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How the Light Gets In (Chief Inspector Armand Gamache, #9)
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Archive - Group Reads > How the Light Gets In by Louise Penny - February 2020

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message 1: by Jenny (last edited Jan 25, 2020 09:34PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jenny (diggensjenny) Hello fellow Louise Penny readers! This discussion is about How the Light Gets In by Louise Penny, your discussion leader is Sheri.
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about spoilers

Please note: If you have not finished reading the book spoilers are permitted in this discussion from the start.
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How the Light Gets In (Chief Inspector Armand Gamache, #9) by Louise Penny How the Light Gets In (Chief Inspector Armand Gamache, #9) by Louise Penny How the Light Gets In (Chief Inspector Armand Gamache, #9) by Louise Penny How The Light Gets In (Chief Inspector Armand Gamache, #9) by Louise Penny How The Light Gets In (Chief Inspector Armand Gamache, #9) by Louise Penny

Summary

Christmas is approaching, and in Québec it's a time of dazzling snowfalls, bright lights, and gatherings with friends in front of blazing hearths. But shadows are falling on the usually festive season for Chief Inspector Armand Gamache of the Sûreté de Québec. Most of his best agents have left or been transferred out of the Homicide Department; his old friend and lieutenant Jean-Guy Beauvoir hasn't spoken to him in months; and hostile forces are lining up against him.

When Gamache receives a message from Myrna Landers, in the village of Three Pines, he welcomes the chance to get away from the city for a few hours. Myrna's longtime friend, who was due to spend Christmas in the village, has failed to arrive. When Chief Inspector Gamache presses for information, Myrna is reluctant to reveal her friend's name. Mystified, Gamache soon discovers the missing woman was once one of the most famous people not just in North America but in the world, and now goes unrecognized by virtually everyone except the mad, brilliant poet Ruth Zardo.

As events come to a head at the Sûreté, Gamache is drawn ever deeper into the world of Three Pines. Increasingly, he is not only investigating the disappearance of Myrna's friend but also seeking a safe place for himself and his still-loyal colleagues—if such a refuge exists amid mounting danger. Is there peace to be found even in Three Pines, and at what cost to Gamache and the people he holds dear?


˜”*°•.˜”*°• Sheri  •°*”˜.•°*”˜ | 1480 comments Mod
We haven't been to Three Pines in a few months and I'm glad to be heading back. I'm missed my friends there. Hope you'll join me at The Bistro for a licorice pipe and a chat.


Barbara K | 328 comments I began my re-listen yesterday. Early on, there is an observation that it isn't so much that Gamache has answers for Myrna, it's that his very presence is reassuring. I couldn't agree more, with the additional comfort that comes from Ralph Cosham's narration.

I've read a number of reviews of the Gamache books that take exception to his continuous "moralizing", or words to that effect. For me, the way Gamache confronts challenging moral issues is one of the chief attractions of the series. We are living in a world where making the right ethical decisions seems to be of diminishing importance. Gamache is an antidote to the sadness this brings me.


˜”*°•.˜”*°• Sheri  •°*”˜.•°*”˜ | 1480 comments Mod
Whole heartily agree Barbara.


message 5: by Georgia (new) - added it

Georgia | 46 comments Here’s a second agreement


Susan | 14 comments I'm about a quarter of the way through. I've only read the first book in the series before this, and I didn't remember it very well, but it's starting to come back to me. I've obviously missed quite a few developments in the characters' lives but also in Louise Penny's work. I'm enjoying this one much more than I did the first one.


Barbara K | 328 comments Susan wrote: "I'm enjoying this one much more than I did the first one...."

Agreed, Susan. It took a few volumes for Penny to really find a way to tell her tales of Gamache.

I've just finished my re-read, which confirmed for me that this is one of my favorites in the series. I won't recap all the reasons here, but I've included them in my review.

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


PattyMacDotComma | 173 comments I very much enjoyed this one. I don't mind visiting other places - a city, monastery, resort - but I do prefer the atmosphere in Three Pines and seeing the recurring characters. I like the way they bounce off each other and the way Gamache and the city folk adapt to the village and its lack of sophisticated communication. Of course, in this book, a major plot point is overcoming that lack.

I wrote a review here which says a bit more.
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


˜”*°•.˜”*°• Sheri  •°*”˜.•°*”˜ | 1480 comments Mod
I agree with Patty in that I prefer the atmosphere in Three Pines and the people who live there. I too like the way they bounce off each other and the way Gamache adapts to the village. But, I didn't very much enjoy this book.

My review
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 10: by Jenny (last edited Feb 25, 2020 09:12PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jenny (diggensjenny) Sorry, Sheri that you did not enjoy this book. For me, this book is where I finally start to see the real Gamache and Beauvoir and the way they interact with each other.

My review

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


PattyMacDotComma | 173 comments Jenny wrote: "Sorry, Sheri that you did not enjoy this book. For me, this book is where I finally start to see the real Gamache and Beauvoir and the way they interact with each other.

My review

https://www.go..."


Jenny - that's a link to the book. Can we get the one to your review?


Jenny (diggensjenny) PattyMacDotComma wrote: "Jenny wrote: "Sorry, Sheri that you did not enjoy this book. For me, this book is where I finally start to see the real Gamache and Beauvoir and the way they interact with each other.

My review

..."


Thank you, Patty - never a good idea to do something in a hurry.


PattyMacDotComma | 173 comments Jenny wrote: "PattyMacDotComma wrote: "Jenny wrote: "Sorry, Sheri that you did not enjoy this book. For me, this book is where I finally start to see the real Gamache and Beauvoir and the way they interact with ..."

Ah, you're in good company (mine)!


MadProfessah (madprofesssah) | 43 comments Really? I think this is one of the best mysteries I have read in the last decade.


˜”*°•.˜”*°• Sheri  •°*”˜.•°*”˜ | 1480 comments Mod
MadProfessah wrote: "Really? I think this is one of the best mysteries I have read in the last decade."

Gosh it's great that you enjoyed it so much. I love the characters and scenery, just didn't love these two story lines.

I love book discussions.


Barbara K | 328 comments Sheri, I can appreciate your thoughts about the scope of the political intrigue.

Some years ago I might have thought the same, but we have seen so much of the underside of greed in recent years that I was willing to accept it. Just think about the completely unnecessary opioid addiction that has wreaked such havoc, all in the name of greed, people willing to ignore or deny the evidence even as it mounted.

The other part about that theme that worked for me is that Penny tied it back into the earlier volumes. It wasn't as if it came out of nowhere, which definitely wouldn't have worked for me.

But what she did with the quintuplet story was what I enjoyed most about this book.

With all that said, the threats to Gamache from within the Surete are never my favorite part of these books. It's SO stressful wondering how she will make it work out for Gamache!

One thing you are definitely right about, Sheri, is that it is always interesting to see how other people react to a book you've read. So many surprises!


message 17: by Jenny (last edited Feb 27, 2020 10:07PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jenny (diggensjenny) I agree with you, Sheri and Barbara. I love reading people's views about books—one of the reasons I enjoy Goodreads.

Another good reason to join a book discussion is to increase your favourite author's list.

I am looking forward to the March discussion on The Long Way Home


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