The History Book Club discussion

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message 1: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jul 18, 2020 02:48AM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
This is a thread dedicated to the history, well known people and events associated with Mexico.

You may add books that take place in Mexico, are about Mexico, have a scene that takes place in Mexico or have events where Mexico is mentioned.

There is no self promotion on the History Book Club.

Introducing Mexico: (Lonely Planet)
Video: https://youtu.be/N4I4HsowHD8


message 2: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jul 18, 2020 12:21AM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
All the Pretty Horses (setting in Texas for a bit) and Mexico
FICTION

All the Pretty Horses (The Border Trilogy, #1) by Cormac McCarthy by Cormac McCarthy Cormac McCarthy

Synopsis:

All the Pretty Horses tells of young John Grady Cole, the last of a long line of Texas ranchers. Across the border Mexico beckons—beautiful and desolate, rugged and cruelly civilized. With two companions, he sets off on an idyllic, sometimes comic adventure, to a place where dreams are paid for in blood.

LITERARY AWARDS:
National Book Award for Fiction (1992), National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction (1992)


message 3: by Naomi V (new)

Naomi V (naomi_v) | 47 comments I am chagrined that I have little to no knowledge of the history of our nearest neighbors. Can anybody recommend a history of Mexico? I'm particularly interested in the revolution, but would like a good background of the history before, as well.


message 4: by Naomi V (new)

Naomi V (naomi_v) | 47 comments Naomi V wrote: "I am chagrined that I have little to no knowledge of the history of our nearest neighbors. Can anybody recommend a history of Mexico? I'm particularly interested in the revolution, but would like a..."

I realize now that I said THE revolution, but perhaps Mexico had more than one revolution. So, let's say history up to about 1900? 1950?


message 5: by Andrea (last edited Jul 17, 2020 03:04PM) (new)

Andrea Engle | 1058 comments Naomi, although it isn’t history, and although it isn’t new, to get an atmospheric feel for Mexico, may I recommend Graham Greene’s “The Power and the Glory?” Of course, Graham Greene was an Englishman. For an art history approach, any biography of Diego Rivera (who painted marvelous murals about Mexican history) or his wife Freda Kahlo would work just fine!
Regards,
Andrea

The Power and the Glory by Graham Greene by Graham Greene Graham Greene
Diego Rivera (no photo)
LEARNING FROM THE MASTERS--Self Portraits with Freda Kahlo by Brenda Lauw by Brenda Lauw (no photo)


message 6: by Naomi V (last edited Jul 17, 2020 07:28PM) (new)

Naomi V (naomi_v) | 47 comments Andrea wrote: "Naomi, although it isn’t history, and although it isn’t new, to get an atmospheric feel for Mexico, may I recommend Graham Greene’s “The Power and the Glory?” Of course, Graham Greene was an Engli..."

Thanks, Andrea. I'm somewhat familiar with Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera, but I'll look at their works more closely. I'll also take a look at The Power and the Glory. I've read Luis Alberto Urrea, but most of his stuff is more current although at least one of his books is based on actual history in 1889. I'm hoping to expand on that.

Thanks again.


message 7: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jul 18, 2020 12:20AM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Naomi V - we are building up our threads on Latin America and we will be adding more books soon - we are all volunteers so we do our best in our free time and it is all for the love of books and history.

Whenever mentioning any book we add three things just like Andrea did above so that the goodreads software can populate our group site properly. We add the bookcover, type in the word by, then we add the author's photo (if available) and then the author's link (which is the author's name in linkable text) - if the author does not have a photo - then we only add the link after the word by and then add (no photo) at the end. Andrea has both citations perfect.

When the citations are done perfectly, any member can also link to the book page, the author and/or see what the author looks like which is always fun. Additionally, if you look to the right - there is white space where the goodreads software adds all books mentioned on the thread for this particular topic as well as a listing of authors - if you see other topics beside the name of the author or the title of the book - if you click on that - you will see on what other threads and posts on our group site where the book or author has also been discussed. The citations cross reference the entire group site.

I will try to add some other books for you here on this thread.


message 8: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jul 18, 2020 12:29AM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
On Five Books - explorer, film-maker and writer, Hugh Thomson, picks the best books on Mexico, from the revolution in 1910, to the conquistadors, to gold mines, to the fatalism of Mexico.

Here is the interview - which I will add in the comment boxes below:

Your first book is Malcolm Lowry’s Under the Volcano.

There was a syndrome in the 1920s and 30s of British writers writing about Mexico – Lawrence, Waugh, Huxley, Greene. But Malcolm Lowry was one of the few English writers who actually spent quite a lot of time in the country. Graham Greene was only there for five weeks or so before writing his novel, but Lowry got under the skin of Mexico in a way that few of his contemporaries did.

Why?

I think it was the lure of the exotic and the unknown, of a different value system. Lawrence, for instance, was very taken by the idea of the ‘savage gods’. Mexico provided all that and was relatively easy to get to from the States. Lowry was attracted by the fatalism of Mexico, exacerbated by the huge quantities of alcohol he consumed. His main character, who was heavily autobiographical, is the Consul, a glorious wreck of a man trying to stitch himself together. It is a day in his life, or, rather, death, under the shadow of a volcano in a small Mexican town. His wife of the time, Jan Gabrial, published her own memoirs 50 or so years later about their turbulent life together, and called her book Inside the Volcano. I like that.

Under the Volcano by Malcolm Lowry by Malcolm Lowry Malcolm Lowry
NOTE - This is historical fiction - novel.

Source: Five Books


message 9: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jul 18, 2020 12:53AM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Five Books Interview continued:

Your next book is The Underdogs by Mariano Azuela.

Thomson continues: "I first read this when I was 16 or 17 and it made a strong impression on me. It’s a tough, picaresque novel of the Mexican revolution and of what it was like for the soldiers in the north. It’s a good account of how anarchic that revolution must have been and it still has a lot of verve and power, with images of troops spilling out of the trains, the Dorados, the ‘golden ones’, Pancho Villa’s cavalry. [Pancho Villa 1878-1923 was the colourful bandit-hero of the Mexican revolution].

This book is allied to Insurgent Mexico by the American journalist John Reed, his journalistic account of the Dorados of the north and the Mexican revolution. I find that people are often surprisingly ignorant about the Mexican revolution, given its importance. Lasting from 1910 to 1920, it gave Mexico its direction for much of the 20th century. It completely changed the country and was the first modern Latin-American revolution, with implications for the way the whole continent changed. Of course, it was anarchic and complicated, with many treacheries and reversals.

With Pancho Villa and his men, Azuela and Reed created an image of Mexican wildness that was to play down the line to countless Westerns and Sergio Leone movies – of amoral brutality and a wayward sentimentality; singing corridas and sharing your last tortilla, while laughing at how the brains of your enemy had splattered the ground.

The Underdogs A Novel of the Mexican Revolution by Mariano Azuela by Mariano Azuela Mariano Azuela
Note: This is an historical novel - historical fiction

Source: Five Books


message 10: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jul 18, 2020 12:42AM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Insurgent Mexico

Insurgent Mexico by John Reed by John Reed John Reed

Synopsis:

American journalist John 'Jack' Reed writes, on the scene, describing the Mexican Revolution of 1914. He gives an excellent realistic account of the Mexican Indians that have suffered under a brutal dictatorship. He writes about the time he spent in Northern Mexico with Pancho Villa and the war in the desert. It was hard for him as a Gringo as most Americans had only gone to Mexico to plunder the environment.

Read "The White Rose' by Bruno Traven and his other 'jungle' series books about the exploitation of Indian Mexicans

Many would say that Jack Reed took over from Jack London in his war reporting, since Jack had just died in 1914. Jack Reed's other famous book "Ten Days That Shook The World" is about the Red October (Boleshvik) Russian Revolution--the movie "Reds" by Warren Beatty is Jack Reed's story.


message 11: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jul 18, 2020 12:49AM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
The White Rose
Genre: Novel

La rosa blanca by B. Traven by B. Traven B. Traven

Synopsis:

A monumental confrontation in the 1920's between a ruthless robber baron owner of a USA oil company and a Indian Mexican farmer (steward/owner of the White Rose hacienda). A clash of two cultures, total exploitation for maximum profit vs. reverence for the land and what flows from it. As in this novel: We all are poor people, delight in the machine, in the airplane, the radio precisely because we have lost our attachment to the soil. This loss leaves us apathetic and distracted. That's why we need gasoline - to anesthetize us, to make us insensible of our loss, of our pain, gasoline that deludes us with speed so that we can flee all the quicker from ourselves and the needs of the heart. A Collector's Edition


message 12: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jul 18, 2020 12:55AM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Five Books Interview continued:

Hugh Thomas, The Conquest of Mexico.

This came out just at the time that I was making a film in Mexico and following the Spanish conquistador Hernando Cortes’s route from Veracruz to Mexico City (as it is now – then it was Tenochtitlán, the Aztec capital). Cortes reached Tenochtitlán in 1519. I used this book as my bible for retracing his route. Thomas makes clear what an achievement it was, first to dismantle his boats when he arrived and then to advance into this huge and powerful empire, knowing that the Aztecs practised human sacrifice. I mean, whatever you think of the Spaniards and the Conquest, they were undeniably brave. Thomas is good at using Aztec sources, chronicles and stories to show how it seemed from their side.

Did you do the actual journey?

I very much did the journey. Of course, now you can follow the route in many different ways and if you go by road you can do it in a day. But Cortes was being led by Indian guides who for all sorts of reasons didn’t want him to get there, so if there was a volcano they would go over it rather than around it, so to speak. You can see how the Spaniards got disorientated and worried; the route they took is still very wild.

Conquest Montezuma, Cortes and the Fall of Old Mexico by Hugh Thomas by Hugh Thomas Hugh Thomas

Source: Five Books


message 13: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Five Books Interview continued:

Now you’ve got Evelyn Waugh, Robbery Under Law: The Mexican Object-Lesson.

This is a good one. There was a big fashion in the 1930s for making the most of the trip by writing both a novel and a travel book about Mexico, as Greene and Lawrence did, but Waugh only wrote a travel book. It is little known and should be more widely read. It may be little known because of its awful title. The book has an odd genesis – it was a commission from the Pearson family who had oil holdings in Mexico that had been expropriated by the revolutionary government. They were so outraged that they paid Waugh to write a book about how arbitrary and unjust this was.

So, it’s an odd, sponsored book and while Waugh fulfils the brief, he also ranges far and wide across Mexico. He sees that its history is not as simple as ‘noble Indians and brutal Europeans’ and thinks Mexicans should celebrate their post-Columbian inheritance as much as their Aztec history. There is a fair amount of ‘dog eat dog’ in the Mexico Waugh describes – it was a tough place to live and work, and Waugh shows this with no sentimentality.

Robbery Under Law by Evelyn Waugh by Evelyn Waugh Evelyn Waugh

Source: Five Books


message 14: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jul 18, 2020 01:11AM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Five Books Interview continued:

Lastly, B Traven’s The Treasure of the Sierra Madre.

This was turned into the film starring Humphrey Bogart. It’s about a group of miners who go to the Sierra Madre because they’ve got wind of a fabulous gold mine. Of course, they get torn apart by jealousy, rivalry and encounters with bandits. The prose is hard-boiled, almost as though Raymond Chandler had written it; a real tough-man book, as you can imagine given that Humphrey Bogart was in the film. It’s by this mysterious writer B Traven. Nobody really knows who he was, though there have been plenty of theories. He clearly knew about working conditions in Mexico and how tough and inhuman they were. There is a famous episode when the federales, the police, are challenged because they have no badges and one of them says: ‘We don’t need no stinking badges.’

Traven sets up this tough, amoral Mexico which presaged the Hollywood Westerns and plays to the fantasy that if you go south of the border, there are no more laws. It’s long been endlessly exciting for writers to fantasise about and there’s a kind of American myth that it’s more elemental and wilder across the border and men can find – or lose – themselves there. All the Pretty Horses is a more recent example of the genre.

I’m not sure it ever was as wild as writers like to imagine. I also don’t want to paint too dark a picture of it, because it’s a wonderful country full of surprises, although it runs by its own rules. I suspect Mexico is altogether more complicated than English and American writers have given it credit for. There are cosmopolitan areas like Mexico City and then the desert and the jungle in the far south. That’s why for my last book, Tequila Oil, I drove in from Texas and carried on right to Yucatan in the jungle.

I wanted to see the whole thing.

The Treasure of the Sierra Madre by B. Traven by B. Traven B. Traven
Note: A novel - a bit like pulp fiction - hardboiled, film noir (Chandler like)

Source: Five Books


message 15: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jul 18, 2020 01:14AM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Tequila Oil

Tequila Oil by Hugh Thomson by Hugh Thomson Hugh Thomson

Synopsis:

'Try this tequila oil, Hugito. Just as the alcohol hits your stomach, the chilli will as well and blow it back into your brain. It will take your head off.' Explorer Hugh Thomson takes on Mexico.

It's 1979, Hugh Thomson is eighteen, far from home, with time to kill - and on his way to Mexico. When a stranger tells him there's money to be made by driving a car over the US border to sell on the black market in Central America, Hugh decides to give it a go.

Throwing himself on the mercy of Mexicans he meets or crashes into, Hugh and his Oldsmobile 98 journey through the region, meeting their fate in the slums of Belize City.

Thirty years on, Hugh returns - older but not necessarily wiser - to complete his journey.

Awards:

Stanford Dolman Travel Book of the Year Nominee (2010)


message 16: by Andrea (last edited Jul 18, 2020 01:25AM) (new)

Andrea Engle | 1058 comments Bentley, you’ve done it again. Whatever am I going to do about my TBR List? I’m adding the Lowry book immediately!
Regards,
Andrea

Under the Volcano by Malcolm Lowry by Malcolm Lowry Malcolm Lowry


message 17: by Andrea (new)

Andrea Engle | 1058 comments Sorry, Bentley, Pancho Villa murdered two of my relatives! I’m not going to read about him ever!
Regards,
Andrea


message 18: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jul 18, 2020 02:05AM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
That is too bad about your relatives Andrea - history is one of those things that brings up some memories for some - for example: World War One and Two also had many folks lost in battle or the Holocaust. Very sad times. There is no obligation to read any specific book; but we do post them on a variety of subjects and people. Many wonderful human beings died in the Holocaust and we read books like The Diary of Anne Frank or Hanns and Rudolf to learn from history and never forget what evils lurked in the world then and potentially now. The following books are not about Mexico.

The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank by Anne Frank Anne Frank

Hanns and Rudolf The True Story of the German Jew Who Tracked Down and Caught the Kommandant of Auschwitz by Thomas Harding by Thomas Harding Thomas Harding


message 19: by Andrea (last edited Jul 18, 2020 02:24AM) (new)

Andrea Engle | 1058 comments Oooohhh, Bentley, how I loved Anne Frank’s diary. I’m not familiar with the Thomas Harding book, but I am with the Thomas Hardy book. These books are not about Mexico.
Regards,
Andrea

Anne Frank The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank by Anne Frank Anne Frank
Hanns and Rudolf The German Jew and the Hunt for the Kommandant of Auschwitz by Thomas Harding by Thomas Harding Thomas Harding
Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy by Thomas Hardy Thomas Hardy


message 20: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
The Years With Laura Díaz
Genre: Historical Fiction; Novel

The Years with Laura Diaz by Carlos Fuentes by Carlos Fuentes Carlos Fuentes

Synopsis:

Fuentes's epic novel uses one woman's life and loves to sweep through 100 years of Mexican history. Laura Díaz – daughter, sister, wife, mother, lover – comes of age during the long, bloody Mexican revolution (1910-20). The execution of her half-brother Santiago (from one of four generations of Santiagos in the novel) by firing squad at the start of the revolution launches her political journey.

Laura has hardly a dull moment as Mexico heads towards becoming a modern nation. She witnesses, chronicles, discusses or participates in all the country's seminal political and cultural events of the 20th century, through to the early 1970s. Real-life luminaries such as artists Diego Rivera and his wife Frida Kahlo are also woven into the rich tapestry of Laura's life.

Fuentes's grand project encompasses Mexico's political upheavals, its union movement, the Spanish civil war, the Holocaust, McCarthyism and the massacre of students in Mexico City on the eve of the 1968 Olympics (Laura's grandson, Santiago, is one of the victims).

Its intelligence, emotional power and bold ambition make this a memorable book.

Diplomat, Harvard professor and one of Mexico's most famous writers and polemicists, Fuentes was often mentioned as a Nobel contender, but never won. He died in 2012.

Awards:

Premio letterario Giuseppe Acerbi (2004), Kiriyama Prize Nominee for Fiction (2000), International Dublin Literary Award Nominee for Shortlist (2002)


message 21: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Down the Rabbit Hole
Genre: Novel


Down the Rabbit Hole by Juan Pablo Villalobos by Juan Pablo Villalobos Juan Pablo Villalobos

Synopsis:

Tochtli lives in a palace. He loves hats, samurai, guillotines and dictionaries, and what he wants more than anything right now is a new pet for his private zoo: a pygmy hippopotamus from Liberia. But Tochtli is a child whose father is a drug baron on the verge of taking over a powerful cartel, and Tochtli is growing up in a luxury hideout that he shares with hit men, prostitutes, dealers, servants and the odd corrupt politician or two.

Down the Rabbit Hole, a masterful and darkly comic first novel, is the chronicle of a delirious journey to grant a child’s wish.

It has created quite a buzz in the Spanish-speaking world and beyond. It was published in Spain in 2010 (Anagrama) and has already been translated into Portuguese, French, Italian, German, Romanian, Dutch and English.

Every writer should attempt to go beyond the limits of possible experience. It sounds nice: really I just copied it from the dictionary. The dictionary also says that to transcend is to find out something that is hidden. That is: reality on its own is worth nothing; we have to transform it into culture.


message 22: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Mexico: Democracy Interrupted

Mexico Democracy Interrupted by Jo Tuckman by Jo Tuckman (no photo)

Synopsis:

An up-to-date portrait of Mexico since 2000, with new insights into the nation's problematic democracy and violent drug wars

In 2000, Mexico's long invincible Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) lost the presidential election to Vicente Fox of the National Action Party (PAN). The ensuing changeover—after 71 years of PRI dominance—was hailed as the beginning of a new era of hope for Mexico. Yet the promises of the PAN victory were not consolidated. In this vivid account of Mexico's recent history, a journalist with extensive reporting experience investigates the nation's young democracy, its shortcomings and achievements, and why the PRI is favored to retake the presidency in 2012.

Jo Tuckman reports on the murky, terrifying world of Mexico's drug wars, the counterproductive government strategy, and the impact of U.S. policies. She describes the reluctance and inability of politicians to seriously tackle rampant corruption, environmental degradation, pervasive poverty, and acute inequality. To make matters worse, the influence of non-elected interest groups has grown and public trust in almost all institutions—including the Catholic church—is fading. The pressure valve once presented by emigration is also closing. Even so, there are positive signs: the critical media cannot be easily controlled, and small but determined citizen groups notch up significant, if partial, victories for accountability. While Mexico faces complex challenges that can often seem insurmountable, Tuckman concludes, the unflagging vitality and imagination of many in Mexico inspire hope for a better future.

The Guardian's Review:

A well-informed overview of Mexico today, in which Tuckman argues that the country missed a chance to fully embrace democracy after the oxymoronic Institutional Revolutionary party (PRI) was voted out in 2000 after 70 years in power (it has since returned).

The rightwing National Action party (PAN), in its 12 years of rule, failed to deliver on the hopes it had raised for more transparent and participatory governance, beyond political plurality and generally free and fair elections.

Tuckman investigates the key dimensions of Mexican life and the challenges the country faces: a violent drugs war (and the US role in it); a flawed judicial system and much-abused laws; rampant corruption; poverty and extreme inequality; racism; and environmental concerns. She also examines the infighting that has stymied the ambitions of the left, and the role played by the Catholic church and religion.

History, personal stories and political analysis are interwoven to reveal what makes this fascinating and diverse country tick.

Despite some seemingly intractable problems, she sees reasons to be optimistic, with brave and energetic citizens, along with sections of the media, stepping up to fight for a better future.

Tuckman, the Guardian's Mexico correspondent, has been living in, and reporting on, the country for more than 10 years.


message 23: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
On the Plain of Snakes: A Mexican Journey

On the Plain of Snakes A Mexican Journey by Paul Theroux by Paul Theroux Paul Theroux

Synopsis:

Legendary travel writer Paul Theroux drives the entire length of the US–Mexico border, then goes deep into the hinterland, on the back roads of Chiapas and Oaxaca, to uncover the rich, layered world behind today’s brutal headlines.

Paul Theroux has spent his life crisscrossing the globe in search of the histories and peoples that give life to the places they call home. Now, as immigration debates boil around the world, Theroux has set out to explore a country key to understanding our current discourse: Mexico. Just south of the Arizona border, in the desert region of Sonora, he finds a place brimming with vitality, yet visibly marked by both the US Border Patrol looming to the north and mounting discord from within. With the same humanizing sensibility he employed in Deep South, Theroux stops to talk with residents, visits Zapotec mill workers in the highlands, and attends a Zapatista party meeting, communing with people of all stripes who remain south of the border even as their families brave the journey north.

From the writer praised for his “curiosity and affection for humanity in all its forms” (New York Times Book Review), On the Plain of Snakes is an exploration of a region in conflict.


message 24: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jul 18, 2020 03:03AM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Mexico City Travel Guide



Youtube Video by Attache - Our Mexico City Travel Guide! This wonderful city is truly the star of one our best episodes ever.

I have never fallen in love with a city quite as quickly as I fell in love with Mexico City. The Mexican capital is everything I want in a city; sprawling, loud, exciting, creative, friendly, and absolutely delicious.

Our Mexico City guide is one of our longest episodes ever and I feel every second is justified as this city has so much to offer. The food section alone is packed full of deliciousness - don't watch on an empty stomach!

Link: https://youtu.be/q80bY-WvEQE


message 25: by Andrea (last edited Jul 18, 2020 07:42AM) (new)

Andrea Engle | 1058 comments My Goodness, Bentley, you certainly have been busy! That Fuentes novel sounds interesting, although I prefer non-fiction history to historical fiction when I’m not familiar with an author. My TBR List thanks you, but I do so somewhat grudgingly — my TBR List is embarrassingly lengthy!
Regards,
Andrea

The Years with Laura Diaz by Carlos Fuentes by Carlos Fuentes Carlos Fuentes


message 26: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Glad to be of assistance (smile).


message 27: by Andrea (last edited Jul 18, 2020 02:00PM) (new)

Andrea Engle | 1058 comments Bentley, “Down the Rabbit Hole” also sounds interesting. Is it anything like “American Dirt?”
Regards,
Andrea

Down the Rabbit Hole by Juan Pablo Villalobos by Juan Pablo Villalobos Juan Pablo Villalobos
American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins by Jeanine Cummins Jeanine Cummins


message 28: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Not sure about that question. Maybe one of the other members may be able to respond.


message 29: by Lorna, Assisting Moderator (T) - SCOTUS - Civil Rights (new)

Lorna | 1864 comments Mod
Andrea, while I can't speak to the books you ask about, I have read the books by Paul Theroux and Malcom Lowry. They are both most excellent and I think give you an endurable piece of Mexico in their grittiness and beauty and enduring heritage of this beautiful country. And I must add that Carlos Fuentes is one of the most beloved Latin American novelists, and certainly one of my favorites. I don't think you can go wrong with one of his most beautiful books.

On the Plain of Snakes A Mexican Journey by Paul Theroux by Paul Theroux Paul Theroux
Under the Volcano by Malcolm Lowry by Malcolm Lowry Malcolm Lowry
The Years with Laura Diaz by Carlos Fuentes by Carlos Fuentes Carlos Fuentes


message 30: by Andrea (last edited Jul 19, 2020 01:04AM) (new)

Andrea Engle | 1058 comments Lorna, I utterly adore Paul Theroux!!! Thank you for the recommendation! I’ll let you know when my TBR List breaks one thousand ... the only Lowry I think I know is the British artist (you know the one from the industrial Midlands).
Regards,
Andrea

On the Plain of Snakes A Mexican Journey by Paul Theroux by Paul Theroux Paul Theroux
L.S. Lowry A Life by Shelley Rohde by Shelley Rohde (no photo)


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