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#17: Rainbow Riddle > Chapter 10: The Rainbow Riddle - Summary

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William Land (williamland) | 1235 comments Mod
Chapter 10: Indigo Inn

Peter is watching Judy look through the dictionary, he thinks she is looking up Indian and suggests they follow a trail up ahead but she points out Indigo and gets very excited. The second meaning is the one they are interested in “2 A deep violet blue. One of the seven so called colors of the rainbow!” “Golly, you got it right, even if you had to guess, That’s exactly the shade of Pauline’s dress.” Yes and Kay’s too. Lorraine and I both guessed right by accident. But that isn't what I am excited about. It’s Indigo Inn. Peter, do you realize that we are about to stop at still another place named after one of the colors of the rainbow?“ Peter whistled softly and said that he wishes they had known that when they talked to Mr Trent.” (Shouldn't Mr Trent have noticed that when he drew up the itinerary for them or did he know it and think they knew or didn't need to know) “So do I.“ Judy agreed. “I didn't mention Roberta’s rainbow ring, either. Could this be it, Peter? This string of inns and restaurants?” “It could be,” Peter said thoughtfully. “There’s the Yellow Bowl in Farringdon too--” Judy agrees that is a rainbow color too. Again Peter whistled “Angel, it looks as if we are up to our necks in something, but as yet I don't have any ideas. Do you?” Judy shook her head but suggested getting to the Indigo Inn. “No Angel,!” Peter objected “We are not going to Indigo Inn. After all, I want my bride safe. Judy, that package--” Judy shuddered. “I know what you're thinking. But if Dale and Irene sent it, that’ s impossible. I told you it was Dale’s writing on the outside.” “Couldn't it have been imitated?” Peter wondered. Judy asked why, he answered. “I know it sounds like a cheap melodrama, but couldn't it have been just as Roberta said, that whoever sent it thought we knew too much about the rainbow ring?” “ You mean this string of restaurants and inns?” “Well not exactly. I mean the secret behind them. Something was going on at Green Gables. Maybe the same sort of thing goes on at all these places. That could have been Mr Trent’s reason for watching the door so carefully at the Blue Kitchen..” Judy agreed but wondered why anyone would thing they knew about it and want to blow them up. Peter’s hand closed over hers as he said, “You don't think that the explosion was in the stone quarry, do you?” “Oh Peter, I don't know what to think. I won't let Dale and Irene be involved. That’s one think I am sure of. As for Roberta, I won't pretend to understand her. .” “That’s the next thing to do then,” declared Peter, “We must see Roberta and get her story straight.” “Wouldn't it be simpler,” Judy asked, “to just call up Dale and ask him about the present? We could tell him we misplaced it or something, and were curious about what was in it.” There was a public telephone in a drugstore opposite the library. Irene answered the phone and she asked if they got their present in time. Irene told Judy that it was a little portable radio and they had hoped that Judy & Peter would get it in time to hear her program. Irene asks Judy where they are and when Judy answers near Indigo Inn, Irene exclaims “Indigo Inn! Are you and Peter going to stop there? You really must. It’s a delightful place. They have dancing every night and you meet the most charming people.” “You do? How do you happen to know about it, Irene?” “Why, Dale and I stopped there once. But what’s wrong, Judy? You sound so strange” Judy felt strange and asked her questions about how the present was wrapped. Dale addressed the package and Irene helped wrap it. It was in a box, in corrugated paper and marked “Fragile” at each end. It sounded like Judy’s package. Judy wondered what color it was. (the radio) “Eggshell, to match the book shelves you told me you intended to build at either side of the fireplace in your house in Dry Brook Hollow. I thought it would look well among your books. Dale had it built to order by a friend of his who does wood carving. The cabinet has wings---” “And a friend of yours carved?” Irene says that Judy doesn’t sound like herself at all. Judy asks “Don’t I? Does Dale know a woman named Mrs. Griggs? Roberta’s aunt.” “No I don’t believe he does. You told me about Roberta.” “She was my flower girl.” “Really? I didn’t think you knew her that well--” “I don’t,: Judy interrupted. “I don’t know her at all. Peter and I are on our way to NY. We’ll see you tomorrow and tell you all about it. Bye Irene.” Judy found Peter buying a box a chocolates at the counter, she turns down his offer of one saying she feel faint. As they walked back to the car Judy tells Peter that they may as well stay at the Indigo Inn, that Irene & Dale had stayed there so it must be all right. Judy is unusually quiet and Peter asks her “Don’t you feel like telling me about it, Angel?” Judy tells him she doesn’t know what to say because she doesn’t know what to think.” Peter was concerned, “Then it was a radio and Irene & Dale sent the package themselves?“ Judy describes the radio “Oh Peter, what could have happened?” Judy was crying now for the first time since they had been married and she was ashamed of her tears and tried to hide them. “Don’t let it get you Angel,” he said comfortingly, “There’ll be an explanation of all this. Maybe Roberta--” “But I don’t want to suspect her!” cried Judy. “Honestly, Peter, if she were my own little girl, I couldn’t be any fonder of her. It just isn’t logical to think she’d make up all this to frighten me. Anyway, how would she have known it was a radio if she hadn’t overheard something?” “You’ ve got me there,” Peter admitted. “Dale or his friend may know her aunt, but I doubt it. Maybe she just guessed it was a radio from the size and shape of the package. She was certainly determined not to let you open it.” “She tried everything, didn’t she? I can’t help but admire her determination., but it does hurt when I think she may have actually taken my radio. It’s almost as bad as if you had stole something from me.” “I did, Angel, I stole your heart.” Judy laughed through her tears and thought it was good of Peter to always make her feel better.

“Do you think they accommodate thieves at the Indigo Inn?” Judy asked laughing. “It looks like it,” replied Peter as he pulled up in front of the inn. Why else would they send a bellhop out to inspect our license plates?” “Now he’s running back into the inn,” Judy exclaimed,” I am afraid I don't like it.” “Shall we register anyway” “Wait a minute. I want to powder my nose and straighten my hair. Irene says you meet the most charming people----” “ That wouldn't be one of them, would it?“ Peter asked as he indicated a man whose face seemed familiar somehow. He was staring at them as they entered the inn. Then Judy remembered that she had seemed him at the Yellow Bowl in Farringdon. At the desk they were asked if they had reservations and when Peter said he didn't, he was told that every room was taken. He advised Peter to take a hotel in town. When asked what town, the man replied that Albany was only 60 miles with plenty of hotels. As they drove away, Judy remarked that it didn't seem possible that every room was taken. “That’s not the half of it,” replied Peter, “While we were talking to the clerk, a woman started to get out of the elevator in the lobby. She took one look at us and jumped right back in. I only caught a glimpse of her, but---I could swear that it was Roberta’s aunt.” “It can't be!” cried Judy and in the next minute became alarmed, “ Peter, suppose you are right and it is Mrs. Griggs, then what happened to Roberta? Pauline and Sylvia were supposed to take her to Mrs. Grigg’s house in Connecticut!”

Hasn't it been driving everyone crazy that a few days have passed and we don't know what has happened with Roberta. Did she go to NYC with Pauline & Sylvia? Peter seems quite taken and concerned for her but they haven’t called home to check on her or ask the Boltons to keep her. I found it a little surprising when Judy said she couldn’t be fonder of Roberta if she were her own. I didn’t think that Judy showed enough concern or affection for Roberta up to this point, since Roberta has obviously been through an awful lot of a little 8 year old girl. I do realize though that Judy was very busy with her wedding day and honeymoon, I just think she could have thought a little more.

Isn't it interesting to think you could have a radio built in a cabinet that was custom built? I love the look back to the past.

When Peter says ‘up to our necks’ I thought of the Thin Man series, I found 6 titles made from 1934 to 1947. I would think that the popularity of those movies would have made G&D see some possibilities for Judy & Peter instead of Peter being an obstacle to overcome.


William Land (williamland) | 1235 comments Mod
I thought it was clever of Judy to find a library and search a dictionary for the information she was seeking. Several times in the series, Margaret Sutton has shown her readers the importance of a dictionary; a volume which was prominently featured in the first book of the series in which Judy had studied the dictionary in preparation for a spelling bee.

I find it sweet that Peter called Judy Angel twice more and told her that she "stole his heart." They are very suited to each other. So romantic!


Rebekah (rebroxanna) | 607 comments I'm confused as to whether Judy thinks Roberta stole her radio like it was a crime, or to save her life.


message 4: by Rachelle (new) - added it

Rachelle | 74 comments Mod
Using a library to find a dictionary is something, most of us do not have to do. Computers or our cell phones allow us to access dictionary.com and find our answers quickly. When I started doing Information and Referral, I used the librarians to find agencies that I could not locate or did not have 800 numbers. Larger libraries had telephone books from different areas and they did not charge for numbers as the phone company did.


William Land (williamland) | 1235 comments Mod
Rachelle wrote: "Using a library to find a dictionary is something, most of us do not have to do. Computers or our cell phones allow us to access dictionary.com and find our answers quickly. ...>>

Yes, in these modern times with the advent of the world wide web and computer applications, one does not have to use print volumes very much. When I continued working in libraries in the 21st century, I rarely had to consult a print volume. Using the internet, both paid and unpaid electronic information would usually be found more quickly and easily.

But in the days before the world wide web, libraries were limited to the resources in their [often small and limited] collections to find resources and information. Much of the time the searches took a long time and were cumbersome to complete. I spend much of my life until my early 40s poring through printed materials to answer my questions and those of my library patrons.

As much as I like computers and truly appreciate the world wide web, there is nothing better than reading a printed page for me. When I read for pleasure, I prefer a printed book. But I had to accept an e-book reader because some of the books from authors I enjoy are only available electronically. Additionally, the cost of an e-book is usually less than that of a print copy.

Many of our favourite vintage series books would not work easily in the modern times of computer, internet, cell phone and other technology. Nancy, Judy, or Frank and Joe didn't call home often while sleuthing because they couldn't find a phone booth!


message 6: by Beverly (new)

Beverly | 1002 comments William wrote: Many of our favourite vintage series books would not work easily in the modern times of computer, internet, cell phone and other technology. Nancy, Judy, or Frank and Joe didn't call home often while sleuthing because they couldn't find a phone booth!.>>..."

Yes, Yellow Phantom completely falls apart with a cell phone. Same with Fog Island.


message 7: by Lindsay (new)

Lindsay Stroh | 128 comments Cell phones can get dropped, dumped overboard, stolen, turned off or be in an area with no service. I have been watching a lot of Hallmark mystery movies lately, and despite all the modern technology, the new sleuths still manage to get in trouble!


message 8: by Lindsay (new)

Lindsay Stroh | 128 comments Margaret Sutton had a huge Funk & Wagnalls dictionary, about a foot thick, that she kept on its own table in her study. I remember doing my homework (write the word, define it and use it in a sentence). Instead of looking it up, I would call out, "Mom what does this word mean?" and she would tell me, and often give me an example. After a few times, she would say, "Wait a minute! Are you having me do your homework? Look it up in the dictionary!"


message 9: by Beverly (new)

Beverly | 1002 comments Lindsay wrote: "Cell phones can get dropped, dumped overboard, stolen, turned off or be in an area with no service. I have been watching a lot of Hallmark mystery movies lately, and despite all the modern technolo..."

Good point, Lindsay. Or the villain could confiscated it. a girl was murdered after the murderer sent a fake message and turned off the phone.
Beverly


Rebekah (rebroxanna) | 607 comments Lindsay wrote: "Cell phones can get dropped, dumped overboard, stolen, turned off or be in an area with no service. I have been watching a lot of Hallmark mystery movies lately, and despite all the modern technolo..."
A whole gamut of plot devices is needed to deprive the victim or detective of cell phone service!


message 11: by Rachelle (new) - added it

Rachelle | 74 comments Mod
I live in an area where there are places that do not have cell service or not great cell service. In fact, I can only get out on my cell in certain places in Potter County.


message 12: by Faye (new)

Faye Kisker | 382 comments My mother and my aunt both had prominent dictionaries that were about 8 to 10 inches thick. As a child I loved to read the dictionary and encyclopedias. My kids would be saying "Nerd alert"


Rebekah (rebroxanna) | 607 comments Faye, I used to do the same thing!


message 14: by Faye (new)

Faye Kisker | 382 comments It makes us good at trivia, doesn't it?


message 15: by Beverly (new)

Beverly | 1002 comments Faye wrote: "My mother and my aunt both had prominent dictionaries that were about 8 to 10 inches thick. As a child I loved to read the dictionary and encyclopedias. My kids would be saying "Nerd alert""

I was given one of those thick dictionaries when I graduated and then I found a second at a library sale when a private school closed. They remind me of the Spelling Bee in Vanishing Shadow.


message 16: by Faye (new)

Faye Kisker | 382 comments I thought the same thing.


message 17: by Beverly (new)

Beverly | 1002 comments William wrote: "I thought it was clever of Judy to find a library and search a dictionary for the information she was seeking. Several times in the series, Margaret Sutton has shown her readers the importance of a..."

Now that I think of it, why didn't Judy use the dictionary at the farmhouse? Or maybe she hadn't been there recently.


J. Michael | 130 comments Rachelle wrote: "I live in an area where there are places that do not have cell service or not great cell service. In fact, I can only get out on my cell in certain places in Potter County."

Yes, at home I had to purchase a "mini cell tower" before I could get mobile phone service. It sits on my desk and I get five bars all over the house. But when I go outside, my bars drop down to one and it's very difficult to maintain a connection.

I really love all the plot complications that come to the surface in this busy chapter: the identification of the seventh color of the rainbow; the shadow of suspicion falling on Dale; the strange reception at the Indigo Inn; the possible sighting of Roberta's aunt; and finally, the question of what happened to Roberta when Pauline and Sylvia returned her to Connecticut. Lots of juicy developments!


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