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Archive > July Non-Fiction Poll up - Science

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message 1: by Louise, Group Founder (last edited May 23, 2020 02:14PM) (new)

Louise | 680 comments Mod
Hi all,

The theme for our July non-fiction read is Science. We're not too strict with definitions here so it could be straight science, a particular branch of science, or even a biography of a scientist - as long as you can justify it as a science book, and it's written by a woman we'll count it.

Criteria:
1. Book must be by a female author.
2. Must be a non-fiction.
3. Must be a science book (if not obvious how please explain how choice fits criteria)
3. No books that have already been group reads (check the group's bookshelf)
5. Do not nominate a book you have written or for which you are a publicist or marketer.
6. Consider availability - ie. if a book is available in the US and UK (at minimum), and in paperback and ebook formats, more members can participate than if not.

To Nominate:
1. Give both the title of the book and the author's name when nominating to avoid confusion. Please use the 'add book/author' button when nominating.
2. Indicate whether you are willing or not to lead discussion if your nomination is chosen.
3. Maximum - one nomination per member.

Nominations will close 23 May
The Sea Around Us by Rachel Carson - Samaira to lead
Pandemic: Tracking Contagions, from Cholera to Ebola and Beyond by Sonia Shah - Louise to lead
The Butchering Art: Joseph Lister's Quest to Transform the Grisly World of Victorian Medicine by Lindsey Fitzharris - Carol to lead
The Devil's Teeth: A True Story of Obsession and Survival Among America's Great White Sharks by Susan Casey
The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt's New World by Andrea Wulf - Story to lead


message 2: by Samaira (new)

Samaira | 34 comments 1. The Sea Around Us by Rachel Carson
2. I will be willing to lead the discussion if required.


message 3: by Carol (last edited May 16, 2020 10:40AM) (new)

Carol (carolfromnc) | 1803 comments Mod
I nominate The Butchering Art: Joseph Lister's Quest to Transform the Grisly World of Victorian Medicine by Lindsey Fitzharris. I can lead.

Science connection: focuses on nineteenth century surgery. from the GR blurb: "Focusing on the tumultuous period from 1850 to 1875, she introduces us to Lister and his contemporaries--some of them brilliant, some outright criminal--and takes us through the grimy medical schools and dreary hospitals where they learned their art, the deadhouses where they studied anatomy, and the graveyards they occasionally ransacked for cadavers. Eerie and illuminating, The Butchering Art celebrates the triumph of a visionary surgeon whose quest to unite science and medicine delivered us into the modern world."


message 5: by Jamie (new)

Jamie Zaccaria | 33 comments I nominate The Devil's Teeth: A True Story of Obsession and Survival Among America's Great White Sharks by Susan Casey.

The Devil's Teeth A True Story of Obsession and Survival Among America's Great White Sharks by Susan Casey

Susan Casey was in her living room when she first saw the great white sharks of the Farallon Islands, just twenty-seven miles off the coast of San Francisco.

In a matter of months, Casey went to the Farallon Islands to join Scot Anderson and Peter Pyle, the two biologists who bunk down during shark season each fall in the island's one habitable building. Two days later, she got her first glimpse of the famous, terrifying jaws up close and she was instantly hooked; her fascination soon yielded to obsession-and an invitation to return for a full season. But as Casey readied herself for the eight-week stint, she had no way of preparing for what she would find among the dangerous, forgotten islands that have banished every campaign for civilization in the past two hundred years.



message 6: by Story (new)

Story (storyheart) | 594 comments I nominate The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt's New World by Andrea Wulf

Alexander von Humboldt (1769 – 1859) was an intrepid explorer and the most famous scientist of his age. In North America, his name still graces four counties, thirteen towns, a river, parks, bays, lakes, and mountains. His restless life was packed with adventure and discovery, whether he was climbing the highest volcanoes in the world or racing through anthrax-infected Siberia or translating his research into bestselling publications that changed science and thinking. Among Humboldt’s most revolutionary ideas was a radical vision of nature, that it is a complex and interconnected global force that does not exist for the use of humankind alone.

I can lead.


message 7: by Louise, Group Founder (new)

Louise | 680 comments Mod
Poll now up HERE


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