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Recommendations > Thrillers Similar To King

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message 1: by Wyatt (new)

Wyatt | 87 comments Hi. I’ve been reading King for a while, and I have almost reached the extent of what I can read (I’m younger so I try to avoid sexual content and extreme violence).
I’m looking for a non-supernatural thriller, similar to Misery or the first two Bill Hodges, all of which I loved. Trying to find books with minimum sexual content and (excessively) graphic content has become hard, seeing that sites like common sense media mainly stick to movies.
Any recommendations? Thanks in advance.


message 2: by Charles (new)

Charles | 96 comments Have you read any Neil Gaiman? Ocean at the End of the Lane is really good and he has others as well that you may like. It's a little more fantasy-esque but enjoyable none the less.


message 3: by Nick (last edited May 24, 2020 08:57PM) (new)

Nick Iuppa | 3996 comments Charles wrote: "Have you read any Neil Gaiman? Ocean at the End of the Lane is really good and he has others as well that you may like. It's a little more fantasy-esque but enjoyable none the less."


That's a great suggestion. Gaiman is one of the best, comparable in artistic skill to King, I was going to suggest Dean Koontz's Innocence .But it has some violent moments. Neil Gaiman is better.


message 4: by Michael (new)

Michael T Roch | 379 comments Except for Stephen King, anybody's who's anybody has had a guest appearance on THE BIG BANG THEORY. Neil Gaiman is somebody.


message 5: by Nick (new)

Nick Iuppa | 3996 comments Right, King only appears in cameos in his own TV shows. There's a great shot of him with a knife in his back at the opening of Mr. Mercedes.


message 6: by Hans (last edited May 25, 2020 02:10PM) (new)

Hans | 42 comments I highly recommend you try the Charlie Parker series by John Connolly. Connolly said himself that Stephen King is one of his biggest influences and when you read the Parker books it becomes quite apparent. The series mostly takes place in Maine and starts out as a pure thriller series but dips into the supernatural later on, although just lightly and it's always possible that the characters are just going crazy.

edit: Oh, I just saw that violence and sexual content are to be avoided. The Charlie Parker series is definately not without violence, but I wouldn't say it's excessively violent or overly graphic. There are some pretty grisly moments though(crime scenes for example), but if you've read the Bill Hodges books I guess you will be fine.
As to the sexual content I can't remember anything particularly shocking or overly graphic.


message 7: by Wyatt (new)

Wyatt | 87 comments I’ve read Gaiman’s books that are geared more towards kids (the Graveyard Book). Thanks for the suggestions. I’ve been trying some pulp thriller writers like James Patterson but they are too generic and boring. I will look into Ocean At The End Of The Lane as well as Every Dead Thing tonight. Thank you for the suggestions!


message 8: by Todd (new)

Todd Glaeser | 39 comments I'd Suggest Mine or Boy's Life By Robert McCammon or The Chalk Man or The Other People by C.J. Tudor.


message 9: by Hans (new)

Hans | 42 comments Wyatt wrote: "I’ve read Gaiman’s books that are geared more towards kids (the Graveyard Book). Thanks for the suggestions. I’ve been trying some pulp thriller writers like James Patterson but they are too generi..."

You might also try Norse Mythology and Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman, although both bear little similarity to any of Stephen King's works. They are really good though and quite alright for younger readers.

As for Connolly's Every Dead Thing, it's definately not geared towards kids and the atmosphere is generally very dark. But seeing as how you've read the Bill Hodges books and Misery and since Connolly is one of the authors who comes closest to Stephen King in terms of style, just try it out. You'll see pretty quickly wether you feel comfortable reading it or if you'd rather put it off for a while.

Todd wrote: "I'd Suggest Mine or Boy's Life By Robert McCammon or The Chalk Man or The Other People by C.J. Tudor."

I only read the Other People by C.J. Tudor but I think that's a very good suggestion, too.


message 10: by Kandice (new)

Kandice | 3970 comments Boy's Life By Robert McCammon is an excellent suggestion.


message 11: by Wyatt (new)

Wyatt | 87 comments Thanks to all who recommended. To those who are interested, I ordered Every Dead Thing today, and recently bought the Big Short. As soon as I get my allowance at the end of the month I’ll look into A Boy’s Life and The Other People. I think my friend owns Ocean At The End Of The Lane, so I’ll see if I can get my hands on that as well. Thanks again!


message 12: by Glen (new)

Glen | 215 comments Finally some people acknowledging John Connolly and his fabulous Charlie Parker series!!!
Connolly does write a tamer story that’s not so hardcore and graphic as his Parker series called The Book of Lost Things that’s closer to a Gaiman style fairytale type genre. You could have a look at it.


message 13: by Hans (new)

Hans | 42 comments Connolly is one of the few authors who can write in any (fiction) genre I think. He also has two short story collections named Nocturnes and Night Music which are both great and range from stuff that's similar to the Book of Lost Things to horror stories in the vein of M. R. James but of course also Stephen King.
The Samuel Johnson series is also nice and goes in a more comedic direction (think Good Omens meets Johannes Cabal).

Regarding the Charlie Parker series: Yes, it has it's graphic moments, but I think it's more the depravity and madness of some of the characters that makes it a very gloomy ride. And when I first read it I was impressed how American an Irishman can write.


message 14: by Peter (new)

Peter Topside I've always been curious about Dean Koontz. Has anyone read his books, and if so, how do they compare to King?


message 15: by Elder Prince (last edited Sep 08, 2020 08:48AM) (new)

Elder Prince (elder_prince) | 36 comments I tried to read Dean Koontz's books a while ago but I didn't feel motivated to read his entire collection for reasons it's difficult to explain. I can definitely recommend his Odd Thomas series, a very likable protagonist confronted to interesting supernatural themes. The twist was poignant in the first book. I thought the movie was great but reviews don't seem to agree with me.


message 16: by Peter (new)

Peter Topside Elder Prince wrote: "I tried to read Dean Koontz's books a while ago but I didn't feel motivated to read his entire collection for reasons it's difficult to explain. I can definitely recommend his Odd Thomas series, a ..."

Thanks for the info!


message 17: by Kandice (new)

Kandice | 3970 comments I also really enjoyed the Odd Thomas series. The rest of his are hit and miss for me.


message 18: by Kalvin (new)

Kalvin Ellis (kalvinellis) | 7 comments I love the Odd Thomas series as well.


message 19: by Joan (new)

Joan (joanofsnark) | 77 comments The Odd Thomas series is the best writing of Koontz. I've never been able to finish any of his other books.


message 20: by Erin (new)

Erin (ems84) | 2103 comments Joan wrote: "The Odd Thomas series is the best writing of Koontz. I've never been able to finish any of his other books."

Agreed.


message 21: by Hans (last edited Oct 09, 2020 12:22PM) (new)

Hans | 42 comments Joan wrote: "The Odd Thomas series is the best writing of Koontz. I've never been able to finish any of his other books."

I tried Odd Thomas and at first I liked it, but then something else came up and I never really cared to pick it up again. I think one of the things that bothered me most was that Odd himself is such an utterly unbelievable character. He's supposed to be in his early 20s I believe, but his whole tone sounds like a 50ish kinda guy and while I liked his general tone and attitude, I never really managed to connect it to the guy he's supposed to be.


message 22: by Femmy (new)

Femmy | 195 comments I read Dean Koontz a long time ago, about the same time I started reading Stephen King. Some of the books I really liked: Lightning, Phantoms, and Cold Fire.


message 23: by Alischa (new)

Alischa K. | 3 comments Dean Koontz for sure!


message 24: by Andre (last edited Oct 11, 2020 01:49PM) (new)

Andre (andre94) | 45 comments I also read my first Koontz around the same time as I started reading King, in high school. My English teacher helped me choose The Bad Place for a final project. I have forgotten much of it but I remember enjoying it, and it also being really weird. Maybe not a great choice for someone specifically avoiding graphic content or for younger readers, but it felt appropriate for high school.


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