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#17: Rainbow Riddle > Chjapter 1: The Rainbow Riddle - Summary

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William Land (williamland) | 1235 comments Mod
Chapter 1: Happy is the Bride

This story starts with Judy’s wedding day. Judy hears her mother calling to see if she is awake. Judy had been awake for quite awhile but was waiting for it to be time to get up. The double wedding is to be at 4:00 that afternoon. “I'm awake. Wide awake and dreaming,” she added, as she pushed both feet into pink satin mules. They were trimmed in white rabbit’s fur and Blackberry, Judy’s cat, made a kitten like dive for them as his mistress wiggled her toes inside. “You never grow up, do you?” she scolded the cat. “I wonder if I will, now that I am to become Mrs. Peter Dobbs.” “Sounds impressive, doesn't it? How will it seem, Sis, to be the wife of a G-man?” Judy whirled to see Horace in the doorway. Horace was fully dressed with a broad grin and a rose in his lapel. “I've been wondering about that myself,” Judy admitted, a shadow crossing her face. She had tried not to think about the three months of waiting until Peter should be finished with his course at the FBI Academy. Even then he had no assurance that his first assignment would give him any time at home. Horace guesses that it will be pretty lonesome for Judy while Peter is away. He says Washington but Judy corrects him that it is Quantico, about 50 miles or so from Washington, DC. Horace’s eyes were aglow with enthusiasm, “Boy, wouldn't you love to tour FBI headquarters with him?” “I'm not at all sure that I would,” Judy replied, still with dignity. “The FBI doesn't want a bunch of wives trailing around after their special agents. A G-man is supposed to be interested in one thing, the suppression of crime. His other interests can wait. Besides, it’s going to give me a wonderful chance to fix up the house and have everything perfect by the time Peter comes home. Luckily he doesn't have to leave until next week.”

Horace tells Judy that at least she has sunshine for her wedding day. Judy looked out her window and saw that the sun was shining gloriously. Every bird in the trees seemed to be singing the old rhyme:
“If she wears something old, something new,
Something borrowed, something blue,
Happy is the bride that the sun shines on..”
Judy has the old wedding veil that was worn by Peter’s grandmother, the new dress that she had recently bought in New York City. She was carrying blue forget-me-nots in her bouquet and was intending to wear a borrowed locket. (From Pauline although it doesn't mention that here)

Judy brushed each separate auburn curl and then slipped on a net to hold the curls in place. Her hair, like everything else, must be perfect for the wedding. Lorraine’s hair she knew, would be a golden halo. Arthur Farringdon-Pett would be an ideal groom, tall dignified and handsome. He wouldn't make a mistake. Judy had known Arthur long enough to realize that. But Peter…She had to smile when she thought of Peter with his sandy stick-up hair and pug nose. He'd be like a little boy walking up on stage to say his first piece. “He'll do something wrong. I know he will, but I'll love him for it.“ she thought fondly.

She did love Peter. Now at last, she was sure of it. She tightened up when she thought of him with the FBI facing real danger. She thought of the lurid pictures on magazine covers showing G-men as grim faced men with guns blazing. But Peter had described a special agent as a sort of lawyer whose job was simply to find facts that could be presented when the case, whatever it was, finally came before the Federal Court. As Peter’s secretary in the little Roulsville law office, Judy had been able to help him with his legal cases. As his wife…she wondered? What was a G-man’s wife supposed to be except be patient.? Judy knew she was not patient. Judy looked at her carefully curled hair, she began to wonder if Peter wouldn't like it better if it were fluffed out more naturally. Impulsively she pulled off the net and ran downstairs.

Dr and Mrs. Bolton wished Judy a Happy Wedding Day and Judy answered, “Oh, it is a happy day, isn't it? The sun is shining and the birds are singing just as if they knew. Even Blackberry acts like a kitten this morning. Nothing must go wrong. Why am I afraid that something will, Mother? Are all brides a little bit afraid?” Her parents smiled at each other. Judy couldn't help noticing the look that passed between them. It made them both seem suddenly very young. Mrs Bolton tells her that she was afraid and that it is natural. That she had been a daughter of their house and now she was going to be the wife of another house. Judy was thoughtful about a home being a responsibility and said she was happy that it was Grandmother Smeed’s house first and that her grandmother wanted her to have it. She reminded her mother that Mrs Bolton had said she thought of it as a sort of wedding gift.

Horace indicates the wedding gifts and tells Judy she has more to open. Judy says she will save the big one addressed to Mr. & Mrs. Dobbs until Peter is with her and will open the others after breakfast. As they are going into the dining room for breakfast, they hear a loud rumbling noise. Judy is afraid that it is thunder but Dr Bolton thinks it is dynamite in the stone quarry up the hill. Something in connection with the glass plant. They are worried that it will make the wedding cake, which is in the oven, fall. It is fine though. Mrs. Bolton said that she wouldn’t have left the cake until the last minute but she wanted it to be freshly made and decorated at home. She doesn’t want Judy to see the cake until they come back for the reception. ‘I do think it is nice, Judy girl, to have your reception in your own home.” Judy agreed. Lorraine’s family had planned an elaborate double wedding on the wide lawn that used to belong to the Farringdon-Pett estate. It was now part of the Lee property although the house faced on another street. Afterwards there would be separate receptions. Judy’s reception might not be as fashionable as Lorraine’s, but there would be a supper table banked with flowers and, of course, the wedding cake.

Preparations for the wedding supper were already going on in the kitchen under Sarah‘s expert direction. The kindhearted colored woman came in to clean by the day and stayed on to help on special occasions. Because today was especially special, her daughter Elitha had come with her. Ordinarily Elitha worked in the Yellow Bowl Tearoom. It seemed odd to have a waitress serving breakfast in the unpretentious Bolton dining room.

Judy is really too excited to eat, she is thinking of the wedding. It is going to be beautiful with the bridesmaids in the colors of the rainbow. It had been Judy’s idea to dress the bridesmaids in the colors of the rainbow. It had come to her suddenly while Judy & Peter were eating at the Yellow Bowl tearoom. “Oh I know. The colors of the rainbow!” Judy had exclaimed enthusiastically in such a loud voice that several strangers, to Judy’s embarrassment, had turned to look at her. Naturally they could not know that she was talking about the dresses for her bridesmaid to wear. Honey was to be Judy’s maid of honor while Lois was to be Lorraine’s. At the rehearsal, other people stood in for Judy & Lorraine. Lorraine mentioned that it was bad luck for the bride to do it. Judy says that bad luck follows her wherever she goes. She was thinking of losing her wedding dress. But she is determined to not think of mysteries on her wedding day. When her dad offers her a penny for her thoughts. Judy laughs and says they aren’t worth it and what does any girl think on her wedding? Dr Bolton tells her that she isn’t “any girl” and Judy admits that she is going to ignore any mysteries today. Dr Boltons eyes twinkled thinking how hard that would be for Judy. As soon as they finished breakfast, food, flowers and out of town relatives started to arrive. Roxy had just arrived when Dr Bolton was called out to see Rosalie Brady. While Dr Bolton is gone, they decorate the house with cherry branches; when he returns he has the bad news that Rosalie had chicken pox. Judy is upset as Rosalie was to be one of the flower girls and it won't look right to have 2 brides and one flower girl. Carol Scott is away at camp and the only other girl she would like is Roberta. Dr Bolton asks who is Roberta and Judy reminds him that she is the girl that she met in Connecticut. But that Roberta is too far away and her cross old aunt would never let her come. “Well,” Horace replied, appearing at the living room door with a small, golden haired, brown eyed girl of about eight years , holding fast to his hand, “I haven't met your friend from Connecticut , but this little girl says her name is Roberta. I was just about to tell you that she arrived when I heard you mention her name.”

This has been very long, but Judy doesn't get married every day so I thought you would all like the details. There are some fashion details that I love like the pink mules trimmed in white rabbit fur. I can just picture them although they seem a little glamorous for Judy. I also liked the mention of the net. Hair routines were so different then, but you can still find mules. A lot of the hair styles in 1946 were pretty extravagant, needing 'rats' and other devices to add height and fullness. I had never heard the last line of the something old, something new saying. Did everyone else know that? My daughter is getting married in August and when we were at the bridal shop last fall looking at bridesmaid dresses I mentioned a rainbow wedding, my daughter and the attendant, (who was my daughter’s age) looked at me like I was from another planet. I have always loved the idea. I was in a rainbow wedding, I wore pink for my sister-in-laws wedding when I was the maid of honor. I had forgotten that it was rainbow until just now. I need to look at her wedding pictures again. I think it is odd that Horace is already for the wedding with a rose in his lapel already since it is just morning. I liked the mention of forget-me-nots. I don't think I really knew what they were until last summer. My neighbor had them and I loved them. She divided hers and brought over and planted 3 in my garden. Unfortunately my daughter’s finance was weeding for me and pulled them all out. I didn't say a word to him because he didn't know and Molly assures me that she will do it again next spring.

Times and weddings have changed so much. I can't imagine making the wedding cake for my daughter, much less making it that morning when the reception was going to be at my house. As I read this chapter, I thought of Best Years of Our Lives and Father of the Bride (the real version with Spencer Tracy and Elizabeth Taylor. Both movies that had the wedding or part of wedding at home and both made around the time this was written.. I love those 2 movies.

We can see that Judy has a little more to worry about than many brides. Peter ’s new job is a major change in their life. She had always been able to help him, or actually to have him help her, but now his work will be secretive and more dangerous. I think the biggest change is that instead of being his own boss with the ability to do what he thinks is best when he thinks it is best, he is going to have to follow strict orders. It is going to be a huge change for them. Much more so than just starting to live together in their own house, starting a new life together in their old positions. It also puts Judy out of a job since the law office will close, although at that time, the expectations might have been for her to quit anyway, but I don't see Judy doing that. It seemed odd that Judy wouldn't want a tour of FBI headquarters. Her whole attitude about the government not wanting wives around seemed very strange for Judy. I would think that she would have been dying to know everything that was going to go on.


William Land (williamland) | 1235 comments Mod
I truly enjoyed this summary and Faye's comments. (Note: Faye is the person who wrote this summary).

I can't imagine being a Judy Bolton fan and waiting three years between the end of the last book and the beginning of this one. We fans know the background story, but I can imagine that age appropriate readers were searching for this book in stores! Of course, being wartime, they may have noticed that many of their favourite series were not available; the Dana Girls is another one which didn't produce new titles during some of the war years.

I, too, only remember the first lines of this prose:
“If she wears something old, something new,
Something borrowed, something blue,
Happy is the bride that the sun shines on..”
I didn't know the last one.

I once worked with an Englishwoman who married an Italian man. She told me Italian brides think it is good luck if it rains on their wedding day. I never found out why!

I like hearing that Judy definitely loves Peter. They are a very compatible couple. She and Arthur were much too different to be a successful couple; either engaged or married!


Rebekah (rebroxanna) | 604 comments I too loved reading Faye's charming comments! And I agree that those pink mules didn't sound like Judy.

I had my reception at my parents' home. She didn't bake the cake, but she did everything else. We had a buffet-style late lunch. Unfortunately, she was stuck in the kitchen for most of the reception. if I had it to do over again, I would have spent the money to have it catered. But we were trying to save money.


message 4: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 156 comments I thought that the Bolton idea of a wedding rather corny, especially baking your own wedding cake. I'm just surprised that the Lees & the Boltons had even agreed to a double wedding. I'm assuming that Lorraine had her own cake? Since the two families appear to be so dissimilar, I suppose that separate receptions makes sense.


message 5: by Rachelle (new) - added it

Rachelle | 74 comments Mod
Judy's house was the dividing line between the mill workers and others. Lorraine and Lois are in a higher "class." I wonder how much the plot had in having two separate receptions. Though I am not a writer, I know mystery writers want certain things to happen and need a way to get them to do so. Some of the other events would be harder to have at a single reception. (Trying to avoid saying too much.)


William Land (williamland) | 1235 comments Mod
Kathleen wrote: << ... Since the two families appear to be so dissimilar, I suppose that separate receptions makes sense.>>

I think this is a plausible reason behind the two receptions. At Judy's reception, the only close friends who would be missing are Lois and Arthur. The others (the girls of the uptown crowd) are friendly with Judy, but they seem to be much closer to Lorraine and Lois.

I can't imagine Mr. and Mrs. Lee, a couple of whom I believe are very snobbish, would want to have the mill girls from the poorer neighbourhood attending their cherished daughter's wedding reception.


message 7: by Beverly (new)

Beverly | 996 comments Rachelle wrote: "I know mystery writers want certain things to happen and need a way to get them to do so. Some of the other events would be harder to have at a single reception. (Trying to avoid saying too much.."

Exactly, Rachelle.The events of the reception would not have worked well if the Lee family had been present. Can you imagine Lorraine's reaction to the events at the reception? Also, the hill across the street from Judy's house was important.


J. Michael | 130 comments Kathleen wrote: "I thought that the Bolton idea of a wedding rather corny, especially baking your own wedding cake."

What ...? But, but, but when I was married, we made our own wedding cake! It was a romantic, intimate thing to do. We were married in a sacred Native American shrine that is located in an ancient cave in Eureka Springs, Arkansas. It was a simple ceremony ... we wrote our own vows, too. Afterwards, we were going to eat at a nice restaurant, but we got lost, and ended up at a cafe that had received rave reviews on Google. And then we made the two-hour trip home and had a piece of our homemade wedding cake for dessert. We wrapped up two generous slices of cake and put them in the freezer, to be enjoyed at some later date. I haven't looked at them in years ... I kind of dread thinking of what they might look and taste like after all this time!


message 9: by Cindy (new)

Cindy Sweet | 186 comments So you were married recently enough to have google reviews! No dream of such a thing 40 years ago


message 10: by Beverly (new)

Beverly | 996 comments Cindy wrote: "So you were married recently enough to have google reviews! No dream of such a thing 40 years ago"

I thought the same, Cindy. No google reviews for me. 37 years ago in July. I love homemade cake. My wedding cake was homemade in that the woman who made it had a home business and I think baked it in her home.


message 11: by Beverly (new)

Beverly | 996 comments J. Michael wrote: "We were married in a sacred Native American shrine that is located in an ancient cave in Eureka Springs, Arkansas."

Was the cave cold? What did you wear?



message 12: by Faye (new)

Faye Kisker | 382 comments My wedding cake was made in a home by my mother's friend. Her friend's name was Margaret, and she and her sister Marie lived with their mother. Just the three grown ladies. The mom was a seamstress and she made my gown. Marie worked an office job and Margaret made cakes and babysat occasionally. Margaret made the cake as my wedding gift and her mom made my veil for my wedding gift. My mom used to drive Margaret to Canada every so often so she could stock up on margarine. At the time, Canada still had farmer protection laws in place and margarine had to be sold white with a food coloring packet that the consumer would blend into the white margarine. She needed white margarine so the frosting would be pure white. It was a 15 minute drive over the Peace Bridge to a store.
Another thing ~ Margaret and Marie seemed ancient to me at the time. When I was over for a fitting, Marie pulled into the driveway wearing a felt hat with a feather in it like on the cover of the Nancy Drew book Tapping Heels. Much as I loved the book, I was in hysterics when I told my sister about it. No one wore hats like that in the 1970's. I was a brat about it that's for sure. At 20 years old, I should have been more mature, shouldn't I?


message 13: by Faye (new)

Faye Kisker | 382 comments Beverly wrote: "J. Michael wrote: "We were married in a sacred Native American shrine that is located in an ancient cave in Eureka Springs, Arkansas."

Was the cave cold? What did you wear?"


I would really like to go to Eureka Springs, but I am not a cave person. But I would stand outside and wave a bubble wand very cheerfully. I am glad that you were able to have the wedding that you really wanted.


Rebekah (rebroxanna) | 604 comments Faye, My cake was a wedding gift too. Love the anecdote about the margarine.


William Land (williamland) | 1235 comments Mod
Rebekah wrote: "Faye, My cake was a wedding gift too. Love the anecdote about the margarine."

Loved the anecdote about the margarine, too, and the hat! Marie was obviously devoted to the fashions she loved from an earlier decade!


message 16: by Judy (new)

Judy (hugsjudy) | 66 comments Not sure where to post this because it's just a general post to all who have commented on this book. I have enjoyed all your comments as much as the book. Thanks all for sharing. Hugs. Judy


message 17: by Cindy (new)

Cindy Sweet | 186 comments I am very glad you came back Judy. You are a valuable member and I missed you when you weren't here. And I love your love story


message 18: by Beverly (new)

Beverly | 996 comments Cindy wrote: "I am very glad you came back Judy. You are a valuable member and I missed you when you weren't here. And I love your love story"

Exactly, Cindy. Don't leave us again, Judy.


message 19: by Judy (new)

Judy (hugsjudy) | 66 comments I won't leave. I missed you all too. I know I am not posting much. I have all of a sudden developed arthritis in my hands and I have slowed down on posting everywhere. However like I said, I enjoy reading your posts. This is a great Judy mystery. Hugs Judy


J. Michael | 130 comments Beverly wrote: "J. Michael wrote: "We were married in a sacred Native American shrine that is located in an ancient cave in Eureka Springs, Arkansas."

Was the cave cold? What did you wear?"


http://www.eurekaminister.com/grotto-...

No, the cave was surprisingly pleasant, especially for mid-January. I wore jeans and a shirt on the drive to Eureka Springs, and then changed clothes in the men's room of an old-fashioned railroad station. I wore dress slacks, a button-down dress shirt, and a new black leather jacket for the ceremony. The officiant had moved to Arkansas from Louisiana after Hurricane Katrina, and couldn't have been nicer. He told us to always mind "The Four L's": Love. Laugh. Listen. Learn. It was good and true advice.


message 21: by Faye (new)

Faye Kisker | 382 comments The cave looks enchanting! And I agree with the 4 'L's, what great advice.


William Land (williamland) | 1235 comments Mod
Faye wrote: "The cave looks enchanting! And I agree with the 4 'L's, what great advice."

The cave is lovely and I, too, think the four "L's" represent wonderful advice. Not just to a married couple, but in other relationships, too.


message 23: by Beverly (new)

Beverly | 996 comments J. "J. Michael wrote: "No, the cave was surprisingly pleasant, especially for mid-January. I wore jeans and a shirt on the drive to Eureka Springs, and then changed clothes in the men's room of an old-fashioned railroad station. I wore dress slacks, a button-down dress shirt, and a new black leather jacket for the ceremony. The officiant had moved to Arkansas from Louisiana after Hurricane Katrina, and couldn't have been nicer. He told us to always mind "The Four L's": Love. Laugh. Listen. Learn. It was good and true advice.."

Thanks for the details.


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