Support for Indie Authors discussion

90 views
Marketing Tactics > Professional Promotional and Marketing Assistance

Comments Showing 1-18 of 18 (18 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by [deleted user] (new)

I have tried several marketing initiatives on my own with little to no sells. I am considering hiring a professional company to help me. Has anyone worked with Spark? If so, can you let me know what you thought of the services you opted for? If anyone has used other companies, can you recommend a good one?


message 2: by J.B. (new)

J.B. (goodreadscomjbmorrisauthor) | 23 comments check out
lauren.ireadbooktours@gmail.com

JB Morris Author


message 3: by Eileen (new)

Eileen Iciek | 129 comments J.B. wrote: "check out
lauren.ireadbooktours@gmail.com

JB Morris Author"


Is this for blog tours?

I have done two, one about 4 years ago, one a year and a half ago. I wasn't thrilled with the first one, but it was ok. At least I got a few reviews from it. The second one was really disappointing. No reviews resulted from it and I don't think I got anything much of value from it. I don't think any of the bloggers even read the book, just popped a brief comment or maybe an interview with me in their newsletter. I have also heard that blog tours are not as popular as they used to be.

If you're an indie writer, you're also an indie marketer. Check out David Gaughran's books on it, and a few others. Also, there are Facebook groups that discuss marketing options. One writer I know of says that indie writers need to spend 60% of their time marketing and 40% writing. Probably true.


message 4: by J.B. (new)

J.B. (goodreadscomjbmorrisauthor) | 23 comments This is a blog tour. I got eight reviews.
JB Morris Author


message 5: by N.M. (new)

N.M. (nmroger) | 2 comments I mostly go by social media marketing (posting in groups and some times paid promotions). The results do not always cover the cost of advertising, but I guess being an indie author that is a phase you should expect. I don't look at the figures so often. I write good stories and build a brand. It takes just one influential reader or reviewer to stumble on your book and spark your career.


message 6: by Wanjiru (new)

Wanjiru Warama (wanjiruwarama) | 198 comments N. wrote: "I mostly go by social media marketing (posting in groups and some times paid promotions). The results do not always cover the cost of advertising, but I guess being an indie author that is a phase ..."

I like that N. That's what I have been waiting for - for that one special reader to spark my leadership.


message 7: by Tony (new)

Tony Nash | 29 comments Aren't we all? Strangely, I've just written the tenth in a series set in Norway, with a Norwegian cop - Sheriff Cnut - and they are the only books that I am selling (I have 42 published), and all in Australia, not in the UK. I can't understand it, but am still hoping that one of those readers will be a TV producer, LOL. Good luck to you.


message 8: by Eileen (new)

Eileen Iciek | 129 comments What kind of books do you write? I write historical fiction and non-fiction in the Byzantine era. I have found Facebook groups that share my Byzantine interest. I started participating in them just because my esoteric interest was not one I shared with many people in my immediate vicinity (unlike, say, basketball, football, reality TV). It can get a little lonely! I participated in them for a while before mentioning that I write about the Byzantines and I've found a lot of my readers in these groups.

Then there are AMS ads. It took a while for me to figure out what keywords were all about, but once I did I started seeing sales.

Trial and error. That's a lot about getting sales. That, and marketing!


message 9: by Haru (new)

Haru Ichiban | 255 comments Tracey, I just checked your profile. Memoirs/biographies are kind of hard to sell unless you're a famous person to start with. Plus, you have only one book and, my opinion, the title is long and doesn't convey any emotion. Your bio is too drawn-out as well. Try to inject more enthusiasm and/or drama.

I'm really sorry, it's not what you asked, but I thought it could help.


message 10: by B.A. (new)

B.A. A. Mealer | 843 comments As one person said, you are an indie author which means you need to become and indie marketer. Gaughran is good, to is Tim Grahl who is a professional marketer. He offers a class in marketing which includes some publicity. Publicity is a way of getting your name out there. Over time, it will help sell your books by name recognition. It is an ongoing, long term strategy and you don't need to hire someone to do it for you.

Marketing in the act of making connections with your readers. You can do your own outreach by learning about the bloggers who specialize in your genre. By making personal connections, you will find that you get better results.

The last part is advertising. This will most likely be one of your bigger costs. The above mentioned people will tell you how to do ads and when to do them.

There is a learning curve to all of this just like there is to writing. It takes time but if you put in the time, you can sell books. The time for doing all of the above is approximately 2 hours a week to start off. Most of that will be spent in research for bloggers, keywords, genre niche, etc. I'll admit to still learning and working on my marketing. I ended up selling over 150 books in two weeks and I'm still getting sales and visitors to my website. As I've mentioned before, having an email list is your best sales tool. They are your fans. The other thing is that you need to have more than one book out there.


message 11: by Viola (new)

Viola Russell | 36 comments Eileen wrote: "What kind of books do you write? I write historical fiction and non-fiction in the Byzantine era. I have found Facebook groups that share my Byzantine interest. I started participating in them just..."

What's an AMS ad?


message 12: by Viola (new)

Viola Russell | 36 comments Has anyone tried Twitter ads? For that matter, the Good Reads ads? And--has anyone heard of Book Tweep?


message 13: by B.A. (new)

B.A. A. Mealer | 843 comments AMS ads are Amazon ads. Twitter isn't the best for selling. David sells is one of the better ones from what others say. Goodread....hate to say it, not so good from what others have said. I've never heard of Book Tweep.


message 14: by Eileen (new)

Eileen Iciek | 129 comments Viola wrote: "Eileen wrote: "What kind of books do you write? I write historical fiction and non-fiction in the Byzantine era. I have found Facebook groups that share my Byzantine interest. I started participati..."

I don't do Twitter ads, but I have occasionally hired a company that tweets for me for a period of time. I've heard of Book Tweep but that's about it. I did try Goodreads ads a few years back and got almost no clicks. It wasn't worth it. Maybe it works for big names. If you want to post in Twitter and you have a following on a specific topic (mine is Byzantine history) you can create your own posting using Canva and that can work as an ad. Canva is free for a lot of what they offer, but the really good images have to be paid for.

The best way I've found to get sales is with AMS ads on Amazon. It isn't cheap but the ads are right there in front of people who love to read and read books on your particular subject. Most of the other advertising options can be pretty scattershot.


message 15: by T.S. (new)

T.S. Adrian (shadyia) | 11 comments Hello all!

I am looking for a professional book promotion company or individual. I have four books in the same series published (adult sword fantasy) and my sales are dismal. I wish to get the word out.

Any ideas?


message 16: by Reyna (new)

Reyna Favis (reynafavis) | 11 comments Try DIY first, provided you already have some good reviews for your books. To get started, I'd advise running a promotion on Book Barbarian (perfect for your genre) or a similar book promotion site. I've had good luck there with supernatural fantasy. Discount your first book to $0.99 and use it for your ad. Watch your metrics for read through. A week after your campaign, ask the book promotion site to tell you how many impressions you got and your click-through rate. This will help you with future campaigns and ads.


message 17: by B.A. (last edited Jul 12, 2020 07:47AM) (new)

B.A. A. Mealer | 843 comments You can check with Tim Grahl but unless you have certain criteria, he may advise you to try elsewhere...he is expensive since promotion and book marketing is his profession.

I'd advise learning to DIY. That means how to use Amazon ads, FB ads. Bookbub and other promotion site that fit your genre. If you don't have an email list, start building that through Prolificworks and Author AXP. If you use Convert Kit, they have free promo offers that you can join. Also Nick Stephenson if you have his course in marketing had a promotion site on FB..

Warning, there are a lot of "promotional sites" out there, so be very, very wary of them. They charge $500 to $5000 to promote your book. From what I've heard, you don't get enough sales to make it worth the money. I had good luck with running some Amazon ads and then stacking a few promotions on my latest release. I'm still getting traffic to my website from the Ads. I didn't get tons of sales but then again, I'm an unknown but I do know that you need to do some ads and promotions and is does cost but you can do it for under $200 for a launch and $50 a month for ads unless you are using Bookbub. They are more expensive.


message 18: by Julie (new)

Julie Morton (juliem69) Has anyone tried the Written Word, book launch promo? If so, did it work?


back to top