The Dresden Files Read-Along discussion

Fool Moon (The Dresden Files, #2)
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Book 2: FOOL MOON (Spoilers Allowed)

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Berkley Publishing Group (berkleypub) | 14 comments Mod
Things are getting hairy in Chicago in Harry's second adventure! Let's talk FOOL MOON in this thread. Spoilers through SKIN GAME are permissible, so new readers beware!


Meryl | 11 comments I can't even imagine talking about this book without spoilers! Started on book 2 last week and have been waiting for the calendar to catch up with me. I'm listening to James Marster's wonderful reading, and thinking again of how much his characterization of Harry has evolved since these first two books. The funny thing - the role of John Marcone in the first two books was so much more substantial than in many of the middle ones, and seeing him and his organization come back in Changes and after as substantial players in the supernatural community of Chicago adds a lot of nuance to my reading this time.


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Julie Gattis (jukiee) | 32 comments Harry makes more potions in the first couple books. I was trying to think of a later potion he makes. I know there was the one used in Nevada to run/ fly down the hill in CHANGES. Off hand I don't remember others. Do you think it's because of greater confidence in his magic or a less close relationship with Bob?


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Charles Saint Pe | 2 comments Couldn't find a reply button on the mobile site, and they seem to expect you to have a proper enter key on the desktop version, so here I am pasting my reply attempt into this comment.
@Meryl
I mean, Marcone does have a pretty substantial role in Death Masks and Small Favor, and he at least has a presence in some of the other books, like when he saves the day in White Night.


message 5: by Julie (new)

Julie Gattis (jukiee) | 32 comments Meryl said: “…the role of John Marcone in the first two books was so much more substantial than in many of the middle ones,…”
And Marcone trussed up by ropes and spinning over a pit, throwing a knife into a rope, how sexy is that?


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Charles Saint Pe | 2 comments Seems like there's no way to edit comments either. Am I just stupid?


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Tim | 1 comments Julie wrote: "Harry makes more potions in the first couple books. I was trying to think of a later potion he makes. I know there was the one used in Nevada to run/ fly down the hill in CHANGES. Off hand I don't ..."

I don't think there's a good in story reason. I think it's all about keeping Harry's power in check to make the story more dramatic.


Gabriel | 3 comments Tim wrote: "Julie wrote: "Harry makes more potions in the first couple books. I was trying to think of a later potion he makes. "

The older books also found Harry getting a lot more preparation time. I wonder if this is the reason there's been less potion making and more evocation. OR, instead of creating consumables, Dresden focuses on the duster/rings.


Rashaun | 8 comments Julie wrote: "Harry makes more potions in the first couple books. I was trying to think of a later potion he makes. I know there was the one used in Nevada to run/ fly down the hill in CHANGES. Off hand I don't ..."

That is a good question. At least in the last few books he hasn't really had a good place to make much of anything with his apartment gone and all. That would be awesome to have a potions lab on the boat though. dangerous though too


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Julie Gattis (jukiee) | 32 comments Today is my 60th birthday. Who is going to hire the troll to sing for me?


Suzette Banick | 6 comments Julie wrote: "Harry makes more potions in the first couple books. I was trying to think of a later potion he makes. I know there was the one used in Nevada to run/ fly down the hill in CHANGES. Off hand I don't ..."

Jim actually answered this question in a CON or book signing or something. He said that he purposely made the books have a tighter timeline and less downtime. Without that down time, Harry does't have enough time to make potions


Meryl | 11 comments Charles wrote: "Couldn't find a reply button on the mobile site, and they seem to expect you to have a proper enter key on the desktop version, so here I am pasting my reply attempt into this comment.
@Meryl
I me..."

@Charles and @Julie yes, but think about Marcone's role with the Formor and his gradually increasing importance as an authority figure. I think you're right, Charles about Death Masks (but that's kind of storyline structure, except for the final section?) and Small Favor - but I see these as ways that his role was getting built for who he is now in the Dresden universe. And yeah, it's kind of fun watching Marcone be trussed up as bait, Julie!


Travis | 2 comments I finished Fool Moon about a week ago and man did I forget how intense and action packed this novel was. I found myself getting so lost in the pages and story.


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Julie Gattis (jukiee) | 32 comments Hi seems like I keep going back to the Potions subject. The "Give Me Energy" potion which made him think quicker, scoff at pain, and have no fear seems to be similar to the Winter Knight power. His destruction of the Winter Noble at his Birthday Party/First Day in Prison Yard in COLD DAYS displayed the confidence and surety of action that this potion provided to a lesser degree.


Christina | 1 comments Julie wrote: "Harry makes more potions in the first couple books. I was trying to think of a later potion he makes. I know there was the one used in Nevada to run/ fly down the hill in CHANGES. Off hand I don't ..."


I went to a signing and this was a question posed to Jim. He said that the decrease in potion making is to show Harry's growth that he is more able to work on the fly and that he doesn't need as many "crutches". So guess it also goes to Harry's confidence. But I don't think it has anything to deal with his relationship with Bob as I think is has been briefly mentioned that Harry can attain the information on potions, Accords, and other things in other ways but Bob is able to provide it instantly. All that said I will say I do miss the potions because I loved the descriptions given on creating them.


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Yasmin Mazur | 27 comments Christina wrote: "Julie wrote: "Harry makes more potions in the first couple books. I was trying to think of a later potion he makes. I know there was the one used in Nevada to run/ fly down the hill in CHANGES. Off..."

hearing the description of the potion-making again makes me think it's a good thing they're gone. it's cumbersome, and the ingredients required are bizzare - how much time does it take to make "crow's crow"? and the sunshine has also become impossible to make. I think Harry prefered to spend his time on the big project...


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Yasmin Mazur | 27 comments one of the things I really like about the Dresden Files is the attention to details. I doubt every little thing is part of a masterplan (otherwise why have such a lag between novels), but things that appeared in early books make a comeback in later ones.
I'd mention what the demon told harry in the circle about his family - years before we meat Thomas, but there is another small example that I only caught rereading SF - The Third Eye addict at the police station in SF was calm until they put him in the cells, and then he freaked out and took off. Appearantly that drug does give the ability to see the future - because in FM there's a slaughter in those cells - if I saw the loup garu - I'd take off too....


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Julie Gattis (jukiee) | 32 comments Who do you think took Susan's Loup-garou tape? Did they eliminate the film tech at WGN? Harry theorizes it was government conspiracy but I'm not sure about that. thoughts?


Rashaun | 8 comments Julie wrote: "Who do you think took Susan's Loup-garou tape? Did they eliminate the film tech at WGN? Harry theorizes it was government conspiracy but I'm not sure about that. thoughts?"
I was thinking about that. My first thought is the black council. Why though I don't know. I might just be looking for a connection that isn't there. Could just be that the white council didn't want to take the chance of too many people believing the tape so payed the tech to disappear. That would actually make more sense now that I think about it.


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Yasmin Mazur | 27 comments Rashaun wrote: "Julie wrote: "Who do you think took Susan's Loup-garou tape? Did they eliminate the film tech at WGN? Harry theorizes it was government conspiracy but I'm not sure about that. thoughts?"
I was thin..."


one of the other orders - which there are plenty of around. the vampires also have a motive to hush this up, as well as the fae...
basically - while Harry is out and publishing himself as a wizard, he's the only one that does it - the rest of the community is keeping the masquerade.


Gabriel | 3 comments Yasmin wrote: "
one of the other orders - which there are plenty of around. the vampires also have a motive to hush this up, as well as the fae...
basically - while Harry is out and publishing himself as a wizard, he's the only one that does it - the rest of the community is keeping the masquerade."


THIS.

We are too early in the series for every deed to be attributed to the big bad of the series. This is more along the lines of world building and helping to explain why - despite all of the supernatural activity going around - so few mortals know about anything.


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Jaclyn Praskavich | 2 comments Julie wrote: "Meryl said: “…the role of John Marcone in the first two books was so much more substantial than in many of the middle ones,…”
And Marcone trussed up by ropes and spinning over a pit, throwing a kni..."


"Marcone trussed up by ropes and spinning over a pit" oooooo......ya.....never thought about it like that before 😜😉


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Jaclyn Praskavich | 2 comments Yasmin wrote: "one of the things I really like about the Dresden Files is the attention to details. I doubt every little thing is part of a masterplan (otherwise why have such a lag between novels), but things th..."

good eye ! I never caught on about the person on third eye freaking out about the future Loup-garou attack ! That's a great detail !


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Paulum Mortis | 14 comments Yasmin wrote: "that drug does give the ability to see the future - because in FM there's a slaughter in those cells"

Oh my god, I feel so stupid. How did I not put that one together! I noticed the snoopy dog getting mauled by Mouse in a later book, but there are STILL details like 3i to tease out. I feel so stupid. It’s great!

As for who stole the Loup-Garou videotape… this is one of the few times in the series flat out vanilla mortals are getting involved I think. It could be one of many supernatural organisations but it seems like something as game changing as MAGIC existing would take at least a cursory attempt to stop it becoming obvious.


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Lillicat | 8 comments For some reason this book is by far my least favorite. I’m glad I got the SFBC omnibus with the first three books, because I might have stopped with this one and missed out on all the rest. It feels like there’s less humor in this one, a high body count of people who were trying to do good, and just a grind of unrelenting pain. I’m glad the Alphas survived, and I like Tera (except for every time she just gives up; what’s up with that?); I know there are enormous body counts in later books, but between the slaughter at the police station, the slaughter of the lycanthropes who were set up, the corruption of the FBI agents who had no real idea what they were getting into, and then not being able to save MacFinn (or his wildlife corridor) — I don’t know, maybe it’s just that this didn’t feel like a win. There was no triumphant “Ha! Suck it, bad guys!” feeling at the end, just a demoralized sort of “Well, it’s good that a few people survived” kind of thing. I did like the Burger King crown though. :-)

It might also be partially because we spend very little time with Bob and Mister, no time with Toot, and way too much time with Susan, who I don’t really like and who doesn’t feel like a full character to me. The women in Jim’s books are all amazingly well-drawn, except Susan, who kinda feels like The Plucky Girl Reporter / Convenient Plot Device. (Sorry if I’m rambling; I’m kinda working it out as I type.) We also haven’t met my other favorite characters yet, like Michael and Butters and Mouse and Molly and Lea and Thomas (Toe-moss!) and Lara and Shiro and ... well, you get the idea.

Anyway, when I read through the series, I usually skip this one. I considered skipping it this time, and have to admit I skimmed whole sections. I’m very much looking forward to rereading the later books.


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Yasmin Mazur | 27 comments Lillicat wrote: "For some reason this book is by far my least favorite. I’m glad I got the SFBC omnibus with the first three books, because I might have stopped with this one and missed out on all the rest. It feel..."

Tara is fatalistic - she accepts what she thinks is the inevitable. She doesn't know that Harry never quits...
Regarding the innocent body count - I don't count the Street Wolfs as innocents - and the other lychantrops are debatable. I'm mostly glad that Harry doesn't have direct murders - except the Loup Garou - on his soul.
Considering what he does at the next book - I prefer it when he's actively resisting Dark Harry.
The body count here is pretty low considering, and while Harry does spend most of the book being miserable, there are some funny scenes that show his optimistic lighthearted side.
That wakeup potion was just stupid, though...


message 27: by Adam (new) - rated it 5 stars

Adam Gutschenritter (heregrim) | 3 comments I want to love this book the most, I love werewolves and Butcher's take on all the different kinds had my soul giggling with joy. That being said, the book seemed rushed and I wish that he had done with these what he did with vampires and had a few more spread out. However, after reading the power levels of the various lycanthropes in the RPG and Butcher's history of Larping he would have had to pile a few werewolf books in a row and I know that would have just ticked me off.


message 28: by Ed (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ed Fleetwood | 5 comments Don't forget to read "B is for Bigfoot" before starting Grave Peril (It's in Brief Cases).
If you're going to do a read-along, do it right!


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