Biography, Autobiography, Memoir discussion

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e-books

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message 1: by Selina (new)

Selina (literatelibrarian) | 2460 comments What do you think of e-books and what is your experience of reading them?

Mine is not very good. I only read them if I cant find a hard copy i.e a paper book.
I do not have a dedicated device and have no idea how much they cost.
I dont buy them ever, if I do download any it will be free from the library.
I dont read books on my smartphone, the only thing I would use is this ipad.
I dont go looking for them on amazon.

So sorry authors who say you can buy them for 99cents on amazon or kindle...I dont have a kindle. And I dont see the need to buy one. I have borrowed a kindle from someone who lent hers to me on my travels but then as I was reading it she didnt have any access to it so I dont think they are great for sharing if your entire library is on one device.


message 2: by Koren (new)

Koren  (koren56) | 2936 comments Mod
Selina wrote: "What do you think of e-books and what is your experience of reading them?

Mine is not very good. I only read them if I cant find a hard copy i.e a paper book.
I do not have a dedicated device an..."


I like e-books for the convenience of not having to carry a book with me and it's really nice if I'm going away I dont have to carry a bag full of books. Also if I want to get a book instantly and I dont have to spend time and gas to go to the library. It saves a few trees. On the other hand, I do prefer the feel and smell of a real book and seeing how far I am (half way through). The light on the phone makes my eyes tired. I've tried dimming the light and that helps some but not completely. On the plus side, no one asks what I'm reading, which is really annoying if I dont want to talk to anyone about what I am reading!


message 3: by Julie (new)

Julie (julielill) | 1332 comments I prefer to read physical books but I have read one book on my iPad and liked it. You could bookmark where you ended reading. My only complaint/fear was that I read a lot in bed and I was afraid I would fall asleep and my iPad would fall on the floor and break. But that has not happened. I do have a hold on a book but due to its popularity I haven't gotten it yet.


Woman Reading Physical books are the versions I prefer most, especially if they have illustrations or are just long.

But even before the Covid19 - library closures, I would access my library electronic platforms because of the convenience factors:
- I could lighten my luggage weight during trips.
- I could read anytime that I was stuck waiting somewhere.
- Sometimes, the ebook / audio version was the only type my library owned.
- I love being able to bookmark freely & even label them the way that I want.
- I could access audio books without dealing with changing CDs.
- Audio books are fantastic when you need your hands for other things - from driving to cooking.

All of these advantages are now amplified by my 2+ months & still counting pandemic related library closures.

There are disadvantages:
- I am using my phone which increases portability & eye strain (I need to buy a tablet or dedicated ereader.)
- I can only load 1 Audio book at a time because of the memory space that it requires.
- Many titles are out of the question because they were published 10+ years ago or their authors are against them.


message 5: by Selina (new)

Selina (literatelibrarian) | 2460 comments Do they take up a huge amount of space or memory? I suppose if you only reading one at time and not keeping it, it wouldnt matter but wonder about those people who BUY e-books, what are you really paying for?

Its like I kinda stopped buying music cos why should I when its all available for free anyway. I miss liner notes but thats about it.

I wouldnt really class audio book as e-book though.
I think e-books are ok for certain things like if you are studying at uni. The e-books textbooks meant the entire shortloan department of the library could close shop and the photocopier rooms would save paper...I remember having to photocopy reams and reams of readings and journal articles before things became available online.


message 6: by Koren (new)

Koren  (koren56) | 2936 comments Mod
If I cant wait to get a book from the library I will request both the real book version and the ebook and see which one comes first.

I will occasionally buy an e-book. I dont usually re-read books so I can just delete it when I'm done and not have to find a new home for it. Also nice to save a tree!

I dont know about audio books but I dont think regular e-books take up a lot of space on phones. I've heard people say they have 200+ books on their phones. I think I would feel overwhelmed if I had that many books to want to read on top of the real books I already have.

There are sites that will send daily emails with free and bargain books you can get from Amazon. I rarely find one I like but once in a while I do. Too fussy I guess. I think that's where the people get over 200 books.


Woman Reading It can be argued both ways for audio books. No, they're not ebooks because you can't read them with your eyes. But if ebooks are electronic versions of books, then audio books clearly are available in electronic form. The physical alternative is to use a pile of CDs.

I had mentioned my phone because my particular phone is more limited in memory space & in screen size than a dedicated ereader like a kindle or probably some other people's phones. And the audio books take up, at a guess, the equivalent memory of a handful of ebooks.


Lady ♥ Belleza (bella_foxx) | 216 comments All of the dedicated readers, Amazon, Kobo books etc have apps for your iPhone, iPad, or tablet. So you can get a kindle book for 99 c even if you don't have a kindle. There are also a ton of library apps to borrow from libraries.

My eye doctor said that reading on a dedicated devise is actually better for your eyes than reading a paper book. And I can say, when I actually find it easier to read on a devise than a book.


message 9: by Koren (new)

Koren  (koren56) | 2936 comments Mod
Lady ♥ Belleza wrote: "All of the dedicated readers, Amazon, Kobo books etc have apps for your iPhone, iPad, or tablet. So you can get a kindle book for 99 c even if you don't have a kindle. There are also a ton of libra..."

That's interesting what the eye doctor said because I know my eyes get more tired when I read on a device. I turned the brightness down and that helps a little.


message 10: by Selina (new)

Selina (literatelibrarian) | 2460 comments How do people pay 99c they must always get 1 cent change. Why cant they just charge $1?


message 11: by Koren (last edited May 22, 2020 12:04PM) (new)

Koren  (koren56) | 2936 comments Mod
Selina wrote: "How do people pay 99c they must always get 1 cent change. Why cant they just charge $1?"

It's on line so it just goes on your credit card. I think they do that so they can say it's under a dollar.


message 12: by Lady ♥ Belleza (last edited May 21, 2020 01:44PM) (new)

Lady ♥ Belleza (bella_foxx) | 216 comments Koren wrote: "That's interesting what the eye doctor said because I know my eyes get more tired when I read on a device. I turned the brightness down and that helps a little."

He was talking about dedicated devises, not a phone or tablet. The dedicated devises have less glare.


message 13: by Selina (new)

Selina (literatelibrarian) | 2460 comments what is the best dedicated device to buy if you wanted just one?

Do all e-books work across all platforms or only specific ones.
I downloaded a book on tree houses from the library as an e-book and it gave me two options, an adobe pdf or as an overdrive book, one worked and the other didnt.

It was interesting to flick through but Im not really used to reading a book like that. I cant take it anywhere if its on my laptop, a tablet is better. A phone is too small really.


message 14: by Julie (new)

Julie (julielill) | 1332 comments I love my iPad. I play games on it, I can download books on it plus it has a browser. I also was able to buy a keyboard that attaches to it. I can also do Zoom on it.


message 15: by Erin (new)

Erin  | 33 comments Physical books are my preferred way to read but I am starting to read more on my Kindle. I seem to read faster on Kindle, I don't know why.


message 16: by Koren (new)

Koren  (koren56) | 2936 comments Mod
Erin wrote: "Physical books are my preferred way to read but I am starting to read more on my Kindle. I seem to read faster on Kindle, I don't know why."

I scroll down instead of across which I think makes me read faster. It reminds me of a speed reading class I took in high school.


message 17: by Julie (new)

Julie McGue (julieryanmcgue) | 4 comments When I downsized out of the home in which I raised my family of four, I had to cull my books. I kept my favorite author and sold or donated the rest. Since then I use ebooks or listen to audiobooks when I walk.


message 18: by Selina (last edited Jun 06, 2020 01:26PM) (new)

Selina (literatelibrarian) | 2460 comments I looked up the price for a kindle in nz they cost from between $229 to $449. Out of reach for many people who wouldn't spend that much in one go on something. That's like half of most peoples minimum weekly wage.


message 19: by Selina (last edited Jun 16, 2020 10:37PM) (new)

Selina (literatelibrarian) | 2460 comments Has anyone listened to any good biographies as audiobooks?
Are the memoir/autobiographical ones always narrated by the authors themselves?

I've never really listened to many audiobooks at all but I might start looking into it more now there's more mp3 available. Changing CDs can be a bit of a hassle.

I can only remember two really The Other Side of Me by Sidney Sheldon and The Princess Diarist by Carrie Fisher that I listened to.
Both because print was unavailable at the time.

Both narrated by authors themselves and funnily enough both suffered Bipolar Disorder.


message 20: by Julie (new)

Julie (julielill) | 1332 comments I am not a big fan of audiobooks except if we go on vacation and are driving.


message 21: by Koren (new)

Koren  (koren56) | 2936 comments Mod
Selina wrote: "Has anyone listened to any good biographies as audiobooks?
Are the memoir/autobiographical ones always narrated by the authors themselves?

I've never really listened to many audiobooks at all but ..."


I've tried audiobooks but my mind wanders and then I have no idea what is happening. The only audiobook I remember listening to are a couple by Rick Bragg because I love his voice.


message 22: by Fishface (last edited Jun 17, 2020 08:11PM) (new)

Fishface | 1678 comments See, aside from loving the feel and smell of a book, I can take one or two with me anywhere in my bookbag and never worry that they will break if I sling my bag indifferently into the car or under my desk. And the batteries never go dry. With that said I do own a Kindle with some books uploaded, but after 2 years of owning it I still have a hard time even remembering it exists.

One thing I loathe about ebooks is that if they virtually go out of print, I will never be be to get it again, no way, nohow. I can always find a used copy of a real book.


message 23: by Selina (new)

Selina (literatelibrarian) | 2460 comments I remember listening to Shopaholic and Sister on a roadtrip on CD which was enjoyable and also You Can Heal Your Lifeonce on tape.

Language ones are useful although they can be repetitive. I think if I was travelling a lot on my job I would listen to them more.
The thing with audio books is you don't really know how long the chapters will be.

I tend to listen to podcasts of books on radio while I am working, I feel like when I read a book I like to go at my own pace, and if I don't quite understand something I go back and read it again.

e-books where its just swiping a page or scrolling I don't feel like I've really read a book its more like skimming it. I'll only read them if I can't find a print copy. It's like playing a video game of a real game, I suppose.


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