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ARCHIVE > TERI'S 50 BOOKS READ IN 2015

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message 1: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Aug 21, 2015 03:57PM) (new)

Bentley | 37667 comments Mod
Teri, here is your new thread in 2015. Happy reading in the new year.

Our Required Format:

JANUARY

1. My Early Life, 1874-1904 by Winston S. Churchill by Winston S. ChurchillWinston S. Churchill
Finish date: January 2015
Genre: (whatever genre the book happens to be)
Rating: A
Review: You can add text from a review you have written but no links to any review elsewhere even goodreads. And that is about it. Just make sure to number consecutively and just add the months.


message 2: by Teri (last edited Feb 25, 2015 08:27AM) (new)

Teri (teriboop) JANUARY

1. Last Call The Rise and Fall of Prohibition by Daniel Okrent by Daniel OkrentDaniel Okrent
Finish date: January 31, 2015
Genre: Historica Non-fiction
Rating: A
Review: Extensively researched, Daniel Okrent's Last Call: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition meticulously covers Prohibition from the years leading up to the Volstead Act and the 18th Amendment through to the few years following the repeal via the 21st Amendment. Okrent profiles the major and some minor players from both sides of the issue, the Wets and the Drys including organizations like the Anti-Saloon League, The Women's Christian Temperance Union including Frances Willard, Carrie A. Nation, the major brewers (Anheuser Busch, Pabsts, etc.), gangsters like Al Capone and Meyer Lanksy, politcians, and rum runners. This book was the inspiration behind Ken Burns file Prohibition. Also very much worth the time to review.

I thoroughly enjoyed the details, notes, pictures, and detailed of all aspects of prohibition. If you have any interest at all, this would be the book to read.


message 3: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) I'm glad you liked that book too, Teri. It was a great "buddy read!


message 4: by Teri (new)

Teri (teriboop) I know better! That's what I get for posting after a 12 hour marathon of reading on my Kindle. I was a bit bleary-eyed.

Bentley wrote: "Teri not bad - the month has to also be all caps and bold. You have everything else pitch perfect.

Also you seem to have an extra blank line between the month and the top of the citation."



message 5: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 37667 comments Mod
No worries (smile)


message 6: by Teri (last edited Feb 25, 2015 08:26AM) (new)

Teri (teriboop) FEBRUARY

2. Miramont's Ghost by Elizabeth Hall by Elizabeth Hall (no photo)
Finish date: February 7, 2015
Genre: Historical Fiction
Rating: B+
Review: Miramont's Ghost by Elizabeth Hall is a fictional tale inspired by the Miramont Castle nestled in the Rocky Mountains in Manitou Springs, Colorado, just outside of Colorado Springs. The story follows young Adrienne Beauvier in the 1890s. She is the granddaughter of french diplomat Comte de Challembelles. Adrienne has a special ability of clairvoyance, like her late grandmother, which is not well received by anyone, most especially her wretched aunt Marie and her cousin Father Julien. The trouble is, Adrienne only seems to see horrible things that involve her aunt and cousin, and it is at Miramont Castle where they try to hide from the gossip and judgement of family and friends.

I did like this story, although there were parts I could have done without. I wanted to read this book because I used to live in Colorado Springs and toured Miramont Castle on multiple occasions. Hall's depiction of Colorado Springs/Manitou in the 1890s is spot on, as is the description of the castle. Although the book is completely fictional, is is based on the real priest who built the castle. The storyline is purely speculation on the author's part, but you can see how it could be a possible explanation as to what really happened at Miramont Castle.


message 7: by Teri (last edited Feb 25, 2015 08:27AM) (new)

Teri (teriboop) 3. Chasing the Ripper by Patricia Cornwell by Patricia CornwellPatricia Cornwell
Finish date: February 8, 2015
Genre: Non-fiction
Rating: B+
Review: Chasing the Ripper is Patricia Cornwell's follow up to Portriat of a Killer where she surmises that famous painter Walter Sickert is the legendary Jack the Ripper. In this Kindle single, Cornwell discusses her continued research in the unsolved murder and pointedly responds to her critics and their specific concerns with her work.

Likely we will never know beyond a shadow of a doubt who Jack really was, but Cornwell has thoroughly done her research and has a valid hypothesis.

Portrait Of A Killer Jack The Ripper -- Case Closed by Patricia Cornwell by Patricia CornwellPatricia Cornwell


message 8: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) I read her first book about the Ripper and thought she made some good points in favor of Sickert but I wasn't totally convinced. I will have to read this second one now. Isn't it strange that Jack the Ripper has captured the imagination of the public for over 100 years?


message 9: by Teri (last edited Feb 25, 2015 08:27AM) (new)

Teri (teriboop) 4. Landslide LBJ and Ronald Reagan at the Dawn of a New America by Jonathan Darman by Jonathan DarmanJonathan Darman
Finish date: February 24, 2015
Genre: Non-fiction/Biography
Rating: B+
Review: In his first book Newsweek journalist Jonathan Darman compares the landslide elections of Lyndon Johnson and Ronald Reagan and details the undercurrent issues that faced America during their political careers. In Landslide: LBJ and Ronald Reagan at the Dawn of a New America, Darman details LBJ's presidency from the time he took office after Kennedy's assassination and his eventual landslide for his full term election. He also reviews Reagan's move from Hollywood actor to political soundboard for the Republican party, to his rise as California governor in his own landslide election during LBJ's tenure in office.

I enjoyed the book to the point that I knew little about LBJ but remember Reagan as president and was able to get some in-depth knowledge about both men and their journey to the presidency. I expected more of a compare/contrast scenario between the men, but felt like the book was really more about Johnson and Reagan was thrown in for an occasional thematic contrast.

I also learned a bit about Lady Bird Johnson who seemed to be LBJ's confidant and champion. She was quite a lady. Darman briefly mentioned Nancy Reagan and never showed how she may or may not have been that same support system for Reagan.

All in all, I enjoyed the book and plan to read more on LBJ. I wasn't a big fan of his before, but have a better respect for him, while my thoughts on Reagan see him more as the actor playing a politician than the politician I thought he was.

In compliance with FTC guidelines, please note that I received this book for free through the History Book Club on Goodreads.


message 10: by Teri (new)

Teri (teriboop) It really is, Jill. Lots of people out there are still tracking him down. I saw something on TV fairly recently where they had some DNA that supposedly identified who the killer was, but I think that was even a bit klugy.

I've not read any of Cornwell's mysteries. I want to, just haven't gotten around to it yet.

Patricia CornwellPatricia Cornwell

Jill wrote: "I read her first book about the Ripper and thought she made some good points in favor of Sickert but I wasn't totally convinced. I will have to read this second one now. Isn't it strange that Jack ..."


message 11: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 37667 comments Mod
Teri wrote: "Fixed. I should be banned from the computer late at night."

lol


message 12: by Teri (new)

Teri (teriboop) 5. The Girls of Atomic City The Untold Story of the Women Who Helped Win World War II by Denise Kiernan by Denise KiernanDenise Kiernan
Finish date: February 28, 2015
Genre: History/Non-fiction
Rating: A
Review: This book turned out to be much different than I expected. It was MUCH better. The Girls of Atomic City: The Untold Story of the Women Who Helped Win World War II takes place in Oak Ridge, TN where part of the atomic bomb was created/built. I guess I never realized that there were multiple locations where components of the bomb were built. I only thought there was the location in Los Alamos, NM. There were three, including a location in Washington. So what I expected out of Denise Kiernan's book was background on the wives of the scientists at Los Alamos. This book is about several women who went to work at the Clinton Engineer Works facility in Tennessee that did the uranium separating and the plutonium production for the Manhattan Project. Interspersed between the chapters about the women, their family, and their work were descriptions and explanations of the scientists, their work, and the process of collecting tubealloy, aka uranium. Those sections alone were worth the read to understanding how the a-bomb came to be and how the US was able to be the first in building the bomb.

This was such a great read that not only helps the layperson understand the scientific work, but understand how a whole city could virtually stay secret and how it's residents went to work, usually no questions asked, in order to help end the war and bring home their soldiers. It's hard to imagine people that were willing to uproot their lives and distance themselves from friends and family to go to work not understanding what they were doing, just that they were helping win the war. Fascinating read!


message 13: by Donna (new)

Donna (drspoon) It's going on the list, Teri. Thank you!


message 14: by Francie (new)

Francie Grice My list, too, Teri. Looks like a great read.


message 15: by Teri (new)

Teri (teriboop) Excellent, Ladies! You'll enjoy it.


message 16: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (MsTaz) | 5750 comments I will have to move this up the TBR list. Great review, Teri.


message 17: by Teri (last edited Aug 21, 2015 03:56PM) (new)

Teri (teriboop) MARCH

6. The Historical Novel by George Saintsbury by George Saintsbury (no photo)
Finish date: March 10, 2015
Genre: Literary Critique
Rating: B-
Review: In The Historical Novel, the 19th century literary critic George Saintsbury examines the history of the Historical Novel form from Xenophon to Dickens and his contemporaries. He begins by discussing Greek prose and the Roman epic, that are likely the earliest examples of historical fiction. He surmises that to have a historical novel, the author and the reader need to be familiar with the historical events so that there can be some distinction between history and fact and to allow criticism (i.e. review for understanding) by the reader. Saintsbury goes on to review and compare the novels and writings of Chaucer and Cervantes, examining the changes in heroes from factual to fiction; following up with a discussion on Walter Scott and Alexandre Dumas and their contemporaries then ending with Dickens and his contemporaries.

It was an interesting look at early historical novel/fiction. If you are not familiar with the works of the authors (or the authors themselves) mentioned then the reader might not completely understand the nuances the author discusses; however, it is still an interesting insight into earlier works.

XenophonXenophon
Geoffrey ChaucerGeoffrey Chaucer
Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraMiguel de Cervantes Saavedra
Walter ScottWalter Scott
Alexandre DumasAlexandre Dumas
Charles DickensCharles Dickens


message 18: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 37667 comments Mod
That looks very interesting Teri and thank you for the good author citation work as well.


message 19: by Teri (new)

Teri (teriboop) 7. Charlatan America's Most Dangerous Huckster, the Man Who Pursued Him, and the Age of Flimflam by Pope Brock by Pope BrockPope Brock
Finish date: March 23, 2015
Genre: History/biography
Rating: A-
Review: Charlatan is a book about the "goat gland guy". John R. Brinkley was a self-proclaimed doctor from the 1930s who performed surgeries to implant goat glands into men (and some women) to rejuvenate them. To be completely frank, this man was a "charlatan" or quack doctor who made thousands believe that by inserting goat glands into men's testes they could be young and revitalized, sexually and otherwise. Rather than help them, many left his hospital in worse shape than they started if they even left his hospital at all. He was continually harassed by Morris Fishbein of the American Medical Association, who was able to bring a suit against him for libel. Brinkley moved from Tennessee to Kansas and eventually Del Rio, Texas performing these operations, as well as selling his useless medical potions. His other claim to fame was construction of a "border blaster" radio station over the border in Mexico, so that he can be heard giving medical advice on the airways across the nation.

After I got over the shock of what this man did, I thoroughly enjoyed the story. I am constantly amazed at what people are suckered into believing. Author Pope Brock did a great job detailing the life of the goat gland guy and the man who basically destroyed him.


message 20: by José Luís (new)

José Luís  Fernandes | 1016 comments Teri wrote: "March

6. The Historical Novel by George Saintsbury by George Saintsbury (no photo)
Finish date: March 10, 2015
Genre: Literary Critique
Rating: B-
Review: In The Historical Nove..."


I wonder how outdated that work is.


message 21: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) Teri....I'm glad you liked the "goat gland doctor" book. I thought it was amazing that people were so gullible.He was a true charlatan!!!!


message 22: by Teri (new)

Teri (teriboop) José Luís Pinto wrote: "Teri wrote: "March

6. The Historical Novel by George Saintsbury by George Saintsbury (no photo)
Finish date: March 10, 2015
Genre: Literary Critique
Rating: B-
Review: In The Hi..."


It is an old book but still worth the read to view historical fiction from the eyes of one living in the 1800s.


message 23: by Teri (new)

Teri (teriboop) Jill wrote: "Teri....I'm glad you liked the "goat gland doctor" book. I thought it was amazing that people were so gullible.He was a true charlatan!!!!"

I am so glad I saw this on your list. It was highly entertaining yet repulsive. Del Rio is just a few hours from me and I believe Brinkley's mansion is stil there with historical markers. I think I'm intrigued enough to make the drive and check it out.

On another note, if you look at Brinkley's photo on Wikipedia he looks just like my husband's best friend. The resemblance is spooky.


message 24: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) Alisa always laughs at me for reading "odd" books....so now I am vindicated since you liked it too. Quite a story. Stay away from your husband's best friend....he may be a clone of Brinkley!!!!


message 25: by Alisa (last edited Mar 24, 2015 12:37PM) (new)

Alisa (MsTaz) | 5750 comments Jill and I chuckle over our respective love of the obscure. Teri, I see she has sucked you into our little vortex. Welcome to the club! And yes, I do have the goat book on my to-read list. I am just waiting for Jill to get to Cod.

Charlatan America's Most Dangerous Huckster, the Man Who Pursued Him, and the Age of Flimflam by Pope Brock by Pope BrockPope Brock
Cod A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World by Mark Kurlansky by Mark KurlanskyMark Kurlansky


message 26: by Teri (last edited Mar 24, 2015 02:43PM) (new)

Teri (teriboop) Alisa wrote: "Jill and I chuckle over our respective love of the obscure. Teri, I see she has sucked you into our little vortex. Welcome to the club! And yes, I do have the goat book on my to-read list. I am..."

Ha! I put Cod on my list a bit ago - probably from you guys. I have to move it up now. ;-)

Cod A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World by Mark Kurlansky by Mark KurlanskyMark Kurlansky


message 27: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (MsTaz) | 5750 comments Ha! I love the microhistories. :-)


message 28: by Jill (last edited Mar 24, 2015 04:01PM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) Looks like I will have to get Cod now!!!!.....I wouldn't have given it a second thought until Alisa gave it a good review. That's the nice thing about having buddies and fellow history lovers in the HBC, one always gets turned on to another book that might have been out of one's area of interest.

Cod A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World by Mark Kurlansky by Mark KurlanskyMark Kurlansky


message 29: by Donna (new)

Donna (drspoon) Jill wrote: "Looks like I will have to get Cod now!!!!.....I wouldn't have given it a second thought until Alisa gave it a good review. That's the nice thing about having buddies and fellow history lovers in th..."

Well, I certainly don't want to be left out! Maybe we need to have a group read.

Cod A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World by Mark Kurlansky by Mark KurlanskyMark Kurlansky


message 30: by Teri (new)

Teri (teriboop) I'm in!


message 31: by Skeetor (new)

Skeetor | 311 comments I'm thinking about it!


message 32: by Teri (new)

Teri (teriboop) 8. #Berlin45 The Final Days of the Third Reich by Philip Gibson by Philip Gibson (no photo)
Finish date: March 26, 2015
Genre: History
Rating: D
Review: I really wanted to like #Berlin45 but I thought it was a #fail. I love the premise of seeing the last days of Berlin during WWII play out as if social media was available so many years ago. This is really a hard idea to pull off. Since this is a serious subject, you don't want to make a joke of it by using too much hashtag/twitter speak of today. Yet, to a point, that is what I expected.

The book actually wasn't written in hashtags, but short comments, as if the person speaking was posting on Twitter. A lot of what was said, though, likely would never be posted to Twitter because it was information about the war that military/political personnel would never have posted publicly. An example is Harry Truman posting that he was about go into a meeting about the Manhattan Project. He would not have publicly mentioned the Manhattan Project until after the bomb was dropped, and certainly not on Twitter. There were moments that I could see some hope. I liked that author Philip Gibson used NY Times and Reuters postings as "characters". Those were plausible posts to me. John Q. Public would follow the news outlets and expect to read what was going on in the war through the big new streams. I don't think that Eisenhower, Patton, Stalin, Hitler, etc. would be posting information about active maneuvers and war plans, though.

There were no hashtags used, no idea that this book was anything other than short quotes that you might read in someone's diary. The only modern technique employed was the use of email addresses for each character.

The historical information was well and good. It did show how crazy life was for the characters involved in those days. I just thought that the idea of putting the events of those last few days into the context of social media did not come through. I think I would have enjoyed it more, if it was written in documentary/biographical form. If you're going to try to use a modern technique, you have to go all in. #onlyworth2stars

Harry S. TrumanHarry S. Truman
Dwight D. EisenhowerDwight D. Eisenhower
George S. Patton Jr.George S. Patton Jr.
Joseph StalinJoseph Stalin
Adolph Hitler (no photo)


message 33: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) Nice review, Teri. That book is not for me either.


message 34: by Teri (new)

Teri (teriboop) 9. Ken Burns The Kindle Singles Interview (Kindle Single) by Tom Roston by Tom Roston (no photo)
Finish date: March 30, 2015
Genre: Interview
Rating: B+
Review: I am completely captivated by the works of Ken Burns. Tom Roston's interview with Ken Burns sheds a little light on what makes him tick and his thought process when filming some of his previous work, particularly with the PBS series The Roosevelts. He also mentions his upcoming projects and lets the reader know that he's under contract to keep cranking out documentaries through at least 2022.

The Roosevelts An Intimate History Enhanced with Audio and Video by Geoffrey C. Ward by Ken BurnsKen Burns


message 35: by Teri (last edited Aug 21, 2015 03:56PM) (new)

Teri (teriboop) APRIL

10. Computer Crime, Investigation, and the Law by Chuck Easttom by Chuck EasttomChuck Easttom
Finish date: April 2, 2015
Genre: Text/Non-Fiction
Rating: B
Review: I used this book as a text for an Introduction to Cyber Criminology class I am teaching. It is okay but not fantastic. It is a bit outdated and with all of the constant changes in technology and cyber crime, a book written last week is outdated. However, I love the layout, sections, and chapters. It is a good fundamental text for the beginner. I would like to see a teachers companion book to go along with it as well.


message 36: by Teri (new)

Teri (teriboop) 11. Flash Boys A Wall Street Revolt by Michael Lewis by Michael LewisMichael Lewis
Finish date: April 6, 2015
Genre: Non-fiction
Rating: A-
Review: Flash Boys is a look at the inside of the High Frequency Trading of the US stock market/financial world. A small group of young Wall Street guys came together to change the way HFT is done, seeing that some banks had an edge in trading that seemed inconsistent and possibly rigged. Michael Lewis chronicles the business lives of these "Flash Boys", men like Brad Katsuyama and Sergey Aleynikov who exposed the issue of HFT rigged trades and created their own exchange to even the playing field.

I work in the financial sector but not in the direct area of trading. Dealing with the technical side of things I understood, to a point, the "need for speed" in trading but not to the extent that the book exposed. I see things much differently now. A very interesting and eye-opening look into the stock market.


message 37: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 37667 comments Mod
Great progress Teri


message 38: by Teri (new)

Teri (teriboop) 12. Killing Patton The Strange Death of World War II's Most Audacious General by Bill O'Reilly by Bill O'ReillyBill O'Reilly
Finish date: April 25, 2015
Genre: History
Rating: B+
Review: Killing Patton is Bill O'Reilly's and Martin Dugard's fourth book in the Killing series. This installment takes a look at the military service of General George S. Patton during WWII, painting a picture of a strong-willed, crass spoken man who lived to serve his country. He seemed to follow the creed of Country, God, Family and had no patience for cowards. Eisenhower considered him to be an important leader on the battlefield, but a detriment otherwise. Patton made some enemies and possibly to the point that it cost him his life.

What I like about the Killing series is that the authors try to give the readers a look at life during the time of these prominent figures who were assassinated or "possibly assassinated" through fact based narrative. Without conjecture, they attempt to show the many sides to the story of these men, allowing the reader to come to their own conclusion, or perhaps, walk away scratching their head no closer to the answer.

With Killing Patton, the authors tended to be too broad, I think. This book was only partially about Patton. It was more about the final battles and the central figures of the Allied and Axis sides of the war. Most of it I already knew, but there were some details of characters I was unfamiliar with. Some parts, I felt were unnecessary to the story of Patton and those he dealt with. I would have liked to have more information about Patton and less about the camps/Nazis figures, etc. that I don't think, played a role in anyway with Patton or his service. I'm sure these stories were to help paint the broader picture of the war and the times of stress and chaos, but I just felt like the focus was not totally on Patton and that the authors wanted more to just write a book on the final days of WWII. Regardless, I still thoroughly enjoyed reading the history and seeing this perspective of the war and the central characters.

Martin DugardMartin Dugard
Dwight D. EisenhowerDwight D. Eisenhower
George S. Patton Jr.George S. Patton Jr.


message 39: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) I have heard mixed reviews about that book, Teri, so I'm glad you liked it.


message 40: by Teri (new)

Teri (teriboop) 13. The Sabotage by Jeff Probst by Jeff ProbstJeff Probst
Finish date: April 26, 2015
Genre: Middle-School Age/Adventure
Rating: B
Review: The Sabotage is the second book a new series by Survivor's own Jeff Probst. Geared to middle schoolers, This installment continues with Jane, Vanessa, Carter, and Buzz in the middle of a fight for survival. Having almost being rescued by their parents after their first shipwreck, the kids find themselves on a new island, this time inhabited by the Nakula people. Their only hope of survival and rescue pits them against other island youth in a race to the other side of the island through the forest. It's Survivor meets Hunger Games.

I like these stories even if they are for middle school kids. Well thought out and enjoyable for youngsters and adults.


message 41: by Teri (last edited Aug 21, 2015 03:57PM) (new)

Teri (teriboop) MAY
14. Hiroshima Notes by Kenzaburō Ōe by Kenzaburō ŌeKenzaburō Ōe
Finish date: May 31, 2015
Genre: History/Non-fiction
Rating: A
Review: Kenzaburō Ōe delivers a very thought-provoking book in Hiroshima Notes. Seven individual "notes"/chapters are compiled to offer the reader a look at life in the aftermath of the Hiroshima bombing that brought an end to World War II. Ōe wrote these notes after many visits to Hiroshima in the 60s. He details the rebuilding that was still continuing, the suffering and conditions of victims of the bombings, the men and women who treated and supported the survivors, and the ongoing work to ensure that nuclear weapons will never again bring such an atrocity to the world.

Ōe offers a perspective that I had never really considered. You don't hear much about the a-bomb/h-bomb survivors. Many suffer in silence. Many blame their own country for putting them in a situation where such an outcome was even considered. A few considered that suicide was the better alternative to suffering through their pain. Even today, the effects are seen in later generations that are born with diseases/conditions that are a direct result of what their parents suffered.

I think this should be required reading for high school and college students studying World War II.


message 42: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) That sounds like a very intense book, Teri......and disturbing.


message 43: by Teri (new)

Teri (teriboop) It actually wasn't too graphic or disturbing, but he certainly made you think about the aftermath of the bombing from their point of view and how years later, people still are contracting leukemia and other diseases that are a result of the bombing.

I was also very surprised at how much they blamed their own government at the time. Not that they took any onus off of the US for dropping the bomb, but he did pose the question of whether that was the only option to stop Japan at the time.

It had a somewhat positive undertone, I thought, in that they are trying to come together as a nation (that was in the 60s somewhat split on how to proceed politically with rebuilding) to send a message of removing nuclear weapons so that this would not happen again and that there are good dedicated doctors who continue to treat the survivors.

Jill wrote: "That sounds like a very intense book, Teri......and disturbing."


message 44: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) I read a book about the development and dropping of the bomb (I am blocking on the name of it) and the scientists didn't have a clue what the effects would be. They seemed unaware of radiation poisoning and that is scary.
I have very strong opinions about the dropping of the nuclear bomb(s) on Japan which don't need to be discussed here....suffice it to say I think there were other options.


message 45: by Teri (new)

Teri (teriboop) Whole-heartedly agree! :-)


message 46: by Teri (last edited Aug 21, 2015 03:57PM) (new)

Teri (teriboop) JUNE

15. Apple Watch Apple Watch Guide, Tips and Tricks (Apple Geek Book 1) by Nicholas Walker by Nicholas Walker (no photo)
Finish date: June 6, 2015
Genre: User's Guide
Rating: C
Review: This was a short guide to using the Apple Watch. It doesn't go into great details and it would have been improved by using screenshots/pictures as how-to guides. I'm sure I'll refer to a couple of sections from time to time, but I didn't learn a lot new from it.


message 47: by Teri (new)

Teri (teriboop) 16. How To Get To Carnegie Hall (Kindle Single) by Paul Reiser by Paul Reiser (no photo)
Finish date: June 7, 2015
Genre: Memoir/Comedy
Rating: A
Review: I love Paul Reiser's comedy and it certainly comes through in this short work. In How To Get To Carnegie Hall, Reiser waxes nostalgic on the legends of comedy that he has worked with over the years and the great lessons he has learned from them about working as a comedian in show business. You can tell he loves his craft and the people that has inspired him along the way.


message 48: by Teri (new)

Teri (teriboop) 17. The Wedding Circle by Ashton Lee by Ashton Lee (no photo)
Finish date: June 27, 2015
Genre: Southern Fiction
Rating: B+
Review: The Cherry Cola Book Club gathers again in Ashton Lee's third novel The Wedding Circle. Maura Beth Mayhew is the local librarian in the small southern town of Cherico, Mississippi. Beside constantly battling the city council on a new library, Maura Beth is planning her wedding very differently than her mother would like. Her betrothed is also battling his own family issues with his estranged sister. It seems like everyone in town has some tough choices and comprises to make. The message that shines through is one of tolerance and understanding, and the love of family and friends can weather any storm.

Another enjoyable read about this little southern town. I am enjoying the series and see Lee's writing mature with each new book in the series. Looking forward to the next in the series this fall.


message 49: by Teri (last edited Aug 21, 2015 03:57PM) (new)

Teri (teriboop) JULY

18. The Crops Look Good News from a Midwestern Family Farm by Sara DeLuca by Sara DeLuca (no photo)
Finish date: July 6, 2015
Genre: Family History
Rating: A
Review: A stack of family letters. Many would toss old letters out with the trash. To a genealogist, personal letters are gold. Letters are personal, but they often detail daily life, triumphs and tragedies, and feelings that help future generations understand life in a different time. Sara DeLuca compiles over two decades worth of letters into a fabulous book of family history. The Crops Look Good chronicles the family life of the Williamson family on a dairy farm in rural Wisconsin. What evolves is a look into life throughout the Roaring Twenties, the Depression, World War II, and the move into the new technological era of the 50s. This is a story of a strong family that weathers every storm together, no matter how far away they are separated.

This book is well documented, not just with the Williamson family life, but with details about the current times nationally and globally. DeLuca does an excellent job of putting the letters into a cohesive, chronological story that paints a beautiful picture of the times they were written in. You get a sense of how close the family was and how important they were to each other. This is a fabulous book of family history and hopefully the reader will consider putting their own family in print to pass on to future generations.


message 50: by Teri (last edited Jul 07, 2015 04:23PM) (new)

Teri (teriboop) 19. Zombie Club by Sonia Rogers by Sonia Rogers (no photo)
Finish date: July 7, 2015
Genre: Teen/Young Adult Fiction
Rating: B+
Review: It was suppose to be a fun day for five sixth graders on a field trip to a local Civil War battlefield. The group of Military Club students along with their teacher/sponsor expected to learn about the famous battle of Wilson's Creek. They ended up in their own war against the un-dead. Not the ghosts of fallen soldiers, but ZOMBIES! This group of youngsters and their teacher must band together to make it back home to their families and loved ones. The Military Club has become the Zombie Club.

New author Sonia Rogers does a great job of introducing these characters in what is hopefully the first in a new series for teens/young adults. Reminiscent of Jeff Probst's Stranded Series, Zombie Club tells a story of diverse characters working in survival mode that bond as together as family in an unlikely situation.

Stranded (Stranded #1) by Jeff Probst by Jeff ProbstJeff Probst


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