Literary Fiction by People of Color discussion

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message 1: by ColumbusReads (new)

ColumbusReads (coltrane01) | 3713 comments Mod
If anyone would like to lead the discussion for SULA, please let me know. Thanks


message 2: by Dunori (new)

Dunori | 3 comments I don't want to lead but interested in participating in the discussion. I just joined the group so not sure how to "sign up".


message 3: by ColumbusReads (new)

ColumbusReads (coltrane01) | 3713 comments Mod
Dunori wrote: "I don't want to lead but interested in participating in the discussion. I just joined the group so not sure how to "sign up"."

Welcome, Dunori! No need to sign up to contribute to the conversation. We’ll provide a reading schedule at some point and you can jump in at any point with your comments about the book....Glad you’re here and let me know if you have any other questions.


message 4: by ColumbusReads (new)

ColumbusReads (coltrane01) | 3713 comments Mod
We begin our discussion of SULA today.

Some editions have an Epigraph and Foreword. If you’re able to find one online, please share it with the group.

Part 1 - Today thru Feb 11
Entire book open February 12th


message 5: by ColumbusReads (new)

ColumbusReads (coltrane01) | 3713 comments Mod
Who is currently reading SULA?

Those who have read it, where does it fall in your favorite book by this titan of American letters?


message 6: by Beverly (new)

Beverly | 2873 comments Mod
For me - ranking Ms. Morrison’s books is very difficult as they really fall into too categories loved or liked as each of her books were such a treasure and pleasure to read.


message 7: by Eileen (new)

Eileen | 23 comments I read Sula a few days ago. It was very good!


message 8: by Monica (new)

Monica (monicae) | 460 comments Just finished Sula and enjoyed it! For me, it didn't displace my Morrison favorites, however I find Morrison to be an amazing author who somehow manages to articulate feelings and emotions and moods of a culture so succinctly, yet so brilliantly.


message 9: by ColumbusReads (new)

ColumbusReads (coltrane01) | 3713 comments Mod
Monica wrote: "Just finished Sula and enjoyed it! For me, it didn't displace my Morrison favorites, however I find Morrison to be an amazing author who somehow manages to articulate feelings and emotions and mood..."

Which would be your Morrison favorites? In order if you’re able to rank them.


message 10: by B. P. (new)

B. P. Rinehart (ken_moten) | 34 comments I'm going to try to read this with y'all. I had planned to read this book last year, but after she died I knew a lot of folks would be reading her works and making all kind of hot-takes so I wanted to wait until things had cooled and this book club read gives me the perfect excuse to read it. I hope I can keep up with y'all.

After I read this book, I am going to go back to my library to re-check-out The Source of Self-Regard: Selected Essays, Speeches, and Meditations so I can read the parts of that book that discuss Sula.


message 11: by ColumbusReads (new)

ColumbusReads (coltrane01) | 3713 comments Mod
B. P. wrote: "I'm going to try to read this with y'all. I had planned to read this book last year, but after she died I knew a lot of folks would be reading her works and making all kind of hot-takes so I wanted..."

Great. Jump in when you can B.P.!


message 12: by Juliana (new)

Juliana LoBiondo | 1 comments I’ve been on a waiting list at the library, just got it today!


message 13: by Monica (last edited Feb 01, 2020 09:48PM) (new)

Monica (monicae) | 460 comments Columbus wrote: "Monica wrote: "Just finished Sula and enjoyed it! For me, it didn't displace my Morrison favorites, however I find Morrison to be an amazing author who somehow manages to articulate feelings and em..."

My favorite is still Song of Solomon though honestly I read it in the 90s. It's time for a reread to see how it resonates with a more "mature" woman ;-)

My next is Beloved. That is an incredible work. Harrowing, complex and one of her longer books, she managed to articulate the internal workings of a people.


message 14: by Titilayo (new)

Titilayo | 12 comments I haven't had the chance to discuss Sula since Sophomore year in college. 'm looking forward to revisiting it with "grown up eyes."


message 15: by B. P. (last edited Feb 02, 2020 09:56AM) (new)

B. P. Rinehart (ken_moten) | 34 comments Monica wrote: "My favorite is still Song of Solomon though honestly I read it in the 90s. It's time for a reread to see how it resonates with a more "mature" woman ;-)"

From what I understand from Morrison's own words, Sula is a spiritual sibling of Song of Solomon. The latter book is definitely my favorite book of hers that I have read so far.


message 16: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 103 comments B. P. wrote: "Monica wrote: "My favorite is still Song of Solomon though honestly I read it in the 90s. It's time for a reread to see how it resonates with a more "mature" woman ;-)"

From I understand from Morr..."


Yes! This makes so much sense. I felt like Sula was a sort of little sister to Song of Solomon, which is my favorite of hers as well. I have many more of hers to read before being able to rate them (as well as needing to re-read Beloved), but SOS is so very special, and I felt Sula had a similar feel.


message 17: by Monica (new)

Monica (monicae) | 460 comments When I finished Sula, the book that came to mind for me was another LFPC monthly that Morrison perhaps influenced. The excellent Augustown by Kei Miller. Anyone else get this vibe?


message 18: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 103 comments Monica wrote: "When I finished Sula, the book that came to mind for me was another LFPC monthly that Morrison perhaps influenced. The excellent Augustown by Kei Miller. Anyone else..."

Definitely, Monica. Another favorite! Do you think it's the magic, or something more?


message 19: by B. P. (new)

B. P. Rinehart (ken_moten) | 34 comments What's the policy with spoilers here? Because this is my first time reading the book.


message 20: by Lori (new)

Lori (lorijohnson) | 24 comments I've read SULA, at least 4-5 times over the course of my life. In each phase of my life, the reading has felt different. It is near the top of my list of Toni Morrison favs.


message 21: by ColumbusReads (new)

ColumbusReads (coltrane01) | 3713 comments Mod
B. P. wrote: "What's the policy with spoilers here? Because this is my first time reading the book."

We’re now discussing Part 1 thru Feb 11th. If you would like to comment on something beyond Part 1 then you can hide it behind a spoiler tag. View spoiler No one will see it unless they open it.


message 22: by B. P. (last edited Feb 02, 2020 02:56PM) (new)

B. P. Rinehart (ken_moten) | 34 comments I don't want to spoil anything actually, that was my concern because it seems I'm the one person here who has not read this book yet.


message 23: by Mekiva (new)

Mekiva | 56 comments I finished Sula last week in preparation for this discussion. I may be a minority here, but I hadn’t liked much of Morrison’s work until now. I LOVED this book. I’m ready to jump in with the discussion!


message 24: by Dunori (new)

Dunori | 3 comments Titilayo wrote: "I haven't had the chance to discuss Sula since Sophomore year in college. 'm looking forward to revisiting it with "grown up eyes.""

I think I read it when I was in college too; which was around two decades ago. I believe I still remember enough of it to actively participate in the discussion without re-reading it.


message 25: by Mle (new)

Mle | 8 comments I'm so glad I decided to join this month's read. My only previous exposure to Morrison's work was when we read Beloved in high school. It was so outside of my frame of reference/comprehension level/usual reading material that I just couldn't understand it. Of course, as I was a child at the time I assumed this meant I just didn't like Toni Morrison's style/subject matter/whatever and didn't pick up anything else of hers. How wrong I was! I loved Sula! Now I want to read more of her work and go back and reread Beloved and maybe check out the rest of her work.
I also need to reevaluate all the other books we read in high school.


message 26: by B. P. (new)

B. P. Rinehart (ken_moten) | 34 comments Just finished part 1, so far it really does call to mine a lot of elements she later used in Song of Solomon. But wow(view spoiler). I like the use of the foreshadowing and the other magical realist elements that Morrison is known for.


message 27: by B. P. (last edited Feb 05, 2020 11:18AM) (new)

B. P. Rinehart (ken_moten) | 34 comments This is the introductory except from the essay "A Writer Before The Page" included in Toni Morrison's The Source of Self-Regard: Selected Essays, Speeches, and Meditations

"I once knew a woman named Hannah Peace. I say 'knew,' but nothing could be less accurate. I was perhaps four years old when she was in the town where I lived. I don’t know where (or even if) she is now or to whom she was related then. She was not even a visiting friend. And I couldn’t to this day describe her in a way that would make her known in a photograph, nor would I recognize her if she walked into this room. But I have a memory of her and it’s like this: the color of her skin—the matte quality of it. Something purple around her. Also eyes not completely open. There emanated from her an aloofness that seemed to me kindly disposed. But most of all I remember her name—or the way people pronounced it. Never Hannah or Miss Peace. Always Hannah Peace—and more. Something hidden—some awe perhaps, but certainly some forgiveness. When they pronounced her name, they (the women and the men) forgave her something.

That’s not much, I know: half-closed eyes, an absence of hostility, skin powdered in lilac dust. But it was more than enough to evoke a character—in fact any more detail would have prevented (for me) the emergence of a fictional character at all. What is useful—definitive—is the galaxy of emotion that accompanied the woman as I pursued my memory of her, not the woman herself.

In the example I have given of Hannah Peace it was the having-been-easily-forgiven that caught my attention, and that quality, that 'easily forgivenness' that I believe I remembered in connection with a shadow of a woman my mother knew, is the theme of Sula. The women forgive each other—or learn to. Once that piece of the constellation became apparent, it dominated the other pieces. The next step was to discover what there is to be forgiven among women. Such things must now be raised and invented because I am going to tell about feminine forgiveness in story form. The things to be forgiven are grave errors and violent misdemeanors, but the point was less the thing to be forgiven than the nature and quality of forgiveness among women—which is to say friendship among women. What one puts up with in a friendship is determined by the emotional value of the relationship. But Sula is not (simply) about friendship between women but between black women, a qualifying term the artistic responsibilities of which are what goes on before I ever approach the page. Before the act of writing, before the clean yellow legal pad or the white bond are the principles that inform the idea of writing.
"


message 28: by Carissa (new)

Carissa McCray | 26 comments It seems to me that Part II mirrors Part I. That’s all about Part I.

In the two opening chapters, we see destruction and desire to live. Medallion is being transformed and Shadrack promotes National Suicide Day. I think the pairing of both of those, along with other instances in the book, was to show how we can destroy our own lives because we thought we needed or loved something else.


message 29: by Adrienna (last edited Mar 07, 2020 01:41PM) (new)

Adrienna (adriennaturner) | 585 comments Columbus wrote: "Monica wrote: "Just finished Sula and enjoyed it! For me, it didn't displace my Morrison favorites, however I find Morrison to be an amazing author who somehow manages to articulate feelings and em..."

1. Beloved (loved it), 4 to 5 stars
2. Bluest Eye (enjoyed it but heart-wrenching), 4 stars
3. Sula (tied with Bluest Eye), 4 stars.

*Couldn't read Song of Solomon, and haven't read Sula....

Now that I've read Sula; it had some similarities like in Bluest Eye. Eva hated her husband and it saved her to have such a hatred, then Mrs. Breedlove hated her husband and lived for it, asking Jesus not to be the Redeemer but the Judge. Both in Ohio, except Bluest Eye in 1940s as Sula in the 1920s to 50s or so. Poorest Urban communities.


message 30: by ColumbusReads (last edited Feb 12, 2020 12:04AM) (new)

ColumbusReads (coltrane01) | 3713 comments Mod
Entire book open for discussion


message 31: by B. P. (new)

B. P. Rinehart (ken_moten) | 34 comments The magical realism and the dynamic between the town and Sula were amusing to me. The idea of what Morrison is suggesting and the idea of it is interesting. This book is, as she says, an examination of how black women are friends with each other and how they forgive each other.

Here's my review of the full book: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 32: by Mekiva (new)

Mekiva | 56 comments This is my first time to participate in this group, so forgive me if I don’t do this correctly. I believe there is a lot to unpack in this book, but I’d like to start with the character of Eva. What are your reactions to her as a woman, a mother, her role in the community, her relationships with others? What do think of her?

Also, I’d like to hear what you think of Hannah’s comments about loving Sula but not liking her? I feel like this in some part was freeing to Sula but also changed the trajectory of her life and self-view.


message 33: by B. P. (new)

B. P. Rinehart (ken_moten) | 34 comments Mekiva wrote: "Eva. What are your reactions to her as a woman, a mother, her role in the community, her relationships with others? What do think of her?

Also, I’d like to hear what you think of Hannah’s comments about loving Sula but not liking her? I feel like this in some part was freeing to Sula but also changed the trajectory of her life and self-view."


Eva Peace is this novel's variation of an archetype of Toni Morrison's work: the eccentric matriarch. In Song of Solomon we have Pilate Dead, in Beloved we have Baby Suggs. Eva is the first showing of what is to come with Sula. She tries to work in the rules of society, but she is punished and humiliated anyway so she starts to rebuke convention--not as extreme as her daughter and granddaughter, but it still makes her stand-out among the other women of the town.

I think that Hannah's sentiment is actually one of the most normal things about her (lots of folks feel this way about loved ones--and enemies), but of course the way Sula took it set the tone for the rest of the book. We don't know if she would become the town Ubermensch if not for Hannah's comments (my thought is that she would have turned out the same eventually), but those comments and Hannah's subsequent death was like her last "liberation" from any pretense to living in community with other human beings in a meaningful way.


message 34: by Monica (new)

Monica (monicae) | 460 comments Kathleen wrote: "Monica wrote: "When I finished Sula, the book that came to mind for me was another LFPC monthly that Morrison perhaps influenced. The excellent Augustown by [author:Kei Miller|70725...

Definitely, Monica. Another favorite! Do you think it's the magic, or something more?"


I think I was moved by the affects of one event on the entire town. Also the presence of magical realism.


message 35: by Monica (last edited Feb 15, 2020 07:47AM) (new)

Monica (monicae) | 460 comments Mekiva wrote: "This is my first time to participate in this group, so forgive me if I don’t do this correctly. I believe there is a lot to unpack in this book, but I’d like to start with the character of Eva. What are your reactions to her as a woman, a mother, her role in the community, her relationships with others? What do think of her?"

Haha!! You are doing right Mekiva! Jump right in!! My thoughts about Eva Peace were that she was the neighborhood matriarch. She was a hard woman who had been battered by the system and culture and men. The loss of her leg was likely the only way she could care for her children after her husband left. That is an amazingly high price to pay to be able to care for your family. She was angry at the world and that simmering fire was present throughout the novel. She also had a big heart and seemed to try to help whatever children she could, even if she couldn't foster enough love for her own children...especially her daughters. Those times were difficult (after the reconstruction in the Jim Crow South in the 1920s) for blacks period. For a women left on her own to raise 3 kids...darn near impossible. I think the magical realism with her was the strongest. Of course with her children catching fire inadvertantly, but also for me, she seemed to have a epic version of mind control where she'd give you a nickname and that is suddenly how you acted for the rest of your life.

Hannah for me was the embodiement of Eva's unintended consequences. Almost like an adult Percola in The Bluest Eye, she didn't seem to have much self worth. Eva too busy trying to take care of everyone, didn't have the energy(?), gumption(?), awareness(?) to make sure that her children had that foundation. And that is a theme in Morrison's works (that I've read) that when the parents don't provide a foundation of self worth, the children are broken from the start. Hannah seemed like her only contribution to the world was uncomplicated sex which she provided for free. She seemed to value herself so little, that she had nothing to pass on to her daughter Sula.


message 36: by Erin (new)

Erin (erinm31) | 22 comments Hello! I’m starting rather later again as I was waiting on a copy from the library and then finishing some other books first. This is the first book I’m reading by Toni Morrison. (In my defense, such as it is, I am quite behind on classics generally, but I am working to finally rectify that!)

I have several chapters yet to read in part one and am about to start 1922. I’m still processing the ending of that last chapter... The decision to take a life is one thing already but then to do so in such a manner... Why not something more quiet, quick, merciful as much as such a thing could be construed, and without the possibility of burning down everything or leaving strong implications of murder... I am sure I am thinking about it too rationally and or literally... but while I can imagine Eva was in a place to care about the consequences, it is difficult for me to wrap my head around the first...


message 37: by B. P. (new)

B. P. Rinehart (ken_moten) | 34 comments Hey Erin, you are right on time...better late than never. As to the passage you are referencing just read on. Eva actually explains why she did what she did in the beginning of part 2...but by that time it will seem more trivial compared the main action of the book. I won't say you will agree with Eva's reasoning, but she gives you a reason.


message 38: by Erin (last edited Feb 18, 2020 05:21PM) (new)

Erin (erinm31) | 22 comments B. P. wrote: "Hey Erin, you are right on time...better late than never. As to the passage you are referencing just read on. Eva actually explains why she did what she did in the beginning of part 2...but by that..."

Thank you! I haven’t started part 2 yet, but Eva did give an explanation a few chapters later (1923) and while indeed I don’t agree with Eva’s reasoning, it certainly helps to understand what it was. And I am getting the sense that both Eva and her granddaughter Sula tend to dramatic action when they act.

I had a greater shock when the boy called “Chicken Little” flew into the river and neither of the girls made a move to help him! Indeed, they expected him to surface and elsewhere in the river, boys were swimming, so it’s not like it was rapids or something, yet neither went after him or called for help or anything... And not like they were in shock as they had the presence to worry about anyone saw...

I don’t mean to sound critical! I think it is the way it is the abruptness and detachment with which terrible things happen, since so far the story has been told more than experienced through any of the characters, with some exceptions, or so that is how it has felt to me.


message 39: by ColumbusReads (new)

ColumbusReads (coltrane01) | 3713 comments Mod
Happy Birthday Toni Morrison!

The Pieces I Am Documentary trailer:

This artful and intimate meditation on the legendary storyteller examines her life, her works and the powerful themes she has confronted throughout her literary career.


https://youtu.be/NFsrnccKHQ8


message 40: by [deleted user] (new)

Hi Erin, Sula and Nel, I think, are terribly fearful about what happened to Chicken Little. Sula seems especially afraid. While Nel comforts Sula, she makes it known that 'you did it, not me.' Sula immediately seeks help by running up to Shad's house. Where he lives or how he lives shocked me. It is neat and orderly whereas his mind is so disorderly. It is a great contrast. What puzzled me is Shad's one word "always.' What did he mean by it? What angered me is the bargeman's reaction. He finds Chicken Little's body. He very quickly makes known his cruel assumptions about the colored race or black race or Negro race. One, we don't love or care for our children. Two, we, black people, kill each other. Oddly, after all these years, these ugly thoughts have not become foreign or lost to the pages of History. Either whispered or boldly spoken the words hurt. Leaving people who do not know us to imagine that we have not the ability to feel pain emotionally or physically like other groups.


message 41: by William (new)

William (be2lieve) | 1256 comments Mod
Just finished this short novel and Morrison continues to blow me away. With an economy of words she has conjured up enough to fill 3-4 novels written by lesser talents.
There's a bit of looking back at the past in the last couple chapters by Nel and Sula. What surprised me most is that both seem to have forgotten (or purposely buried) the Chicken Little incident. Of all the events in their very eventful lives, I would have thought that this weighed heaviest.


message 42: by B. P. (new)

B. P. Rinehart (ken_moten) | 34 comments Can't say for Sula, but Nel has definitly done her best to "drown-out" the memory of Chicken Little, but old Eva wasn't letting her off the hook in the epilogue.


message 43: by Erin (last edited Feb 18, 2020 05:22PM) (new)

Erin (erinm31) | 22 comments Bloom wrote: "Hi Erin, Sula and Nel, I think, are terribly fearful about what happened to Chicken Little. Sula seems especially afraid. While Nel comforts Sula, she makes it known that 'you did it, not me.' Sula..."

Thank you for sharing your thoughts on that section, Bloom! I confess the scene shocked me and I wanted Sula or Nel to rush after Chicken, like Eva diving out of a second story window to try to get to Hannah to save her. But I have thankfully never been in any situation remotely alike to judge how one would react. I wasn’t surprised by the neatness of Shadrack’s home as he seems to very much need order and predictability with everything in it’s place, but I too was puzzled by his reaction to Sula and what he meant by “Always.” I think that he didn’t see what happened to Chicken Little as that seems to be the very thing he has tried to construct his life to guard against, any unexpected encounters with death. I don’t know how he would have reacted, but I don’t think he could have remained calm as he seemed.


message 44: by Ella (new)

Ella (ellamc) | 219 comments B. P. wrote: "Can't say for Sula, but Nel has definitly done her best to "drown-out" the memory of Chicken Little, but old Eva wasn't letting her off the hook in the epilogue."

This! My thoughts exactly. As for rating Toni Morrison's work, it's impossible for me. The only thing I can say is that I was so excited when audiobooks came about and she read all of her own works... until I tried to listen to them. I feel horrible saying this, but I adore her books on the page, and I had real trouble even finishing one via audio. Dunno why - maybe it was that I'd already read the books, and I had my own way of "hearing" them.

In any event, I seem to be one of the very few who rate The Bluest Eye as highly as I do. Even Morrison has said the book is "flawed." I loved it, and it was my introduction to her, so maybe that's why.


message 45: by B. P. (new)

B. P. Rinehart (ken_moten) | 34 comments I think another thing that throws people off about Morrison is her influences--namely William Faulkner, Chinua Achebe, and Gabriel García Márquez. If you aren't familiar with modernist literature and magical realism, Morrison's work is going to feel weird. I barely noticed a lot of the stuff folks have been bringing-up because I was familiar with works like The Sound and the Fury and One Hundred Years of Solitude so when certain things like dreams or particularly violent episodes would happen I knew they were callbacks to GGM or Faulkner.


message 46: by William (new)

William (be2lieve) | 1256 comments Mod
B. P. wrote: "Can't say for Sula, but Nel has definitly done her best to "drown-out" the memory of Chicken Little, but old Eva wasn't letting her off the hook in the epilogue."

Right. Eva must have somehow known about the drowning all along. But when Nel asks her how she could have she claims that Plum told her...A little mystery to end the book with.


message 47: by Erin (last edited Feb 18, 2020 05:22PM) (new)

Erin (erinm31) | 22 comments B. P. wrote: "I think another thing that throws people off about Morrison is her influences--namely William Faulkner, Chinua Achebe, and Gabriel García Márquez. If you aren't familiar with modernist literature a..."

Thank you for pointing this out! I have not yet read any of those and, looking into it further, found I have not read any modernist works at all. It explains why I have felt rather disoriented reading Sula, not that I dislike it but it has been quite different than I had expected.


message 48: by Erin (new)

Erin (erinm31) | 22 comments Just finished reading Sula and still processing my thoughts on it. Some parts came to make sense or take on additional perspectives I felt while some instances and characters, I find myself wondering what they added to the narrative. I do wish that there had been more scenes between the characters, and especially Sula and Nel. I could not feel the loss of their friendship when I had not felt it to begin with, but mostly been told about it. I don’t know if that is just a personal preference, but to me the most powerful scenes are when I feel am there with the characters, not being told what happened by a more distant narrator. For instance, while I don’t really understand Shadrack’s place in the story, I did like the chapter that introduced him as I felt it really conveyed his state of mind well and I could feel his anxiety and how lost he was. Now I did enjoy some of the chapters giving overviews of characters, especially Eva’s, but would have preferred if more of the story had been with the characters and their POV after that. It could be that I am missing some points here and I have no frame of reference in modernist literature, but I felt this distance prevented me from having a connection with any of the characters; the scenes of Sula’s death and Nel’s revelation at the end of the book were well done I thought but did not move me I think because of what did and did not come before.


message 49: by Adrienna (new)

Adrienna (adriennaturner) | 585 comments Monica wrote: "Mekiva wrote: "This is my first time to participate in this group, so forgive me if I don’t do this correctly. I believe there is a lot to unpack in this book, but I’d like to start with the charac..."

I have to agree with Hannah in a similar essence of Pecola in Bluest Eye. To add, Eva hated her husband or man as much as Mrs. Breedlove hated her husband; both women thrived and lived for it. In Bluest Eye, Mrs. Breedlove quoted in so many words, "[Mr. Breedlove] didn't need Jesus the Redeemer but the Judge." as for Eva, she stated (paraphrased), "the hate she lived for."


message 50: by Adrienna (new)

Adrienna (adriennaturner) | 585 comments William wrote: "Just finished this short novel and Morrison continues to blow me away. With an economy of words she has conjured up enough to fill 3-4 novels written by lesser talents.
There's a bit of looking ba..."


I may not gain the full perspective from the author's view on this part; I'll take a stab at it. From what I gather, they lived in the "bottoms" which from my taking is the lowest of the low. As someone stated before in a passage, they were girls; black. [Further along, even Nel asked why Sula did what she did, and she said you are black and a woman; Sula responded, "doesn't that make me like a Black Man."] Meaning, they have lost their senses or care. They weren't necessarily judged or locked away for watching/seeing the boy drown. Sadly, it appeared, it was just another one dead.

Today, we may see someone dying, drowning for that matter, and people are so desensitized to it, instead of helping, they will pull out their phones and video it to upload on social media.


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