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2020 Wheel of Historical Mystery > Margaret's Wheel of Historical Mystery

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message 1: by Margaret (last edited May 13, 2020 11:02AM) (new)

Margaret | 122 comments My wedge completions:
1. Historical Mysteries
2. Historical Mysteries 2014 - Cradle to Grave
3. Regency and Victorian Mysteries - A Beautiful Blue Death
4. Historical Ghost Fiction - The Silent Companions
5. Historical Mysteries 2015
6. Sleuths in Silks (Female Detectives) - Mistress of the Art of Death
7. Historical Mysteries 2016 - Secrets in the Mist
8. Historical Mysteries in Ancient Times (Greece & Rome)
9. YA Historical Mysteries
10. Historical Mysteries 2017 - Darktown
11. Dual Time Mysteries
12. Mysteries with Literary Authors - The Pale Blue Eye
13. Sherlock Holmes - 1. The Beekeeper's Apprentice 2. Moriarty 3. A Monstrous Regiment of Women
14. Historical Mysteries 2018 - The Grave's a Fine and Private Place
15. Historical Cozy Mysteries - The Anatomist's Wife
16. Historical Mysteries 2019
17. Best Historical Crime Fiction - Medicus
18. Historical Mysteries 2020 - Things in Jars
19. Medieval Mysteries - The Tournament of Blood
20. Great War Veterans as Detectives - Legacy of the Dead
2 Bonus read - read any historical mystery of your choice
2 Lose a turn - ask a member of the group to choose a historical mystery for you to read. - A Rising Man


message 2: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Sherlock Holmes
B. The Beekeeper's Apprentice (Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes, #1) by Laurie R. King

I know it's hard to believe, but I've never read this book. I'm glad to have a reason to finally read it!


message 3: by Margaret (last edited Feb 09, 2020 06:54PM) (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Sherlock Holmes
B. The Beekeeper's Apprentice
C. Completed January 28, 2020

I really enjoyed this. Why did I wait so long to read this!


message 4: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Sleuths in Silks (Female Detectives)
B. Mistress of the Art of Death (Mistress of the Art of Death, #1) by Ariana Franklin


message 5: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Sleuths in Silks (Female Detectives)
B. Mistress of the Art of Death
C. Completed February 3, 2020

I truly enjoyed this!


message 6: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Historical Ghost Fiction
B. The Silent Companions by Laura Purcell


message 7: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Historical Ghost Fiction
B. The Silent Companions
C. Completed February 9, 2020

This was wonderful - a great blend of old and new ghost writing. The setting and characters were compelling. The tension continued to heighten throughout the book. Really enjoyed it.


message 8: by Margaret (last edited Feb 09, 2020 07:15PM) (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Historical Cozy Mysteries
B. The Anatomist's Wife (Lady Darby Mystery, #1) by Anna Lee Huber

Been looking forward to reading this (as an anatomist...and being an anatomist's wife, myself. LOL)


message 9: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Historical Cozy Mysteries
B.The Anatomist's Wife
C. Completed February 16, 2020

I really enjoyed this. A good mystery, some anatomical history, and a little romance. As an anatomist, I found it great fun.


message 10: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Great War Veterans as Detectives
B. Legacy of the Dead (Inspector Ian Rutledge, #4) by Charles Todd


message 11: by Margaret (last edited Feb 25, 2020 11:19AM) (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Great War veterans as detectives
B. Legacy of the Dead
C. Completed Feb. 22


message 12: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Historical Mysteries 2016
B. Secrets in the Mist (Gothic Myths, #1) by Anna Lee Huber


message 13: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Historical Mysteries 2016
B. Secrets in the Mist
C. Completed Feb. 27

Wasn't too crazy about this book. I much prefer her anatomist mystery series (Mistress of the Art of Death). I loved the setting, but it was more a romance than a mystery and some of the plot twists seemed forced. Ariana Franklin does romantic tension well, though!


message 14: by Margaret (last edited Mar 09, 2020 10:53AM) (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Regency and Victorian Mysteries
B. A Beautiful Blue Death (Charles Lenox Mysteries, #1) by Charles Finch


message 15: by Margaret (last edited Mar 24, 2020 08:28AM) (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Regency and Victorian
B. A Beautiful Blue Death
C. Completed Mar. 19


message 16: by Margaret (last edited Mar 24, 2020 08:29AM) (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Historical Mysteries 2020
B. Things in Jars by Jess Kidd


message 17: by Margaret (last edited Mar 24, 2020 08:35AM) (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Historical Mysteries 2020
B. Things in Jars
C. Completed March 24.

This is one of the best books that I have read this year. Jumping between the 1840s and 1860s, this trippy mystery has more than a hint of magical realism. The characters are engaging and multidimensional. The author's ability to provide backstory for even minor characters is part of the charm. Truly a fully realized world where people matter and not everything is black and white.


message 18: by Margaret (last edited Apr 01, 2020 10:21AM) (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Lose a Turn
B. A Rising Man (Sam Wyndham, #1) by Abir Mukherjee


message 19: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Lose a Turn
B. A Rising Man
C. Completed March 29.

I truly enjoyed this book. I wish the author hadn't italicized every non-English word....especially words that were repeated again and again, but that was a minor annoyance.


message 20: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Historical Mysteries 2014
B. Cradle to Grave (Will Rees, #3) by Eleanor Kuhns


message 21: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Historical Mysteries 2014
B. Cradle to Grave
C. Completed April 4

I really like this series. While normally set in post-revolutionary war Maine, this one has Rees and Lydia traveling to a town and Shaker community near Albany, NY. In addition to including a pretty good mystery, this series excels at giving you insight into how people lived at the time. How characters dealt with blizzards and poverty and how "Poor Relief" was accomplished (or avoided) was fascinating and disturbing. To make the story come alive, the author admits to using some anachronistic terminology, but it is done in a relatively formal way that is not annoying and does not disrupt the historical feel of the book. While my favorite is still the first in the series, I liked this third book much more than the second.


message 22: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Sherlock Holmes (2nd time)
B. Moriarty (Sherlock Holmes, #2) by Anthony Horowitz


message 23: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Sherlock Holmes (2nd time)
B. Moriarty
C. April 5-8, 2020


message 24: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Sherlock Holmes (3rd time - really??????)
B. A Monstrous Regiment of Women (Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes, #2) by Laurie R. King


message 25: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Sherlock Holmes
B. A Monstrous Regiment of Women
C. April 17-20, 2020

I really enjoyed this despite the unusual age difference. I wish I hadn't waited so long to read this series.


message 26: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Medieval Mysteries
B. The Tournament of Blood (Knights Templar, #11) by Michael Jecks


message 27: by Margaret (last edited Apr 24, 2020 11:58AM) (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Medieval Mysteries
B. The Tournament of Blood
C. April 20-24, 2020

I've been reading this series slowly for many years. The last few were good, but not as great as the initial ones (or maybe I was just getting tired of them). However, this one was superb for the most part. The detail about the tournament really made this come alive. While sometimes historical fiction can get bogged down in detail, this was done in the way that a person new to a tournament and amazed by everything around them would do. You really got a sense of the sweat and vomit surrounded by the pageantry and glittering clothes of the ladies, knights, heralds, etc. The murder was more interesting than some of the previous ones, as well. Considering I have many more books in this series to read, I am looking forward to them again.


message 28: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Historical Mysteries 2017
B. Darktown (Darktown, #1) by Thomas Mullen


message 29: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Historical Mysteries 2017
B. Darktown
C. April 24-30, 2020

Set in Atlanta in 1948, this book uses the true story of the first
African-American cops in Atlanta as the framework for a mystery that exposes the corruption within the police force. So many contrasts are presented in this book - the lives of well-educated African-American with lower middle class whites and the urban poor, both white and black. The lives of city folk are contrasted with the troubled experience of the rural African-American living in the same areas where their ancestors had been enslaved. Throughout the story runs the omnipresent racism and physical danger that all African-Americans lived with and have not fully escaped today. It is easy to see the roots of events today in the past as depicted here. This book has only scratched the surface, but it does not try to sanitize or excuse anything. All of the characters are compelling. I was a little disappointed that some of the white characters eventually turned out to have backstories that explained their complete rejection of the humanity of African-Americans. Having grown up white in Texas in the 60s and 70s, I am all too aware that sometimes people are just horrible racists. They don't need a pivotal experience to make them that way (or to excuse their behavior, which this book doesn't seem to want to do); they are the flowering of the racist culture they were raised in. I did like the fact that the more open-minded white guy was aware and ashamed of explicit racism, but was (for the most part) unaware of the implicit racism of his own actions. The wealthier African-American families could also not always see the impact of their behavior and assumptions on others not in their situation. The idea that even well-intentioned actions can have devastating consequences is a major theme in this book. Highly recommended.


message 30: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Mysteries with Literary Authors
B. The Pale Blue Eye by Louis Bayard


message 31: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Mysteries with Literary Authors
B. The Pale Blue Eye
C. May 1-5, 2020

I truly loved this book. I can't say much more without potentially spoiling it for others. Don't read the reviews, just read the book. I had been worried about this book as I've read novels with real people from history as major characters where the characterization was flawed or their inclusion pointless. This book was superb, however. I am looking forward to reading the other books by this author.


message 32: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Historical Mysteries 2018
B. The Grave's a Fine and Private Place (Flavia de Luce, #9) by Alan Bradley


message 33: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Historical Mysteries 2018
B. The Grave's a Fine and Private Place
C. May 6-8, 2020

This was a great contribution to the series. I thought the series had been flagging a bit, but this got it back on track.


message 34: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Best Historical Crime Fiction
B. Medicus (Gaius Petreius Ruso, #1) by Ruth Downie


message 35: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Best Historical Crime Fiction
B.
C. May 8-16, 2020

Really liked the unusual setting in Roman Britain and the characters. Keep waiting fo Monty Python, “What did the Romans ever do for us....”


message 36: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Historical Mysteries
B.


message 37: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 122 comments A. Historical Mysteries
B.
C. May 21-26, 2020

This one was well-written, but it took awhile to grab me. The main character is an American in turn of the century London and is deeply flawed. The book series is described as one where Sherlock Holmes meets Wild Bill Hickock, but neither is accurate. Denton is much more realistic than Holmes and is merely a smart guy using his brain when others aren’t paying attention or just don’t care. He carries a gun (American!) and can shoot, but the idea of him as a wild gunslinger is off base. He is one of the hollow men that came out of the Civil War, although he went into that war damaged. The author pulls no punches and paints the portrait of a man whose demons are omnipresent. He is sad and angry and mixed up and nearly destitute...there is almost a hint of noir, but no blonde bombshell (if there were, she would probably take off after a few scenes). He is very offensive and women tend to hold him at arm’s length. He is essentially unlikeable. Nonetheless, when the story grabbed me, it had me. The women that do appear in the book, no matter how briefly clearly have lives that he is impinging on in different ways. They are not willing to play the mother or the suffering girlfriend or the moll. He arouses pity, but not muc


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