The F-word discussion

180 views
ARCHIVES > July - December 2020 - POLL WINNERS ANNOUNCED

Comments Showing 1-23 of 23 (23 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Anita (new)

Anita Fajita Pita (anitafajitapitareada) | 384 comments Mod
It's time to select our books for the last half of the year! Please bring us your feministically (I may have made that word up) inclined reading suggestions for both fiction and non-fiction! We will continue to alternate fiction and non-fiction with the top 3 books from each poll (which will go up after our 2 week nomination period in two separate fiction and non-fiction categories). We will follow the same general guidelines for nominations:

1-Written by a feminist and/or a woman
2-Plot looks at how gender, race, class, sexuality, ability/disability, ethnicity, nationality, etc. shape us and our views of the world
3-Spark conversation about social justice and gender equality
4-Have strong female characters

Please use the "add book/author" link to avoid any confusion, and be sure to include the name of the author with you nomination.

Please indicate fiction and non-fiction nominations so we can add them to the correct poll.

This is not a self promotion zone. Please feel free to self- promote your work in our blatant self promotion thread.

Make sure to check out our bookshelf for books we've already read as a group, although if it has been a few years since the group read it, we may consider a re-read. The bookshelf is also a great place to find ideas for nominations of books we haven't read.

It's been a heck of a year, let's read some good books! Nominations will close on May 31.


message 3: by Anita (last edited May 30, 2020 05:41PM) (new)

Anita Fajita Pita (anitafajitapitareada) | 384 comments Mod
A few fictions I think might be good here: *eta quick book summaries*

F*ckface: And Other Stories by Leah Hampton - a collection of short stoties set in Appalachia, looking at sex, class and economics.

Goldilocks by Laura Lam - a really great dystopian type (mostly in background setting) space journey sci-fi with an all female crew.

Kim Jiyoung, Born 1982 by Cho Nam-Joo - a South Korean fiction along the vein of The Women's Room, with emphasis on both social and governmental gender politics/policies.

*eta
I'd also like to add The Unsuitable by Molly Pohlig. It's a Victorian gothic, and a little spooky and haunting, but it really looks at the life of a Victorian girl suffering through severe depression because of the forces controlling her life. There is explicit self harm - I want to be clear about that - it is very descriptive and well written, and it could be traumatic or triggering for some people to read. I juggled with it because of that, but I think it's a great book.


message 7: by CD (new)

CD  | 104 comments Non-Fiction
Sharp: The Women Who Made an Art of Having an Opinion by Michelle Dean.

Madame Fourcade's Secret War: The Daring Young Woman Who Led France's Largest Spy Network Against Hitler by Lynne Olson

My Life in France by Julia Child

A partial disclaimer is that I've read all three of these book somewhat recently. All three are auto- or biographical in nature.

The first is a survey of a collection of women writers of the 20th Century that are fairly well known. Some of the details and links between many of them are not.

The second is a biography of a WWII resistance leader. What she did and stood for is unfathomable in the 21st Century in the West. Her being a woman probably helped to keep her alive because of the misogyny of all parties concerned. It is an outstanding piece of history. This should not be confused with several other recent books about women in espionage during WWII. They are mostly bad and a one or two are just storytelling masquerading as history.

Julia Child. Shouldn't need to say more.

One fiction work by a women, about a women, and some 'other' things that make for a goodread of a mystery is Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens


message 8: by Nia (new)

Nia  | 1 comments Non-fiction:
Why I’m no Longer talking to white people about race by Reni Eddo-Lodge (Has a very interesting chapter about feminism)
Feminists don’t wear pink curated by Scarlet Curtis- a collection of essays and stories of women in what feminism means to them

Fiction:
The Bloody Chamber and other stories by Angela Carter- fairytales retold in a gothic way with a feminist perspective


message 9: by Sophie (new)

Sophie Campbell (sophiecampbell_books) Non-Fiction
1. The Five: The Untold Lives of the Women Killed by Jack the Ripper

2. Breakfast at Bronzefield Breakfast at Bronzefield - A memoir of life inside the UK's largest female prison

3. Strange Antics: A History of Seduction

Fiction
4. Grotesque


message 10: by Samaira (last edited May 24, 2020 12:44PM) (new)

Samaira | 9 comments MaryAnn wrote: "Mother Teresa's Advice for Jilted Lovers"

Did you read the book? Can you please explain what is the Mother Teresa angle in the book? It is a proven fact that Mother Teresa was a morally bankrupt evangelist with a white saviour complex. I am surprised that the author chose to use Mother Teresa in her narrative and not sure how does this fit into a feminist narrative.


message 11: by Paige (new)

Paige | 7 comments Non-fiction:

I second the nomination for “The Five: the untold lives of the women killed by Jack The Ripper” by Hallie Rubenhold. Lots of research and detail in the slums of England and workhouse/doss houses during that fine. Fascinating.


message 12: by Tanja (new)

Tanja (phoenix27) | 1 comments Fiction: The Mercies

Deals with a community in Norway at the beginning of the 17th century which has lost most of their men in a storm. The women deal with this pretty good, but then foreign men come into their community and start witch trials.
The novel describes role models and how women deal with patriarchal values. It depicts oppression on several levels.


message 13: by Anita (new)

Anita Fajita Pita (anitafajitapitareada) | 384 comments Mod
I'm going to tentatively add Pelosi by Molly Ball for non-fiction, but this may be an additional reading opportunity offered to our group courtesy of the author and publisher, that we may just tack on during some upcoming month. More on this as things progress!


message 14: by Honore (new)

Honore | 78 comments Anita wrote: "I'm going to tentatively add Pelosi by Molly Ball for non-fiction, but this may be an additional reading opportunity offered to our group courtesy of the author an..."

:) :) :)


message 15: by Anita (new)

Anita Fajita Pita (anitafajitapitareada) | 384 comments Mod
These are great nominations, thank you everyone who chimed in. The polls should open up tomorrow and they will remain open through June 9th so please look for them and vote. I did a little moving - poetry to non-fiction, and there was a self promotion that didn't get added per group rules - Other than that, if I missed your nom or put in the wrong book please let me know.

We have a lot of selections so please take some time to read the blurbs and research accessibility for yourself if using libraries or online databases.

Remember, the top 3 books from each category will be alternated from July through December, starting with a fiction in July (we're reading the non-fiction A Room of One's Own by Virginia Woolf next for June).

I look forward to seeing what our next 6 months will look like.


message 16: by Anita (last edited Jul 27, 2020 02:19PM) (new)

Anita Fajita Pita (anitafajitapitareada) | 384 comments Mod
Poll Winners!

Non-Fiction Winners by vote (descending):
Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge (JULY)
The Five: The Untold Lives of the Women Killed by Jack the Ripper by Hallie Rubenhold (SEPTEMBER)
In the Dream House by Carmen Maria Machado(NOVEMBER)

Fiction winners by vote (descending):
Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens by Delia Owens(OCTOBER)
Kim Jiyoung, Born 1982 by Cho Nam-Joo(DECEMBER)
Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata (AUGUST)

If you have any input on the order of these books, now is the time and here is the place. We will read our first non-fiction in July, Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People about Race, followed by a (tbd) fiction in August, nf Sept., f Oct., nf Nov., and final fiction in Dec. Somewhere in there (August?) we will also be doing our group read of Pelosi by Molly Ball, with a follow up Q&A with the author.


message 17: by Honore (new)

Honore | 78 comments Oh these are such great books! Can't wait to discuss Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge next month! already have it on order from my local library!


message 18: by Anita (new)

Anita Fajita Pita (anitafajitapitareada) | 384 comments Mod
Sorry everyone, I just realized that I have two non-fictions scheduled in a row with Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race for next month when we're reading A Room of One's Own this month.

Does anyone have an issue with this or should we just proceed?


message 19: by Nick (new)

Nick Imrie (nickimrie) I don't mind at all. We might as well just proceed.


message 20: by Honore (new)

Honore | 78 comments Honore wrote: "Oh these are such great books! Can't wait to discuss Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge next month! already have it on order from my local library!"

:) I thought you might have had the back to back non-fiction to acknowledged the Black Lives Matter movement the United States is currently in and the need for white allies to educate themselves on racism.


message 21: by Anita (new)

Anita Fajita Pita (anitafajitapitareada) | 384 comments Mod
Yes, I definitely felt the urgency to read it sooner rather than later, and the polling made it clear that our members feel the same way.


message 22: by Hannah (new)

Hannah Are we reading convenience store woman in August? I'm going away for a month and have a lot of book packing to do!


message 23: by Anita (new)

Anita Fajita Pita (anitafajitapitareada) | 384 comments Mod
Hannah wrote: "Are we reading convenience store woman in August? I'm going away for a month and have a lot of book packing to do!"

Yes! Along with the additional non-fiction read of Pelosi. Safe travels to you Hannah!


back to top