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message 1: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 9975 comments Mod
The twentieth century saw many classic crime writers sell in large quantities.


A trend which continues to this day.

This is a discussion thread to highlight and debate your favourite crime writers and crime novels.

Who do you like?

Which are you favourite crime novels?


message 2: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 9975 comments Mod
I'm currently reading....


Mr. Bowling Buys a Newspaper (1943) by Donald Henderson

Has anyone come across it?

It's very good and I am completely beguiled so far.

Dark, somewhat surreal and strange.

I can see clear parallels with Patrick Hamilton's Hangover Square which is, as we know, a very good thing.

It's set in London during WW2 and whilst it is a crime novel it's one which doesn't follow any kind of predictable template.

The central character appears to be a serial killer whose first person narrative give us insights into his thought processes which are often darkly funny. This emphasis on psychology also reminds me of Patricia Highsmith.

So far it's heady stuff. I'll keep you posted.




message 3: by David (new)

David Putnam (davidputnam) | 7 comments Tony Hillerman, Michael Connelly, Charles Willeford, Jim Thompson, John D. MacDonald, Masters of the craft.


message 4: by Kirsten (new)

Kirsten  (kmcripn) The Lord Peter Wimsey series by Dorothy L. Sayers. Wonderful! Highly recommended!!


message 5: by Elizabeth (Alaska) (last edited May 22, 2020 08:00AM) (new)

Elizabeth (Alaska) As I posted in the Georges Simenon thread, I'm quite a fan of his Maigret series. I also like Dorothy B. Hughes, who is quite dark. In the same vein, I plan to try, but haven't yet, Vera Caspary. NigeyB, as you like Simenon, you might like Hughes.

I have some very early 20th Century authors to continue/try: Anna Katharine Green, Mary Roberts Rinehart, Maurice LeBlanc, R. Austin Freeman, Gaston Leroux, Marcel Allain, Arthur B. Reeve, Jack Boyle.


message 6: by David (new)

David Putnam (davidputnam) | 7 comments I have an omnibus of Dorthy L. Sayers on deck but keep moving her back, I'm might have to give her a try.


message 7: by Nigeyb (last edited May 22, 2020 08:32AM) (new)

Nigeyb | 9975 comments Mod
Thanks all - and thanks for the tip Elizabeth


I do indeed like Maigret but like Simenon's Romans Durs even more, although they are often not crime

I generally prefer the more noirish, darker, hard boiled end of the genre - e.g. Raymond Chandler, Henning Mankell, Derek Raymond, David Peace's Red Riding Quartet, Jim Thompson, Jame Elroy. Although now and again a well constructed Golden Age type mystery can make a nice change.


message 8: by Rosina (new)

Rosina (rosinarowantree) | 250 comments Michael Innes' Appleby series, Iain Pears' series about art detectives Jonathan Argyll and Flavia di Stefano, and Reginald Hill's Pascoe and Dalziel are the ones I read and re-read.


Elizabeth (Alaska) Nigeyb wrote: "I generally prefer the more noirish, darker, hard boiled end of the genre -"

This is why I think you'd like Hughes. She is very dark and what I've read are psychological in nature.


message 10: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 9975 comments Mod
I'm rubbing my hands in anticipation Elizabeth


Elizabeth (Alaska) Rosina wrote: "Iain Pears' series about art detectives Jonathan Argyll and Flavia di Stefano."

I have enjoyed these too!


message 12: by Jill (new)

Jill (dogbotsmum) | 651 comments Nigeyb wrote: "The twentieth century saw many classic crime writers sell in large quantities.


A trend which continues to this day.

This is a discussion thread to highlight and debate your favourite crime wri..."

We did read Mr. Bowling Buys a Newspaper in Reading The Detectives (Susan and Judy's other Group) back in 2018. The threads will still be there if you want to take a look.


message 13: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 9975 comments Mod
Jill wrote: "We read Mr. Bowling Buys a Newspaper in Reading The Detectives (Susan and Judy's other Group) back in 2018.

The threads will still be there if you want to take a look"


That's interesting - thanks Jill

I always assume, maybe wrongly now, that the Detectives group is focussed on Golden Age. It was the primary focus when I was a member a few years back.

I'll certainly go and find the thread when I finish this book.


message 14: by Judy (new)

Judy (wwwgoodreadscomprofilejudyg) | 4616 comments Mod
I think we have broadened out a bit over there, Nigeyb - we have certainly read a lot of books from the 40s and 50s and quite a lot of later ones too. I found Mr Bowling interesting but was not a huge fan - this was my review:

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

And these are the Detectives threads: Non-spoiler
https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...
And spoiler
https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...


message 15: by Susan (new)

Susan | 10169 comments Mod
I LOVED Mr Bowling Buys a Newspaper, Nigeyb. I also enjoyed A Voice Like Velvet by the same author.

I like too many crime authors/novels to mention. I enjoy GA crime, but also modern crime.

Just read, and loved, The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie (Flavia de Luce, #1) by Alan Bradley

Agatha Christie is my favourite crime author of all time, if I had to plump for just one.


message 16: by Jill (new)


message 17: by Judy (new)

Judy (wwwgoodreadscomprofilejudyg) | 4616 comments Mod
I also have many favourite crime writers - I tend to be at the lighter end of the spectrum from you, Nigeyb, though I do like some hardboiled sleuths. My favourites include Margery Allingham, Dorothy L Sayers, Conan Doyle and Rex Stout, and I have been enjoying reading various other republished writers in British Library Crime Classics and other imprints.

I do also enjoy some current writers, though, including Rhys Bowen - I love her gentle Constable Owen mysteries set in Wales, and also enjoyed the first in her Molly Murphy historical mysteries.


Elizabeth (Alaska) I'm another to vote for Rex Stout!


message 19: by Jill (last edited May 23, 2020 06:53AM) (new)

Jill (dogbotsmum) | 651 comments I like so many crime authors it is hard for me to say. Ian Rankin, Peter Robinson, Stuart McBride, C.J.Sansom, Michael Connelly, Reginald Hill and many golden age ones to name but a few.


message 20: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 9975 comments Mod
I've enjoyed a few of Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe/Archie Goodwin books - Wolfe is one of the many great literary crime solvers


message 21: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 9975 comments Mod
Susan wrote: "I LOVED....


....Mr. Bowling Buys a Newspaper, Nigeyb. "


Thanks Susan. That's good to know.

I am nearly at the end now and am still really enjoying it. A very unusual crime book with some very dark humour.

It's almost the inverse of a murder mystery despite featuring several murders.

I'm so impressed: compulsively readable, wryly humorous, whilst at the same time quite horrific.



Susan wrote: "I also enjoyed A Voice Like Velvet by the same author."

I shall be reading that one too

Apparently Donald Henderson also wrote as D H Landels and produced 17 novels, although none are on GoodReads there are some listed on Amazon and Abebooks


message 22: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 9975 comments Mod
I've now finished....


Mr. Bowling Buys a Newspaper (1943) by Donald Henderson

I popped over to the Reading the Detectives discussion and added a post. Thanks for the top tip. I enjoyed reading the comments.

Mr. Bowling Buys a Newspaper is heady and compelling, and I recommend it

Here’s my review

4/5


message 23: by Jill (new)

Jill (dogbotsmum) | 651 comments Elizabeth (Alaska) wrote: "As I posted in the Georges Simenon thread, I'm quite a fan of his Maigret series. I also like Dorothy B. Hughes, who is quite dark. In the same vein, I plan to try, but haven't yet, ..."

I seem to have some of Dorothy B. Hughes so have added them to my list


Elizabeth (Alaska) Jill, if you and Nigeyb want to do a buddy read this summer for a Hughes, let's talk about it. I have her penciled in. The one I've planned is Ride the Pink Horse. But I could swap that for any of these:

Johnnie
The Scarlet Imperial
The Candy Kid
The Davidian Report

I don't know how many of these actually fit the crime genre.


message 25: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 9975 comments Mod
Thanks Elizabeth, I'll mull it over and let you know if I feel inspired and can fit it in


message 26: by Jill (new)

Jill (dogbotsmum) | 651 comments Ride the Pink Horse is one I have, the others I don't think I have got. I would be willing to fit in .


Elizabeth (Alaska) Jill, I think the mods are very open to member buddy reads. I haven't one for Aug/Sep (discuss Aug 15). Does that work for you?


message 28: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 9975 comments Mod
Absolutely


message 29: by Jill (new)

Jill (dogbotsmum) | 651 comments Elizabeth (Alaska) wrote: "Jill, I think the mods are very open to member buddy reads. I haven't one for Aug/Sep (discuss Aug 15). Does that work for you?"

Yes, that would be fine.


Elizabeth (Alaska) Thanks, Jill. I'll blacken it in.


message 31: by Annabel (new)

Annabel Frazer | 82 comments Kirsten #savetheturtle #curecrohnsandcolitis #playsomejazz wrote: "The Lord Peter Wimsey series by Dorothy L. Sayers. Wonderful! Highly recommended!!"

Although Sayers and Lord Peter bug me a bit on occasion, I generally stick to my theory that Sayers is the best writer of the Golden Age dection era. Her books are always a real pleasure to reread.

I will also always reread Agatha Christie like a shot, even though I know who did every single murder, and I am rather attached to the 1920s-set Dandy Gilver series. And then I have a sneaking fondness for Patricia Wentworth - her novels, contemporary with Christie, are often nonsensical and poorly-plotted but they are very soothing comfort reads, especially if you like a love story woven in with your implausibly-orchestrated murder.


message 32: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 1241 comments John Dickson Carr (a/k/a Carter Dickson) is one of my faves. Others include Nero Wolfe, Agatha Christie, Dorothy Sayers. More modern ones include Robert Crais and Deborah Crombie. I like a number of others, too.


message 33: by Nigeyb (last edited May 23, 2020 10:47PM) (new)

Nigeyb | 9975 comments Mod
Elizabeth (Alaska) wrote: "Jill, I think the mods are very open to member buddy reads. I haven't one for Aug/Sep (discuss Aug 15). Does that work for you?"

Jill wrote: "Yes, that would be fine."

Ride the Pink Horse is on the schedule and the bookshelf

Just create the thread in the buddy reads section when you're ready to go


message 34: by Lynaia (new)

Lynaia | 468 comments I’ve enjoyed the Phryne Fisher novels by Kerry Greenwood.


Elizabeth (Alaska) Nigeyb wrote: "Ride the Pink Horse is on the schedule and the bookshelf

Just create the thread in the buddy reads section when you're ready to go"


Thanks!


message 36: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 9975 comments Mod
I've recently started....


Malice Aforethought (1931) by Francis Iles

So far I am really impressed. I'll keep you posted.

Malice Aforethought (1931) is a crime novel written by Anthony Berkeley Cox, using the pen name Francis Iles. It is an early and prominent example of the "inverted detective story", claimed to have been invented by R. Austin Freeman some years earlier. The murderer's identity is revealed in the first line of the novel, which gives the reader insight into the workings of his mind as his plans progress. It also contains elements of black comedy, and of serious treatment of underlying tensions in a superficially respectable community. It is loosely based on the real-life case of Herbert Armstrong, with elements of Doctor Crippen.

So like Goodbye to Murder and Mr. Bowling Buys a Newspaper, which we read and discussed recently, the reader is made aware of the murderer early on in the narrative

Malice Aforethought is still a bargain £1.99 for Kindle in the UK

You may well ask who is Francis Iles?

Anthony Berkeley Cox was born in 1893 in Watford, and educated at Sherborne School and University College, Oxford. After serving in the British Army in the First World War, he worked as a journalist for many years, contributing to such magazines as Punch and The Humorist.

His first novel, The Layton Court Mystery, was published anonymously in 1925. It introduced Roger Sheringham, the amateur detective who features in many of the author's novels including the classic Poisoned Chocolates Case. In 1930, Berkeley founded the Detection Club in London along with Agatha Christie, Freeman Wills Crofts and other established mystery writers.

His 1932 novel (as "Francis Iles"), Before the Fact was adapted into the 1941 classic film Suspicion, directed by Alfred Hitchcock, starring Cary Grant and Joan Fontaine. Trial and Error was turned into the unusual 1941 film Flight From Destiny starring Thomas Mitchell.

In 1938, he took up book reviewing for John O'London's Weekly and the Daily Telegraph, writing under his pen name Francis Iles. He also wrote for the Sunday Times in the 1940s and for the Manchester Guardian, later The Guardian, from the mid-1950s until 1970. A key figure in the development of crime fiction, he died in 1971 in St John's Wood, London.





Elizabeth (Alaska) That looks really good, Nigeyb. Not like I need more books to lust after, but I've added it to my wish list.


message 38: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 1241 comments Still $9.99 here. Maybe after I get my tax refund. Luckily they extended the due date, thanks to the pandemic. But as I was recovering from cancer treatments I was glad to have the time.

Treatments are over, save for the taking of a pill daily and seeing the doctor every three months.


message 39: by Judy (new)

Judy (wwwgoodreadscomprofilejudyg) | 4616 comments Mod
Good to hear that your treatments are over, Jan - hope you continue to recover well.


message 40: by Susan (new)

Susan | 10169 comments Mod
Yes, good to hear you are recovering, Jan. Wishing you lots of rest and reading time X


message 41: by CQM (new)

CQM Elizabeth (Alaska) wrote: "As I posted in the Georges Simenon thread, I'm quite a fan of his Maigret series. I also like Dorothy B. Hughes, who is quite dark. In the same vein, I plan to try, but haven't yet, ..."

I can definitely second Elizabeth's Dorothy B. Hughes recommendation. I've only read a couple but I loved Ride the Pink Horse and they made some cracking film noir out of her books.


message 42: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 9975 comments Mod
Oooh thanks CQM, thanks Elizabeth


Just making a note to investigate Dorothy B. Hughes - I'll see if I can join in the buddy read


message 43: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 9975 comments Mod
Dr Bickleigh, is quite the Don Juan


That Malice Aforethought has elements of Herbert Rowse Armstrong...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herbert...

...and Dr Hawley Harvey Crippen...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawley_...

Prompted me to read up on their cases


message 44: by Susan (new)

Susan | 10169 comments Mod
Talking of classic crime cases, there is a new book out on Christie in August. I have seen it on NetGalley, but haven't requested as I have too many to read/review for August, but I might read it later.

Inside 10 Rillington Place: The untold horror of my life with a serial killer Inside 10 Rillington Place The untold horror of my life with a serial killer by Peter Thorley

With Crippen, there are a couple of novels, I know; one by John Boyne. Also, Doctor Crippen The Infamous London Cellar Murder of 1910 by Nicholas Connell Doctor Crippen: The Infamous London Cellar Murder of 1910 and the author also wrote Walter Dew: The Man Who Caught Crippen Walter Dew The Man Who Caught Crippen by Nicholas Connell


message 45: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 1241 comments Judy wrote: "Good to hear that your treatments are over, Jan - hope you continue to recover well."

Thanks Judy and Susan.


message 46: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 9975 comments Mod
Nigeyb wrote:


"Malice Aforethought has elements of Herbert Rowse Armstrong and Dr Hawley Harvey Crippen"

Into the second half now, and Malice Aforethought is getting better and better as the tension continues to build


message 47: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 9975 comments Mod
I should finish Malice Aforethought tonight


I'm really enjoying it. Top tip for the detectives reading group, if you haven't already done it


message 48: by Judy (new)

Judy (wwwgoodreadscomprofilejudyg) | 4616 comments Mod
Thanks Nigeyb - we haven't done it, though we did recently do another inverted mystery, as I think has been previously mentioned, The 12:30 from Croydon by Freeman Wills Crofts(the title refers to a flight, not a train!)


message 49: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 9975 comments Mod
Thanks Judy - just had a skim through the discussion and it sounds good but perhaps not brilliant. I'm no expert however, from my limited experience, I would place Malice Aforethought into a more superior category. 4/5 stars as opposed to 3/4.


message 50: by Nigeyb (new)


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