, so make sure you pick something with good stuff already mixed in and you're fine! ;)"

I like the way you think!


message 45: by Chandie (new)

Chandie (chandies) | 264 comments Brittany wrote: "The QOTW also reminded me of my old GPS system which always said the abbreviation of expressway (EXPWY) as 'exp-wee' rather than saying the actual word. It always amused me as a rather big thing to..."

I drove my niece to a camp at Baylor University years ago and the GPS kept calling Waco, "Whacko".

"Take the exit for, Whacko, Texas".

That's what we still call it.


message 46: by Lynn (new)

Lynn (book_music_lvr) | 3574 comments Mod
Cendaquenta wrote: "Oh, it's Thursday again?
Speaking of ice cream, I'm currently tucking into a bowl - vanilla, accompanied by strawberries and chocolate Swiss roll.

Specific words... well, I recall having a lot of trouble with "fuchsia". The correct pronounciation is of course "few-sha". You might be able to guess at tiny-Cenda's very incorrect attempt. 😳"


Oh, my! That is too funny!

And your Crazy Animal Lady side is adorable! :)


message 47: by Doni (new)

Doni | 254 comments Finished: The First Rule of Punk enjoyable, but not very memorable.

Started: The Secret Life of the American Musical: How Broadway Shows Are Built

QotW: This happens to me ALL the time. (Maybe moreso when I was younger than now.) The word that comes immediately to mind is commingling. I know how to pronounce it, but didn't recognize it in print. I would have thought it would be spelled co-mingling!


message 48: by Jennifer W (new)

Jennifer W | 732 comments Nadine wrote: "Alex wrote: "Also, a couple of years ago, we stumbled across a pronunciation that divided our entire town! Schmale Road was a prominent street where we lived, but my office pronounced it "shmall-ee..."

Oh yeah, Upstate NY is just something else with place names. But Seneca isn't that bad! I guess I'll have to let people know I've moved to Suh Nee Kuh county!


message 49: by Cendaquenta (new)

Cendaquenta | 694 comments Chandie wrote: "I drove my niece to a camp at Baylor University years ago and the GPS kept calling Waco, "Whacko".

"Take the exit for, Whacko, Texas".

That's what we still call it."


... Huh, today I learned it's not Whacko.


message 50: by Kenya (new)

Kenya Starflight | 668 comments Happy Thursday, y’all.

Been a rough week. My mom fell and broke her wrist on Friday, and had to wait until Tuesday to go in for surgery to get a metal plate put in. She's been in a LOT of pain, and I've been doing my best to be a set of hands for her wherever I can. It was rough not being able to be in the hospital with her during surgery -- due to the pandemic they're not letting anyone unnecessary into the hospitals, and no visitors.

Books read this week:

Dave Barry's Book of Bad Songs -- Just a light silly read in between thicker books. I actually like quite a few of the songs in this collection, but Barry’s still funny, and boy are there some stinkers in here as well.

A Closed and Common Orbit-- Next in the “Wayfarers” series. I think this is rapidly becoming my favorite sci-fi series of all time. I love Sidra, Pepper, and Owl!

Shambling Towards Hiroshima -- An interesting novella in which, during WW2, the US military happens on a strange alternative to the atomic bombs -- giant Godzilla-like monsters. Both a nostalgic look at classic monster movies and a heartbreaking look at the arms race and its affects on the world.

Big Mushy Happy Lump -- Comic collection. I think Sara Andersen may be one of my new favorite cartoonists - I relate so hard to her comics.

DNF:

The Extraordinaries -- Maybe starting your book off with a chapter of a bad fanfic isn’t the greatest way to start. I pushed through that anyhow, only to be met with a thoroughly unlikable main character. Yes, writers, it’s possible to make your character thoroughly unlikable even if he’s LGBTQ...

Currently Reading:

Four Past Midnight
Alexandria
Record of a Spaceborn Few

QOTW:

All. The Freaking. Time. This was REALLY bad for me as a kid, because I was a voracious reader but believed every letter in every word had to be pronounced. This led to me pronouncing both Ls in words like "yellow," and adding a B to the end of letters like "dumb" and "lamb." To this day I still occasionally slip an L into "could" and "would."

And yes, I still stumble over words I've read a lot but rarely say aloud, like "poignant."


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