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Women Writers > Celebrating Women Writers

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message 1: by Ian (new)

Ian | 3027 comments Mod
Since its inaugural year in 1948, the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction has been awarded to a woman 18 times. America's National Book Award, launched in 1950, shares the same number, while the Man Booker, beginning in 1969, boasts 17. As of March 2019, that makes the number of times one of these prestigious literary awards has been awarded to a woman just one in four.

So, one of our themes for 2020 will be to celebrate women writers. Whose work do you love? Alongside more celebrated writers I'm keen to hear about those you think have not had the recognition they deserve.
Here's a list to prompt your thoughts should you need it. And who doesn't love a list? Are your favourites on it?😊

https://www.abebooks.com/bo…/best-fem...


message 2: by Karen (last edited Jan 26, 2020 07:16AM) (new)

Karen | 323 comments Ian wrote: "Since its inaugural year in 1948, the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction has been awarded to a woman 18 times. America's National Book Award, launched in 1950, shares the same number, while the Man Booker,..."

I couldn't open the Abe books link. Excellent sellers of secondhand books by the way.

More often than not I choose to read books by women authors. One who stands out for me is Chimamanda Ngozi
Adichie
, also Roma Tearne, who I started reading because of the Sri Lankan connection. I've read all the novels Andrea Levy wrote and will miss her as an author.

I really enjoyed Elmet Fiona Mozley and Kamila Shamsie was a good discovery.

I've often enjoyed Margaret Atwood, although some are a little strange, especially that Elvis novel, which was really good until it went into the realms of Elvis.

When I want a nice easy read I go to Elif Shafak and have just discovered that I enjoy Kate Atkinson. Another favourite was the Neopolitan series by Elena Ferrante, but I'm not sure whether it has been confirmed this is a female writer. There was some mystery about it. I did find other novels were too similar to the Neopolitan series. Stella Duffy is another little known easy read. All her novels are very different to each other.

Debut novelists I want to try are Abi Dare and Deepa Anappara.

I want to revisit George Eliot soon, and thoroughly enjoyed Mazo de la Roche recently, but of the older women novelists Daphne Du Maurier stands out for me.

I'm very interested in hearing about others favourite women authors and seeing the Abe books list


message 3: by Ian (new)

Ian | 3027 comments Mod
Karen wrote: "Ian wrote: "Since its inaugural year in 1948, the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction has been awarded to a woman 18 times. America's National Book Award, launched in 1950, shares the same number, while the..."

Trying again with the link https://www.abebooks.com/books/best-f...
C4IQHhSgEN1l_KYNfagCaQczKdXrMx1NIb2nd260d595-UI


message 4: by Karen (new)

Karen | 323 comments Ian wrote: "Karen wrote: "Ian wrote: "Since its inaugural year in 1948, the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction has been awarded to a woman 18 times. America's National Book Award, launched in 1950, shares the same num..."

Hmm, I still can't see it, but it could be my iPad...maybe see if others can load it.


message 5: by Ian (new)

Ian | 3027 comments Mod
Karen wrote: "Ian wrote: "Since its inaugural year in 1948, the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction has been awarded to a woman 18 times. America's National Book Award, launched in 1950, shares the same number, while the..."

Great choices there - not familiar with those debut novelists (pretty obviously I guess) - I'll check them out too. Elif Shafak is among my favourite writers. Tove Jansson also writes beautifully. Madeline Miller on this year's list too. I read nearly all of Iris Murdoch too


message 6: by Ian (new)

Ian | 3027 comments Mod
Karen wrote: "Ian wrote: "Karen wrote: "Ian wrote: "Since its inaugural year in 1948, the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction has been awarded to a woman 18 times. America's National Book Award, launched in 1950, shares ..."

The first link didn't work for me either but the second does

https://www.abebooks.com/books/best-f...

3rd time lucky?


message 7: by Karen (new)

Karen | 323 comments Ian wrote: "Karen wrote: "Ian wrote: "Since its inaugural year in 1948, the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction has been awarded to a woman 18 times. America's National Book Award, launched in 1950, shares the same num..."

The Observer today has a review of debut novelists, the majority of whom are women, it's interesting.


message 8: by Karen (last edited Jan 26, 2020 05:54AM) (new)

Karen | 323 comments Ian wrote: "Karen wrote: "Ian wrote: "Karen wrote: "Ian wrote: "Since its inaugural year in 1948, the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction has been awarded to a woman 18 times. America's National Book Award, launched in..."

Ian wrote: "Since its inaugural year in 1948, the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction has been awarded to a woman 18 times. America's National Book Award, launched in 1950, shares the same number, while the Man Booker,..."

Yes! Thank you.
Oh yes, Yaa Gyasi


message 9: by Ian (new)

Ian | 3027 comments Mod
Karen wrote: "Ian wrote: "Karen wrote: "Ian wrote: "Since its inaugural year in 1948, the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction has been awarded to a woman 18 times. America's National Book Award, launched in 1950, shares ..."

Thanks - I'll look online


message 10: by Ian (new)

Ian | 3027 comments Mod
Karen wrote: "Ian wrote: "Karen wrote: "Ian wrote: "Karen wrote: "Ian wrote: "Since its inaugural year in 1948, the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction has been awarded to a woman 18 times. America's National Book Award,..."

I have Yaa Gyasi on my tbr list - you must have mentioned her before


message 11: by DrMama (last edited Jan 26, 2020 09:18AM) (new)

DrMama | 329 comments I think I've read works by about 3/4 of the women authors listed, and some, I've read everything they ever wrote, eg: George Eliot, Margaret Atwood, Brontes, Jane Austen … There are a few others I adore, but I must give a special mention to Alice Munro: who 'walks on water' as far as I am concerned. Because she writes what (superficially) appear to be just (???) short stories, she is often overlooked - many people have never heard of her - but short stories are hard! Plus, what she does in her writing is incredible: she takes you under the kitchen linoleum to look into the deep, dark depths of human hearts, souls and relationships. She absolutely deserved her 'Nobel'.
I'm ashamed that I have not read as many works as I would like by more 'Women of the World' especially of the non-western world (I'm working on it) … and that's despite doing one of the few English Degrees that factored in many courses that covered Women's writing thru time, culture and countries.
Of the ones here, I'm not keen on Ann Patchett, Elena Ferrante (to me her work reads like ... just ... life/history/stealing … which is also my take on all biofiction) and more. However, other stars (for me) are Ursula (K) le Guin, Kate Atkinson, Jennifer Egan and lots more. Missing are: Lucia Berlin, Nicola Barker (if only for 'Darkmans' = 'Middlemarch' on speed), Shirley Hazzard, Katherine Mansfield, A.L. Kennedy, Nawaal el Saddawi, Tsitse Dangaremba, Bessie Head …. and too, too many more. Plus, that's without considering all the ones who have been lost, or never even got a hearing!
Nice try though, I'm glad that someone at least tried.


message 12: by Karen (last edited Jan 27, 2020 08:03AM) (new)

Karen | 323 comments DrMama wrote: "I think I've read works by about 3/4 of the women authors listed, and some, I've read everything they ever wrote, eg: George Eliot, Margaret Atwood, Brontes, Jane Austen … There are a few others I ..."

Thanks so much for your list. There are three women you've mentioned who are on my to read list who I haven't got round to reading yet, so that will inspire me: Shirley Hazzard, Nawaal el Saddawi, Tsitse Dangaremba.
And a new one I want to try: Bessie Head.
Cheers


message 13: by Ian (new)

Ian | 3027 comments Mod
DrMama wrote: "I think I've read works by about 3/4 of the women authors listed, and some, I've read everything they ever wrote, eg: George Eliot, Margaret Atwood, Brontes, Jane Austen … There are a few others I ..."

Karen wrote: "DrMama wrote: "I think I've read works by about 3/4 of the women authors listed, and some, I've read everything they ever wrote, eg: George Eliot, Margaret Atwood, Brontes, Jane Austen … There are ..."

Such a thoughtful post Carol, thank you. I agree about Alice Munro. I am ashamed to say that I have only read 35 of the writers on the list, although I have read many other women writers who are not on there. Some of those you mention I have not read but have El Saadawi on my list - her work is extensive and looks fascinating. Kamila Shamsie, Elif Shafak, Sara Novoc, Irene Nemirovsky, Azar Nafisi would be some others. I enjoyed Ferrante so depart from you there.


message 14: by DrMama (new)

DrMama | 329 comments Hi Ian,
Thanks for that. Yes, there are so many, and sadly too many who are not heard/read well enough in the west. I have Elif Shafak on my tbr list, but as yet have nothing, but thanks for other names as I know nothing of Azar Nafisi or Sara Novac!?! However, the worst for me is that I know I have read Nemirovsky … but cannot remember what, or when … or even name anything ! Oh dear: 'I grow old, I grow old, I shall wear the bottoms of my trousers rolled,'!


message 15: by Ian (new)

Ian | 3027 comments Mod
DrMama wrote: "Hi Ian,
Thanks for that. Yes, there are so many, and sadly too many who are not heard/read well enough in the west. I have Elif Shafak on my tbr list, but as yet have nothing, but thanks for other ..."


Haha - Nemirovsky wrote Suite Française - a wonderful work. We all grow older every minute. Like a vintage wine we improve over time :)


message 16: by DrMama (new)

DrMama | 329 comments Ian wrote: "DrMama wrote: "Hi Ian,
Thanks for that. Yes, there are so many, and sadly too many who are not heard/read well enough in the west. I have Elif Shafak on my tbr list, but as yet have nothing, but th..."


Damn, of course! 'Suite Francaise'. I know it, have it, have read it several times. And … I referred to it and quoted it several times in a piece I wrote for our 'Left Bank' Writing Group's anthology, published last year (Leap of Faith). Oh Dear!!


message 17: by Ian (new)

Ian | 3027 comments Mod
DrMama wrote: "Ian wrote: "DrMama wrote: "Hi Ian,
Thanks for that. Yes, there are so many, and sadly too many who are not heard/read well enough in the west. I have Elif Shafak on my tbr list, but as yet have not..."


So many words, books, names hover on the edge of memory :) Happens to us all


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