MCMLS Mitchell Fiction Book Club discussion

35 views
General > General Questions & Comments (not about the book)

Comments Showing 1-49 of 49 (49 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

Librarian Molly | 219 comments Mod
Have a general question about Goodreads? Want to tell us about your new puppy? This is the place.


message 2: by Katie (new)

Katie | 59 comments I miss seeing everyone! Thanks for this interim meeting format Molly!


Librarian Molly | 219 comments Mod
My pleasure, Katie. I hope this will work well for us until we can meet again. Don't forget to comment in the "Favorite Books" topic to enter the drawing for a free copy of our next book!


message 4: by Michelle (new)

Michelle Ostis | 238 comments I have to confess to a Literary Silver Lining during distancing—& as my husband works in Savannah, it’s been almost total. Aside from an allowed visit, because of my pure isolation, with brand new grandson Ozias (& 3 year old granddaughter Xanthe & mothers Lianna & Haley), my time has been completely my own. The bonus has been that with my 3 book clubs not meeting, I’ve had time to reach onto my shelves for whatever might tickle my fancy. Fun to make even an infinitesimal inroad into those bookcases overflowing with “someday” titles...


message 5: by Kent (new)

Kent  R (kentr33d) | 116 comments I help me be able to ponder over you questions. I'm on the border of Walker in Montgomery county, so I don't have to travel as far to get to a book club :)


message 6: by Kent (new)

Kent  R (kentr33d) | 116 comments I'm going to participate in the July book selection, The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek, seems like I missed out on the gun shoe one for the good daughter.


message 7: by Maxine (new)

Maxine | 145 comments Loved : The book woman of troublesome creek.

Some of the themes are so relevant today. The prejudice towards the Blues, the laws discriminating against them, the possible rape and no accountability, the friendship and bond between Cussy Mary and Angeline and the patrons on her route.

It was wonderful when Angeline took Cussy’s hand and said that basically there was no difference between them.
It was also so telling as Cussy did her route how many friendships she built up despite the prejudice against Blues.

Her father was the bird that went into the coal mines so the whites knew it was okay for them.



So many poignant scenes: Jackson’s goodness and love for Cussy, their marriage, the prejudice and disruption of that ,
The jealously and meanest of Cussy’s co workers, the love and care Cussy had for her patrons, her job and books.


marriage, her father’s death, their murder of Pastor Frazier and burial.


message 8: by Katie (new)

Katie | 59 comments You summed up my feelings about this book perfectly, Maxine.

The prejudice of the (our) community is so succinctly stated. The reminder that each of us is a being due respect as people reacted to and were confused by how to treat Cussy Mary when she took the medicine and became 'white'.
The ugliness and jealousy that exists in every community/coworking situation on display when their marriage is denounced.
The joy of seeing people who lived away from town and perhaps were themselves 'other' accepting and embracing Cussy Mary for who she truly was - a giving person - was heartwarming.


message 9: by Lorraine (new)

Lorraine Dickie | 90 comments I also loved the book. I enjoyed the way the author described all the characters. I’m all about characterization and want to emotionally feel what they are like, good or bad. I certainly felt many different emotions while reading this book. Cussy Mary was such a special woman and when she felt hurt and discriminated against, I felt for her. And I would get angry at whoever was hurting her. The author did such a good job of drawing me into the story. I had never heard of the Fugates ( the blue people of Kentucky) and checked them out on the internet and learned something new. For all the prejudice and disrespect she endured, she also had those patrons that really cared for her. After she started taking the medication and turned white, one of her customers, Mr. Taft said to her “I miss seeing my Bonny Picasso”. Picasso’s painting of the pretty blue lady that he saw in a magazine. “You remind me of her. Your fine color. My woman always said God saved the best color for His home.” He pointed to a patch of blue sky. “Guess He mush have had Himself a little left over”. I swear that brought tears to my eyes. And sadness and anger that that type of discrimination existed and still does. Good timing on the subject matter.


message 10: by Barbara (new)

Barbara | 67 comments I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. I had never heard of the blue people, also never heard of the book women, so I found this informative, as well as an entertaining story.


message 11: by Retta (new)

Retta Brandon | 141 comments Kim Richardson's writing was captivating by her use of the oral language of the Kentucky mountain folk vernacular. Though this folksy Old English language perhaps appeared naive in its messaging the author gave us real characters who were ostracized and marginalized in their community's coded language. Each of you Good Read contributors gave deep insights to how words shape and can be destructive to individuals who perhaps do not look like us. Kim Richardson's writing provoked emotional reactions throughout the story but she also gave us hope with cathartic release too.


message 12: by Kent (new)

Kent  R (kentr33d) | 116 comments It does help to give previews on the next book.😊


message 13: by Barbara (new)

Barbara | 67 comments I have read about a book called Year of Wonders by Geraldine Brooks. Apparently it is about a village in England that social distanced during the Black Death and the consequences of taking such a step. Has anyone on here read the book and, if so, is it worth reading?


message 14: by Michelle (new)

Michelle Ostis | 238 comments I’ve found all of Geraldine Brooks’ books enjoyable reading, so I’d say do go ahead, Barbara. This book club read her People of the Book a few years back. And March was such an interesting conceit, telling the tale of what the Little Women’s father March was up to during the war while Marmee and the girls were back at home. Sorry I can’t speak to specifics on this one, though; did read it, but age and lack of sleep ensure my brain remains a sieve.


message 15: by Retta (new)

Retta Brandon | 141 comments My favorite book was from our book club group by Michael Booth, The Almost Nearly Perfect People-Behind the Myth of the Scandinavian Utopia. Somehow this book has a parallels about Scandinavian countries which includes Norway , Sweden, Denmark Finland, and Iceland which are different in their tribe culture much like the Kentucky mountain folk which lived in various mountain regions separated by physical geography. Michael Booth takes a more humorous approach at examining the
similarities and differences of the Scandinavians people while Kim Richardson does have many humorous exchanges in her mountain folk characters. This book is in our library collection and is an entertaining read.


message 16: by Katie (last edited Jul 04, 2020 12:38PM) (new)

Katie | 59 comments Retta wrote: "My favorite book was from our book club group by Michael Booth, The Almost Nearly Perfect People-Behind the Myth of the Scandinavian Utopia. Somehow this book has a parallels about Scandinavian cou..."

Retta wrote: "My favorite book was from our book club group by Michael Booth, The Almost Nearly Perfect People-Behind the Myth of the Scandinavian Utopia. Somehow this book has a parallels about Scandinavian cou..."

Retta wrote: "My favorite book was from our book club group by Michael Booth, The Almost Nearly Perfect People-Behind the Myth of the Scandinavian Utopia. Somehow this book has a parallels about Scandinavian cou..."

Barbara wrote: "I have read about a book called Year of Wonders by Geraldine Brooks. Apparently it is about a village in England that social distanced during the Black Death and the consequences of taking such a s..."

Retta wrote: "My favorite book was from our book club group by Michael Booth, The Almost Nearly Perfect People-Behind the Myth of the Scandinavian Utopia. Somehow this book has a parallels about Scandinavian cou..."

Barbara wrote: "I have read about a book called Year of Wonders by Geraldine Brooks. Apparently it is about a village in England that social distanced during the Black Death and the consequences of taking such a s..."

Kent wrote: "It does help to give previews on the next book.😊"
Hi Barbara, Year of Wonders is one of my favorite books, along with another of Geraldine Brooks books - 'March'. I was considering re-reading it because it can be compared to our current times. I read it maybe 19 years ago when it first came out. (Katie) I'm not sure why I can't post on the feed with my name - but
here we are!


message 17: by Kent (new)

Kent  R (kentr33d) | 116 comments I got a borrowed copy of Gods of jade and Shadow, but I can extend the borrowing beyond October 2nd and haven't found any other free place to borrow the book for the rest of October. still looking...


message 18: by Librarian Molly (new)

Librarian Molly | 219 comments Mod
Kent, I found a website where you can read the book for free. It's not associated with the library, so read at your own risk, but here it is-->http://lovefreenovels.com/MostPopular...


message 19: by Kent (new)

Kent  R (kentr33d) | 116 comments Molly, I found a good price on the paperback for Gods of Jade and Shadow. I wasn't seeing favorable prices at first and then today I managed to find some.


message 20: by Barbara (new)

Barbara | 67 comments Each October we read the Gulf Coast Reads selection. This year Gulf Coast Reads has selected three possible books and has asked for people to vote which one they want to read, the deadline for voting is May 21. The three possible books are:
The House on the Cerulean Sea by TJ Klune
They Called Us Enemy by George Takei
Transcendent Kingdom by Yaa Gyasi
To vote, go to the website shown below. On the website are descriptions of the above three books.
http://www.gulfcoastreads.org/


message 21: by Michele (new)

Michele (mlbose) | 134 comments What is the June book selection? Sorry if this has already been announced but I can’t seem to find the information. Thanks.


message 22: by Michelle (new)

Michelle Ostis | 238 comments it’s V. E. Schwab’s The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue—and there should be a copy of the book waiting for you at Mitchell Library.


message 23: by Michelle (new)

Michelle Ostis | 238 comments (We were notified of the above by email.)


message 24: by Michelle (new)

Michelle Ostis | 238 comments Or did you really mean to ask about July’s selection?


message 25: by Michele (new)

Michele (mlbose) | 134 comments Thanks, Michelle. I don’t remember getting an email but I’ll double check. Maybe I just overlooked it or completely forgot I even read it, ha.


message 26: by Michelle (new)

Michelle Ostis | 238 comments Late for me to be telling everyone this, but on PBS right this minute, with another show following at 9, is a documentary about folks living along the Sea of Okhotsk. Interesting for those of us who were imagining life in that area of Russia as we read our mystery.


message 27: by Michelle (new)

Michelle Ostis | 238 comments SO SORRY! Not PBS, but the Smithsonian Channel. (1118). It’s a series called Russia’s Wild Sea (specifically, the Sea of Okhotsk that figured in our book Disappearing Earth). Showing tonight at 9 and also tonight (actually tomorrow) at 12 am. Midnight episode is about the reindeer herders, among other things.


message 28: by Michelle (new)

Michelle Ostis | 238 comments Happen to be working at South bookshop and found an extra copy of Christina Baker Kline’s Orphan Train, in case anyone wants to read something else of hers. (Haven’t read it myself…)


message 29: by Librarian Trev (new)

Librarian Trev (librariantrevor) | 159 comments Mod
Ok, so I know you guys just did a classic, "Rebecca", a few months back, but I was thinking about doing "The Awakening" by Kate Chopin for September's book. It's one of my favorites and I've been looking for a good excuse to re-read it. How would y'all feel about that? Have you read it already? Would you rather do something more current?


message 30: by Barbara (new)

Barbara | 67 comments I have not read this book so would be happy to read it.


message 31: by Katie (new)

Katie | 59 comments I have not read this book and look forward to new reads.


message 32: by Kent (new)

Kent  R (kentr33d) | 116 comments Not sure about next month


message 33: by Michelle (new)

Michelle Ostis | 238 comments Sounds good. It’s your choice; knock yourself out!


message 34: by Betty (new)

Betty Casey | 69 comments Sounds okay to me.


message 35: by Retta (new)

Retta Brandon | 141 comments Trevor
I am interested in reading this book and thanks for your recommendation.


message 36: by Sue (new)

Sue Green I've not read it yet either. Obviously, you highly recommend it so it sounds like a great selection for September.


message 37: by Librarian Trev (new)

Librarian Trev (librariantrevor) | 159 comments Mod
Alrighty! Ordered copies of it this morning. Thanks for the feedback everyone!


message 38: by Kent (new)

Kent  R (kentr33d) | 116 comments Copies of what? Us the July book


message 39: by Kent (new)

Kent  R (kentr33d) | 116 comments Okay what is it July selection and the September selection???


message 40: by Librarian Trev (new)

Librarian Trev (librariantrevor) | 159 comments Mod
The July selection is "The Exiles" by Christina Baker Kline. The August selection is "The Starless Sea" by Erin Morgenstern (just started it, it's weird). And, the September selection is "The Awakening" by Kate Chopin, although I haven't put September's selection up on the library calendar yet.


message 41: by Kent (new)

Kent  R (kentr33d) | 116 comments I remember reading " the starless sea". It was good.


message 42: by Librarian Trev (new)

Librarian Trev (librariantrevor) | 159 comments Mod
I'm going to work on getting next month's book out today, so be watching out for that e-mail! : )


message 43: by Michele (new)

Michele (mlbose) | 134 comments Hi Trev, could you please double check that I’m on the email list. I’ve not received any emails the past couple months but I’ve noticed others have mentioned getting them. Thanks!


message 44: by Librarian Trev (last edited Jul 08, 2021 01:17PM) (new)

Librarian Trev (librariantrevor) | 159 comments Mod
Hey, Michele. Sorry about that. If you just e-mail me from your preferred e-mail address I'll double check that you're on the mailing list. My e-mail is trevor.taylor@countylibrary.org. Thanks!


message 45: by Michele (new)

Michele (mlbose) | 134 comments Thanks!


message 46: by Kent (new)

Kent  R (kentr33d) | 116 comments I wonder with Facebook being disabled, What We'll express your bookshelf will do?


message 47: by Barbara (new)

Barbara | 67 comments This is for those of you who like to listen to books on CD.
I volunteer at the South Branch Friends of the Library book store. Yesterday we received a donation of hundreds of books on CD, they are being sold for 1, 2 or 3 dollars each.


message 48: by Barbara (new)

Barbara | 67 comments Spanish thriller writer Carmen Mola (whose books have been translated into English and ten other languages) has won a prize of a million euros for 'her' writing - but all is not as it seemed:

https://www.cnn.com/2021/10/17/europe...


message 49: by Librarian Trev (new)

Librarian Trev (librariantrevor) | 159 comments Mod
Can't say I've read any of "her" stuff, but that's quite interesting!


back to top