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Getting Started > Getting Started and Helpful Tips

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message 1: by the_rabid_snail, Suo Jure Marchioness (last edited Jan 04, 2021 08:19PM) (new)

the_rabid_snail | 242 comments Mod
Below are some instructions on what to do first upon joining the group and some helpful information. At the bottom is some different information about various aspects of the Victorian Era for anyone interested. It is not required reading, but you may find it useful.

Getting Started

The most important thing to do first is to read through the plot thread and the rules thread. Once you have done so, you are free to make however many characters you wish. Simply check with the Character Form thread to ensure you have included all the necessary information and post them in Approval when you are finished with them and wait for a mod to approve them before rping.
If you would like to create one of the Lockwoods, you must post in the Character Claim thread first to make sure there are available spots. All important information related to the Lockwood siblings can be found in that thread and the Plot thread. There are no claims for suitors or servants since there is no limit to the number of those that can be created. However, please visit the Title Claim thread when creating a suitor.
After your character or characters are approved, you may post in the Roleplay Requests thread to find a partner to rp with. There will also be a number of events in the group that will be open for anyone who wants participate in them.

Helpful Tips

If you have any questions, check the Questions/Suggestions/Help thread first to see if anyone else has asked the same question. If not, just ask me, and I will be happy to help however I can!

All suitors in this rp are from noble families, and they will all have a title. Below is a guide of the various nobility titles in Victorian England from the highest ranking to the lowest ranking.

Duke
Duchess
Marquess
Marchioness
Earl
Countess (the female counterpart of an Earl)
Viscount
Viscountess
Baron
Baroness

Eldest sons would be considered one rank below their father, and every son after would be a rank lower than the eldest brother. A duke's eldest son would be a marquess, and the second son would be an earl for example. Say the duke's eldest son (the marquess) got married. His wife would not be considered a marchioness, but she would be nearly as high. Once the son inherited the title of duke from his father, she would become a duchess. Daughters of the nobility stand just below their eldest brother's wife.
After barons and baronesses, it gets really confusing with the lesser nobility and appointment holders, including knights, baronets, esquires, the different chancellors, and many others, but most of that is irrelevant since the Lockwoods are not interested in marrying their children to anyone so low-ranking and didn't invite them.

All suitors are non-magical. I may make some exceptions to this rule, but I will not make many.

When creating characters, please choose names appropriate for the time period. There will be a list of various names in spoilers in the bottom of this post for anyone who needs ideas.

Other Information about the Victorian Era (More will be added later)

Timeline (please note that this is not an exhaustive list)

The first modern railway in the British Empire is established in 1838, but during 1846 the London-Birmingham Railway combines with a few other lines to form the London and North Western Railway. By the late 1800's, it is the largest joint-stock company, and millions of people and goods are transported on trains each year.

In 1851, Queen Victoria's husband Prince Albert engineers the first World's Fair called the Great Exhibition in London's Crystal Palace. Over 10,000 exhibitors display the world's technological wonders, and approximately 6 million people attend the fair during the six months it is open from May to October.

The Vaccination Act is passed in 1853, which makes it mandatory for parents to vaccinate any children born after August 1, 1853 against smallpox. Anyone who fails to do so is either imprisoned or fined.

The Crimean War starts in late 1853 and ends in early 1856. Russia loses to the combined powers of Britain, France, Sardinia, and the Ottoman Empire, and the war mostly starts because of Russian demands for protection of Orthodox subjects in the Ottoman Empire and because of a dispute between Russia and France over privileges and rights of the Russian Orthodox and Roman Catholic churches in Palestine. Florence Nightingale (the most famous nurse) helps reduce the death count by two-thirds by insisting on more sanitary conditions, and The Charge of the Light Brigade is written by Alfred, Lord Tennyson to commemorate a battle in the war.

Queen Victoria's husband dies in 1861 of typhoid.

Alexander Graham Bell receives his patent for the telephone in 1876, but they were not common in households until the 20th century. Mostly they were strictly used for business in the Victorian Era, and even wealthy families did not own one in the home.

In 1876, India names Queen Victoria as empress. They have been under British rule since 1858.

Fashion

Generally Victorian fashion trends emphasized beauty and elegance in simplicity.

Usually what looked like dresses were separate bodices and skirts. This allowed for a greater variety of outfits. Most women's clothing was in various shades of blues, reds, and purples during the 1880's. While previously bustles were large, they were lower and slimmer now, and sleeves were more fitted as well. Often women's skirts had long trains in the back.
Starting in the 1870's the tea gown was introduced. It was socially acceptable to wear during the day by the 1880's, and they grew more elaborate as time went on. Usually they had narrow skirts and were often worn without a corset. Tea gowns were introduced by the Aesthetic Movement.

The period just prior had hairstyles that were very complex and pompous, but the Victorian era popularized simple yet elegant hairdos. Ringlets and larger curls were steadily popular all throughout. Then came the knotting of the chignon at the nape of the neck or a little higher often accompanied by a few curls. After that the Marcel wave became a trend, and then pompadours became popular soon after. People also started adding fake hair pieces for volume and height. And then the Titus style took over.
Hats were always popular, and flowers, ribbons, and plumes were the favorite accessories. The Empress of Austria first popularized the use of flowers in hairstyles if I'm remembering correctly.

Authors and Artists


Victorian Names

People in the Victorian Era usually named their children after British royalty, people in the Bible, religious figures, or famous literary characters or authors. Oftentimes, girls were also named after jewels or virtues, and it became common practice for surnames to be used as first names. Many children had their mother's maiden name as either a first or middle name. Below are lists divided by gender and ordered alphabetically of the most common and several somewhat uncommon names. I actually went to the trouble of ensuring that every name below was used during Queen Victoria's reign.

Victorian Names for Boys
(view spoiler)

Victorian Names for Girls
(view spoiler)

(view spoiler)


message 2: by the_rabid_snail, Suo Jure Marchioness (last edited Jan 16, 2020 02:31PM) (new)

the_rabid_snail | 242 comments Mod
Titles

A peer is any person who holds one of five possible titles and owns the estate(s) bestowed upon him by his direct ancestor or by the monarch. The five titles in order of rank from highest to lowest are listed below. Their female versions are listed directly after the male ones.

1. Duke
Duchess
2. Marquess
Marchioness
3. Earl
Countess
4. Viscount
Viscountess
5. Baron
Baroness

Dukes are the rarest title, and the most common title is that of Baron. Earls are the second most plentiful, and Viscounts and Marquesses are less numerous, though still more common than Dukes.

Eldest sons would be considered one rank below their father, and every son after would be a rank lower than the eldest brother. A duke's eldest son would be a marquess, and the second son would be an earl for example. Say the duke's eldest son (the marquess) got married. His wife would not be considered a marchioness, but she would be nearly as high. Once the son inherited the title of duke from his father, she would become a duchess. Daughters of the nobility stand just below their eldest brother's wife.
After barons and baronesses, it gets really confusing with the lesser nobility and appointment holders, including knights, baronets, esquires, the different chancellors, and many others, but most of that is irrelevant since the Lockwoods are not interested in marrying their children to anyone so low-ranking and didn't invite them. Knights and Baronets are not peers.

Dukes and Duchesses are addressed as "Your Grace" by social inferiors and "Duke" or "Duchess" by social equals. I'm not completely sure what 'social equals' means (unfortunately there is not much information on the term), but for the purposes of this rp 'social equals' will be taken to mean anyone who is a Duke in their own right. All courtesy title holders or peers who hold titles lesser than Duke in their own right will not count as social equals.
Courtesy title holders are the wife and relatives of a peer (as defined in the beginning of the post). A wife of a peer may be called a peeress, but she does not hold her title in her own right. Only those who hold titles in their own rights are peers (those who have inherited a title and estate(s) from their direct ancestor or the monarch.)
All courtesy title holders other than Duchesses and all peers other than Dukes are addressed as "Lord [title]" or "Lady [title]." For instance, if Henry Ford is the Earl of Harrington, he would be addressed as Lord Harrington, not Lord Ford.

Dukes are always referred to officially by "Duke of [name of their dukedom]."
Marquesses are generally referred to officially by "Marquess of [name of their marquessate]." There are some exceptions to this rule, but these are only marquesses whose surname is identical to the name of their marquessate. In that case, their official title would be "Marquess [name of their marquessate]" with no "of."
Earls are usually referred to officially by "Earl of [name of their earldom]." Like in the case of Marquesses, there are a few exceptions. Occasionally some earls whose surname is the same as the name of their earldom may be referred to as "Earl [name of their earldom]" with no "of." Even if an earl shares the same name as his earldom, he is normally referred to in the format of the first example.
Viscounts are slightly different from the other three ranks. They are never formally referred to as "Viscount of [name of viscountcy]." They are typically referred to as "Viscount [surname]," but often (thought not always) a territorial addition is made to the title, which would look like this: "Viscount [surname] of [name of viscountcy]." Sometimes they are also referred to as "Viscount [name of viscountcy]" even if the surname and the name of the viscountcy are not the same.
Barons work similarly. They are not ever referred to as "Baron of [name of barony]." Usually they are always referred to as "Baron [surname] of [name of barony]" and nothing else.

Please keep in mind that under most circumstances they are addressed as "Lord [title]" and "Lady [title]." The above rules are official titles only. Most peers, peeresses, and other courtesy title holders do not call each other by their full titles.
Close friends and family members may address each other by title only if they wish. For example, friends or family of Lord Harrington may call him Harrington, even though his given name is Henry Ford. When he corresponds, he will sign his name simply as Harrington. If he has a wife, she will sign her first initial and then her husband's title (in this case, Harrington.)

Although this seems complex enough, there are a ridiculous amount of other rules that complicate things, but I won't go into them here. I should note that in certain peerages some peers are more likely to hold multiple titles, but for the sake of simplicity, we will stick to one title per character.


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