The Dresden Files Read-Along discussion

Changes (The Dresden Files, #12)
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Book 12: CHANGES (Spoilers Allowed)

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Berkley Publishing Group (berkleypub) | 37 comments Mod
Long ago, Susan Rodriguez and Harry were lovers, until the vampiric Red Court came between them. Now she’s back, with a shocking revelation. Let's talk CHANGES! Spoilers through SKIN GAME are permissible, so new readers beware.


Melissa Meitle | 1 comments Chaper 1 theory: Mac is litteraly counting his words because he swam against the current of time and is trying to control the ripples. He needs Harry to be able to repeat every word he has ever said verbatim.


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Steven Spicer (terriertribe) | 199 comments Melissa wrote: "Chaper 1 theory: Mac is litteraly counting his words because he swam against the current of time and is trying to control the ripples. He needs Harry to be able to repeat every word he has ever said..."

Good luck with that. Mac's outburst beginning on page 6 (Kindle) seems to have smacked Harry up side the head. I'd almost believe Harry could repeat Mac's other speeches, but ... "I looked at him, shocked. He'd ... used grammar." That was from simply getting a whole sentence out of Mac, and that tells me that Harry may have a hard time keeping up with what Mac says next.

By the way, is that a thing now? Mac's a time traveller?


Caryl Huffstetler | 156 comments Steven wrote: "Melissa wrote: "Chaper 1 theory: Mac is litteraly counting his words because he swam against the current of time and is trying to control the ripples. He needs Harry to be able to repeat every word..."
Not in canon just a theory bouncing around fan pages.


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Steven Spicer (terriertribe) | 199 comments Caryl wrote: "Not in canon just a theory bouncing around fan pages...."

Oh, I knew it wasn't canon, I just don't get out much.


Dawn (dawntm) | 20 comments When Susan told Harry about their daughter and that she had kept Maggie’s existence from him, Harry told her that although he would put aside for now, he would never forget and that there would be a reckoning. I have always wondered if he then deliberately used Susan as a weapon against Martin when he silently communicated to Susan in the tower at Chichinitza, asking her to think about who knew about Maggie. Was that the reckoning? Part of me says, No, Harry is not that vindictive against those he cares about. The other part reasons that Harry would do anything to save Maggie and that logically, Susan was half dead anyway.


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Yasmin Mazur | 196 comments Harry does weaponises his friends sometimes. I think that scene was a bad and worse choice for him - either he sacrifice Susan, or Maggie dies, and Susan did make it clear she's willing to die for her daughter, so he's not doing anything she'd object to.
When he kills her he specifically tells her to think of Maggie, so Susan is not resisting.
It would have been a shitty move any other time and place, but the lack of better options is extenuatimg circumstances.


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Steven Spicer (terriertribe) | 199 comments Dawn wrote: "I have always wondered if he then deliberately used Susan as a weapon against Martin ..."

Harry thinks Martin wanted him there, possibly for just that reason. Martin was willing to kill anybody, but ultimately he was also willing to die himself. He revealed his true motivations (not exactly a Snape moment, eh?) during the soulgaze with Harry just before Susan ripped out Martin's throat and turned.

Martin was in deep, deep cover, he was the only one who knew, and as he told Harry long ago (citation?) he was willing to do anything to damage the Red Court.

I don't think Harry has/had any particular reckoning in mind. Certainly he continues to blame himself for Susan's death long after the fact.


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Yasmin Mazur | 196 comments Thoughts about the Red King - he's a blood junkie, right? So unreliable, and he has to go - Ariana thought so, what if the Black Council thinks so too?
All those that came to help at the last moment, they may still be Black Council.
We don't know who the 12 members of the Gray Council are, except Mecoy and Vadderung, and not Listen To Winds because he was sick at the time - but the other 10 can still include 1 or more infected by the Adversary.


Paulum Mortis | 93 comments Dawn wrote: "I have always wondered if he then deliberately used Susan as a weapon against Martin […] at Chichinitza"

Whether this is true or not, I cannot say. However it is precisely the type of thing Harry himself will think in his darker moments. Even should it have been entirely untrue, there is enough ambiguity in the situation for doubt.

Next time he faces Polonius Lartessa…


Paulum Mortis | 93 comments JUMP THREAD Caryl wrote: "I'm just so glad I Wasn't a fan of Butcher's until just before Peace Talks was already about to be published. I can't imagine the angst and the wait for Ghost Story after Changes. I'll be experiencing those emotions as we wait for the follow up to Battle Ground."

It wasn’t that bad really. In a lot of ways CHANGES is the big budget “end” to the story. Harry has a mission with everything on the line. He pulls out all of the stops, gathers every ally and every weapon available, and charges off into the highest stakes game of his life.

And he wins.

Saves the girl. Kills the bad guy. Accomplishes the mission. Even had he failed at least it wouldn’t have been because he held back any of his strength!

I dunno about any of you guys but that is precisely how I hope Book #3 of the Apocalyptic Trilogy is going to go down.


Caryl Huffstetler | 156 comments I suspect you are correct. I feel Harry will have lost everyone he loves except, perhaps, Maggie and that his death/sacrifice will secure the future of humanity. Why? Because JB is very protective of 'his' character and universe and the only way to ensure an 'end' to the story is kill the main character once and for all and make us glad it happened that way. There are a couple alternatives that would take Harry out of the 'real' world but I don't think they are as likely because if Harry survives BAT someone will always want just one more Dresden book.


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Wordwizard (wordwizardw) | 107 comments Caryl wrote: "I suspect you are correct. I feel Harry will have lost everyone he loves except, perhaps, Maggie and that his death/sacrifice will secure the future of humanity. Why? Because JB is very protective of 'his' character and universe and the only way to ensure an 'end' to the story is kill the main character once and for all and make us glad it happened that way. There are a couple alternatives that would take Harry out of the 'real' world but I don't think they are as likely because if Harry survives BAT someone will always want just one more Dresden book."

But JB also said he might stretch out the number of books if his son needed to go to grad school. What if JB needed extra cash for medical expenses to save himself or a family member's life?
There's always the possibility he might need/want to write more DF books after this for whatever reason.


Jeanie | 20 comments This isn't Game of Thrones. There's no rule that says everybody including the hero must die. Of course, Harry's evil twin with the goatee can be sacrificed and we can have the predicted death of the MC like Game of Thrones and yet have our hero survive to keep hope alive for another Dresden book someday--why should the fans of that other wizard named Harry be the only ones to have their hopes spring eternal?


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Wordwizard (wordwizardw) | 107 comments Jeanie wrote: "… There's no rule that says everybody including the hero must die. Of course, Harry's evil twin with the goatee can be sacrificed … "

Harry's id is not evil, merely amoral, and he's part of Harry, so he can't die separately from him. Also, he's too entertaining and informative.

One reason why the series ends when it does is that CHANGES, where everything changes, and with the one word title, unlike all the other two word ones, was clearly meant to be the middle of the series. That would come to a total of 23, yet there's now going to be a Big Ass Trilogy extending it to 25 (Remember what I said about additional expenses requiring more books?)


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Yasmin Mazur | 196 comments I don't know why you guys are against giving Harry a Happy Ending - other than JB's abusive attitude toward him (yeah, we all read those comments in Side Jobs). May I just remind you that even Arthur Conan Doyle had to ressurect his main character after a decade of being dead - it's tempting to get rid of the thing that is consuming your life, but sooner or later you end up regretting it. Better to give him a Happy Ending, and then if there is an urge to write more stories, you can always pull him from retirement.
Of course - considering the amount of characters and untold stories of the Dresdenverse, there are plenty of stories on other people - the western Luccio starred in was interesting, as well as backround stories about basically every character - those we know and those we just heard about. Reading stories about the fall of Margaret La Fay and then her redemption would be cool, as well as stories of all the sword bearers - past, present and future.
Doing a YA series about Maggie Dresden can also be interesting.

In short - plenty of materials either way.


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Dawn (dawntm) | 20 comments I think Ebenezer owes Harry more explanation than he gives. But, as he has said previously, he wants to protect Harry.


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Wordwizard (wordwizardw) | 107 comments Dawn wrote: "I think Ebenezer owes Harry more explanation than he gives. But, as he has said previously, he wants to protect Harry."

Harry found that attitude didn't work. First, the student who thought she could contain a werewolf, that he wouldn't help, for her own good, then Susan. Then he decided to give Molly a choice, and resented being kept in the dark about Maggie. That was to protect both Maggie and him from her being held as a hostage pawn against him, which worked—until it didn't.


Caryl Huffstetler | 156 comments Wordwizard wrote: "Caryl wrote: "I suspect you are correct. I feel Harry will have lost everyone he loves except, perhaps, Maggie and that his death/sacrifice will secure the future of humanity. Why? Because JB is ve..."

I certainly hope so. But just so you know, his son is following in JB's footsteps and is writing.


Caryl Huffstetler | 156 comments Wordwizard wrote: "Dawn wrote: "I think Ebenezer owes Harry more explanation than he gives. But, as he has said previously, he wants to protect Harry."

Harry found that attitude didn't work. First, the student who t..."


Harry also didn't know that Eb had carte blanche to kill Harry had Harry gone dark. I think That's the thing that cut the deepest when he learned about Eb being the Blackstaff.


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Wordwizard (wordwizardw) | 107 comments Caryl wrote: "Harry also didn't know that Eb had carte blanche to kill Harry had Harry gone dark. I think That's the thing that cut the deepest when he learned about Eb being the Blackstaff."

No, Harry said clearly that what hurt most was that Eb had taught him morals he thought he'd believed in, and that Harry had learned to believe in, and then not practiced what he preached. That magic came from life and was for life, and must never be used to take life. He knew that Eb was responsible for Harry's good behavior with Eb's life at stake, so of course Eb could execute the Sword of Damocles on Harry if he chose. He hadn't known he was supposed to do it on the slightest pretext, is all. After all, Eb didn't follow that instruction, so why be hurt by it?


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Jay Parker | 13 comments I know when we were discussing Grave peril, we talked about how different the never-never is that adjacent to Harry apartment. Currently I am rereading Grave Peril since I am not reading in order. And at that point I believe that the never-never is very different due to the bond that Harry keeps breaking with Leah. I could be wrong but I feel the difference in relationship definitely impacts the area that protects Harry's apartment in the never-never.


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Yasmin Mazur | 196 comments Jay wrote: "I know when we were discussing Grave peril, we talked about how different the never-never is that adjacent to Harry apartment. Currently I am rereading Grave Peril since I am not reading in order. ..."

I actually had a point against what Lea said in Changes - almost forgot about it - Lea said she was guarding Harry's Nevernever side for a while, although she didn't specify for how long. Harry went to the Nevernever side in Turn Coat to look for Thomas (failed attempt no. 3) - but he didn't encounter the garden there or he wouldn't have been surprised like he was in Changes. That was about a year before - and Lea didn't try to hunt him even once during that time. Lea was supposed to be stalking him until she transferred his debt to Mab in SK - so what gives?
Possibly the garden is a recent invention of Lea, and time does move at different rates - definitely faster in the garden than in Harry's place (he had a lot of time to mess around there before coming back and getting caught by the FBI).


Paulum Mortis | 93 comments You know, JB was right, the only difference between a Hard and a Soft magic system is the viewpoint character.

Had Gandalf been pinned down—and answered honestly—there’s no doubt he’d give a simple, rational explanation as to why they didn’t just use Eagles UPS. By the same token, Harry Potter isn’t really a Wizard at all… whereas this series gives us the option of “consult four large pizzas for guidance” as the simplest and most rational solution… to an otherwise impossible problem.

But its Sanya’s reaction to such ridiculous magic nonsense what nails it!


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Yasmin Mazur | 196 comments Well, if you tell magic stories as technical, sure - but Clark's statement about sufficiently advanced technology aside, magic is not technology.
When an author invents natural laws to allow things like willpower to change the physical world - they are still just stories, not based in reality.
Sometimes i despair of people to understand that point...


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Steven Spicer (terriertribe) | 199 comments Yasmin wrote: "...they are still just stories, not based in reality.s..."

For some values of reality, I suppose that's true.

Sorry, couldn't resist. :-)


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Wordwizard (wordwizardw) | 107 comments Steven wrote: "Yasmin wrote: "...they are still just stories, not based in reality. ... "

For some values of reality, I suppose that's true.

Sorry, couldn't resist. :-)"


Probability factor one to one. We have normality. I repeat: we have normality. Anything you still can't cope with is therefore your own problem.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YCRxn...


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Leah Tamasa | 4 comments After reading Harry's talk with Uriel while Harry is paralyzed I wondered if Uriel knew Harry would go to Mab and wanted him to. Vadderung as well for that matter. Winter protects the world from the outsiders and Harry is supposed to be strong against the outsiders. Was he always supposed to be the winter knight? Did Uriel and Vadderung push him towards this path because they knew he would need it later and that the world would need him as the winter knight to protect it?

Also, Lea didn't want Harry to go to the stone table with Mab, did she not want him to become the winter knight? Or is there some other reason she warned him never to let Mab bring him there?


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Leah Tamasa | 4 comments After reading Harry's talk with Uriel while Harry is paralyzed I wondered if Uriel knew Harry would go to Mab and wanted him to. Vadderung as well for that matter. Winter protects the world from the outsiders and Harry is supposed to be strong against the outsiders. Was he always supposed to be the winter knight? Did Uriel and Vadderung push him towards this path because they knew he would need it later and that the world would need him as the winter knight to protect it?

Also, Lea didn't want Harry to go to the stone table with Mab, did she not want him to become the winter knight? Or is there some other reason she warned him never to let Mab bring him there?


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Wordwizard (wordwizardw) | 107 comments Leah Tamasa wrote: "After reading Harry's talk with Uriel while Harry is paralyzed I wondered if Uriel knew Harry would go to Mab and wanted him to. Vadderung as well for that matter. Winter protects the world from the outsiders and Harry is supposed to be strong against the outsiders. ... "
Vadderung might try to steer Harry, but Uriel is full of respect for human freedom of choice, which Uriel, an angel, does not have.


message 31: by Steven (last edited Jun 05, 2020 04:40AM) (new)

Steven Spicer (terriertribe) | 199 comments Leah Tamasa wrote: "... Also, Lea didn't want Harry to go to the stone table with Mab, did she not want him to become the winter knight? Or is there some other reason she warned him never to let Mab bring him there?"

I believe that was exactly her reason, yes. Summer Knight, page 273 (Kindle),
Lea completed her circuit of the table and stopped beside me. She glanced furtively around her, then looked me in the eyes and said, her voice barely audible, "Child. Should you survive this conflict, do not let Mab bring you here. Never."

However: At this point Lea was infected with the Adversary, via the knife she received at Bianca's party in Grave Peril. Lea knew that the only reason Mab would take Harry to the Stone Table would be for the transfer of the Winter Knight mantle, and given what apparently everyone knows but me (us?) about Harry's powers-in-waiting concerning Outsiders, I suspect that the Adversary did not want that transfer to happen and was guiding Lea's speech.

Why didn't Lea/Adversary simply kill Harry? Perhaps she couldn't (although that would be a surprise to Harry) but it seems to me that they believe they can turn him to the Outside, so to speak, or use him somehow. See (view spoiler), for instance.


Paulum Mortis | 93 comments “The light rushed closer, and I distinctly heard the horn and the engine of an oncoming train.” Such a sadistic way to end a book. OMG. After all of that you’re still going to Hell!

1/ No way is Gregori Cristos a member of this “Black Council”

2/ Molly C has a very domestic relationship with Harry. Cooking breakfast, territorial scaring, irritated by bookshelf re-organisation. Never hit me until CHANGES but, Mols wasn’t angling for—a part of her was thinking “marriage” is what I’m saying.

3/ Susan’s costume is a white ceremonial dress, like for a maiden to wear and be sacrificed to a dragon.

4/ Dresden is so scary at this point that, “You sure you want it to be like this, fellas?” is enough to make six people pee themselves.

5/ Ripping the tongue out of a Red Vampire and leaving it alive to scream… seems Winter Knighty. It’s rationalised straight after, but still. And that’s a good point about Lea—I’d assumed simple fulfilment of LeFay’s bargain, but a WKnight with a +5 vs. Outsiders would be terrible, for the outsiders!

6/ Amoracchius—Devine Intervention—nudged events so the Red Court would forget a bunch of ritual gear and need to call in for replacements. It gave the home team just a little help so they’d arrive on time for a rescue.

7/ In the opening scene, personally I believed Susan right away, but in real life when a girl who’s not been seen in eight years walks into a boy's life and (a) wants something, (b) tells him “the child is yours,” and (c) claims, “There hasn’t been anyone else, Harry.”

Sorry sweetie, but before I douse those pants of yours with fire extinguishing foam, is the bridge we’re standing on for sale?


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Steven Spicer (terriertribe) | 199 comments Paulum Mortis wrote: "“The light rushed closer, and I distinctly heard the horn and the engine of an oncoming train.” Such a sadistic way to end a book. OMG. After all of that you’re still going to Hell!

1/ No way is G..."


1 - Would be surprised if you are wrong. However, I would also be surprised if he is not their Useful Idiot. I said elsewhere that he has his own agenda, but on reflection I think that he thinks he has his own agenda.

2 - Since she was a (little) kid. Wait till you see (view spoiler).

4 - think of the stories the survivors of the island visit in Turn Coat took home. Whether true or not, I bet none of them made Harry look like a pushover.

6 - Ooooh, I hadn't considered this possibility; this calls for a lot of pondering. Thanks!

7 - (no comment, just a big smile)


message 34: by Caryl (last edited Jun 06, 2020 12:36PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Caryl Huffstetler | 156 comments 7) And that's why Uriel confirmed parentage for Harry. Because Susan- Not the most up and up of people;
stole and copied an invitation in order to crash an event Harry had warned her to stay away from,

wasn't wiling to fight the good fight in order to stay with Harry and ran away,

let herself be used by Martin against Harry when she came back to close up her Chicago apartment and job

and Then Not Telling Harry he had a child when she Knew what family would mean to him. Her flimsy excuse that living with Harry would be a life under siege doesn't hold up because who knows What Harry might have done differently had he been allowed to Be Maggie's father. She took those choices away from him- Well JB did in order to affect the story but in 'verse....

Thanks for the opportunity to vent! ;-)


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Yasmin Mazur | 196 comments the ritual was schedualed in advanced - and took a while to set up, and eventually went ahead without the stuff in that truck anyway.
Also sending something "To Mexico" is extremely weird - Look up the Lost Packages room in a local post office, it's full of stuff that the post office couldn't deliver - mostly because of bad address listing...

And eventually Harry got the address from Vadderung - the whole thing was totally useless aside from letting Harry miss his Mom a bit longer.

Yeah - sounds like something Uriel would set up...


Regarding Molly's crush on Harry - the girl is still carrying a torch for him - but after Cold Days, it should be interesting...


message 36: by Steven (new)

Steven Spicer (terriertribe) | 199 comments Yasmin wrote: "Also sending something "To Mexico" is extremely weird - Look up..."

They didn't find a shipping address, just a manila envelope with a U.S. passport, Mexican money, and a bill of lading (BoL) with the items. BoLs don't always have the destination address, often just the shipment or order number and a list of what's in the shipment. That wasn't a UPS terminal -- the intended driver would have known where he was taking that stuff, even if he didn't know the final destination.


Doubtful Ghost | 30 comments I've been wondering about the Blackstaff thing. Harry is offended at Ebeneezer for breaking the laws of magic, and offended at the Council for licensing the act, but he never wonders how Ebenezer gets away with it unscathed.

It's been mentioned repeatedly that breaking the laws of magic bends the mind of the practitioner in dangerous ways, regardless of the rationale for doing it. I gather from the battle scenes in this book that the black staff itself stands between the wielder and repercussions from using death magic, but I'm still curious why this angle never caught Harry's attention. I'd have thought it would have triggered an extensive research session with Bob about the implications.


Paulum Mortis | 93 comments Oh, oh, pick me *waves hand in the air* I actually know this one!

Black Magic warps the mind of the person using it—until the wizard starts thinking what a great idea it’d be to use kids as potions ingredients—the literal “Blackstaff” itself acts as a kind of insulation. Like you said “standing in the way”, like a buffer or something. Absorbing, or channelling the ‘harm’ before it hits your soul.

Which I suppose is that venomous black garbage, running up Ebenezar’s arm.

My guess is, if that stuff ever reaches Eb’s mouth and eyes—The Matrix style—he’ll pop like a soap bubble, or explode into gore or something. Yeash.

…and for why Harry didn’t consider the ramifications. The only thing I’m coming up with is—erm, because of the extended amounts of free time he had following the battle? What is sorta interesting is the level of SANITY implied by the White Council having Ebenezar of all people the one guy in the world with a licence to kill. This cannot be an accident!


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Wordwizard (wordwizardw) | 107 comments Paulum Mortis wrote: "Black Magic warps the mind of the person using it—until the wizard starts thinking what a great idea it’d be to use kids as potions ingredients—the literal “Blackstaff” itself acts as a kind of insulation. Like you said “standing in the way”, like a buffer or something. Absorbing, or channelling the ‘harm’ before it hits your soul."

I thought the Blackstaff turned some of the evil into blood poisoning, which the body must deal with as best it can. There's no way that murdering can magically be made not to stain one's personality. A non-magical hitman is amoral or doesn't sleep well.
There's no magic involved there; if you go about killing people it must either affect you, or there's something very wrong with you to begin with.


message 40: by Steven (last edited Jun 07, 2020 04:36PM) (new)

Steven Spicer (terriertribe) | 199 comments Doubtful wrote:"I've been wondering about the Blackstaff thing..." as well as making some excellent, thought-provoking observations.

Paulum Mortis wrote: "What is sorta interesting is the level of SANITY implied by the White Council having Ebenezar of all people the one guy in the world with a licence to kill. This cannot be an accident!"

Indeed. Being the Blackstaff seems like one of those positions where, if you volunteer for it, you're obviously not someone to be trusted with it. I bet there's a history of the holder going out feet first, too. So, how did Ebenezar get forced into it?

Wordwizard wrote:" ... There's no way that murdering can magically be made not to stain one's personality ..."

Agreed. So, do you think there's some sort of kill switch so the Senior Council (or the Merlin?) can revoke the appointment when the time comes?


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Wordwizard (wordwizardw) | 107 comments Steven wrote: "So, do you think there's some sort of kill switch so the Senior Council (or the Merlin?) can revoke the appointment when the time comes?

It seemed clear to me that when the blood poisoning becomes great enough, the body is unable to cope. The necrosis polishes the wielder off. I am amazed that the effect of crashing a satellite to murder hundreds would be survivable. Eb's constitution must be remarkable.


Doubtful Ghost | 30 comments Paulum Mortis wrote: "…and for why Harry didn’t consider the ramifications. The only thing I’m coming up with is—erm, because of the extended amounts of free time he had following the battle?"

He didn't have much of an opportunity after the battle to analyze what he saw of the Blackstaff in actual use, but he's had several years to wonder why Ebenezar hasn't been noticably altered or spiritually "stained" by Laws of Magic violations. I know I'd been wondering about it since Blood Rites.


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Lillicat | 57 comments I have an additional question about the staff itself. In Cold Days we learn that Mother Winter lost her walking stick. Now who has a stick of literal death that we know of? o_O


message 44: by Lillicat (new)

Lillicat | 57 comments If being the Blackstaff is an eventual death sentence, as seems likely given the apparent blood poisoning, perhaps Ebenezer was given it as punishment when he defended Harry. Or maybe earlier when / if he defended Margaret. We don’t know how long he’s held this position. It’d be a sneaky way to make sure someone who opposes you dies sooner than they otherwise might have.


Chris (perrins2win) | 31 comments Well, According to Kincaid Ebenezer has been the black staff for at least a century. It was about a century ago in Hungary that Ebenezer warned him not to show his face or he'd kill him.


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Yasmin Mazur | 196 comments Ebenezer is pushable, given the right incentive - he's very family oriented - if the council wanted a hitman, and they decided they wanted him (he wasn't council back then) - they could force him into the job. One has to wonder what happened to his original wife, too - why did Margaret grow up without a mother...

That black staff is creepy - nothing good comes out of black blood poisoning.
Harry didn't have time to investigate it until after Cold Days - maybe now he has some time to make inquiries. I wonder if Ebenezer made a new regular staff for himself now.


message 47: by Lillicat (new)

Lillicat | 57 comments Chris wrote: "Well, According to Kincaid Ebenezer has been the black staff for at least a century. It was about a century ago in Hungary that Ebenezer warned him not to show his face or he'd kill him."

Whoops, forgot about that. Margaret would have been over a century old, I think. Can’t remember where I saw that. Obviously not in relation to Harry though. Thanks for the reminder!


message 48: by Wordwizard (new)

Wordwizard (wordwizardw) | 107 comments Lillicat wrote: "If being the Blackstaff is an eventual death sentence, as seems likely given the apparent blood poisoning, perhaps Ebenezer was given it as punishment when he defended Harry. Or maybe earlier when / if he defended Margaret. We don’t know how long he’s held this position. It’d be a sneaky way to make sure someone who opposes you dies sooner than they otherwise might have."

No, it's not a death sentence—only if you keep using it injudiciously. Only if you keep using it (at all). If you keep following the Laws of Magic ethically, even though you have a license not to, you will come to no harm. If you use the Blackstaff, you do so at your peril. Maybe the Blackstaff judges your morals, your justification for using it, according to its own embued standards.


message 49: by Steven (new)

Steven Spicer (terriertribe) | 199 comments Blackstaff. Don't know why I didn't look here first: https://wordof.jim-butcher.com/index....

The Eb & Blackstaff stuff is down a little from the top, below sections on Ivy and Kincaid, Morgan and Wardens.


Doubtful Ghost | 30 comments Wordwizard wrote: "Maybe the Blackstaff judges your morals, your justification for using it, according to its own embued standards."

If it really is Mother Winter's missing walking stick, then its own standards (if it has any) aren't likely to be very constraining when it comes to killing people.

Given Harry's history of acquiring dubious resources, I'm wondering if the Blackstaff is going to end up in his hands at some point. Or, given his existing connection with Winter, he might be asked to retrieve it. That'd be tricky.


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