Reading German Books in 2020 discussion

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Level 2: Seewinkel > Kirsten's Moving Up to Seewinkel

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message 1: by Kirsten (new)

Kirsten (kirsten0929) | 23 comments Newly arrived in Seewinkel. Read The Sorrows of Werther, The Artificial Silk Girl, The Loser, German Women Writers of the Twentieth Century, and The Hottest Dishes of the Tartar Cuisine to get here.

Next up for me, The Train Was on Time by Heinrich Boll. Really enjoying the journey!


message 2: by Penelope (new)

Penelope  | 90 comments Kirsten wrote: "Newly arrived in Seewinkel. Read The Sorrows of Werther, The Artificial Silk Girl, The Loser, German Women Writers of the Twentieth Century, and The Hottest Dishes of the Tartar Cuisine to get here..."

its exciting isn't it to move up. let me know how you go with German Women Writers of the 29tnC. I had downloaded a copy but found the typeface impossible to read - really small, so made it bigger, only for it to jump back to small every time I turned a page. After a couple of bios and one and a half stories couldnt do it.


message 3: by Kirsten (new)

Kirsten (kirsten0929) | 23 comments Penelope wrote: "Kirsten wrote: "Newly arrived in Seewinkel. Read The Sorrows of Werther, The Artificial Silk Girl, The Loser, German Women Writers of the Twentieth Century, and The Hottest Dishes of the Tartar Cui..."

Hi Penelope, it really is exciting to move up. :-) Oh my gosh, the print was tiny in the hardback version too, so tiny I thought I was going to have to get stronger reading glasses! I made it through, but I'm sure I too would have given up if I was having your experience. Such a shame because they were wonderful and two or three of them have really stuck with me.


message 4: by Penelope (new)

Penelope  | 90 comments Kirsten wrote: "Penelope wrote: "Kirsten wrote: "Newly arrived in Seewinkel. Read The Sorrows of Werther, The Artificial Silk Girl, The Loser, German Women Writers of the Twentieth Century, and The Hottest Dishes ..."
Well I have it still so haven't given up entirely. It is also so positive when stories stick with you. good reading!


message 5: by Kirsten (new)

Kirsten (kirsten0929) | 23 comments Just finished my first book in Seewinkel, Heinrich Boll's, The Train Was on Time. Short but intense, I really liked it. Not sure yet what my next one will be.


message 6: by Kirsten (new)

Kirsten (kirsten0929) | 23 comments Just finished Stefan Zweig's memoir, The World of Yesterday. It was fantastic - compelling and beautiful. I wish there was a memoir like this for every time and place. So much better than any history book!


message 7: by Christiane (new)

Christiane | 69 comments Thanks, a new tbr ;-) I think, it was "easier" in his time to tell about Yesterday, becauce after war, the world was so clearly different. Maybe after the sixties we could see a difference, and after the late 80ties/ early 90ties again. I guess/think, there are many books about that changes (?).
Grimmelshausen "Simplicissimus" is one early version about change.


message 8: by Kirsten (new)

Kirsten (kirsten0929) | 23 comments Christiane wrote: "Thanks, a new tbr ;-) I think, it was "easier" in his time to tell about Yesterday, becauce after war, the world was so clearly different. Maybe after the sixties we could see a difference, and aft..."

Oh, yes, I hope you do pick it up! It's true, there aren't many periods of time that will contain events as big and meaningful as two world wars, but I suppose every time period has its markers - events by which to measure before and after. A pandemic, might be one example, lol.


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