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THE WITCH'S DAUGHTER Brackston > Continuity and backstory

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message 1: by Dawn (new)

Dawn Stowell (dawnstowell) Certainly, I am intrigued already with Brackston's voice. Why? because it is elemental, earthy and phenomenological. I am beginning with the first "The Witches Daughter," in this stand-alone series to better approach a deeper understanding of what it is that so deeply appeals to me.

Without giving away the plot or exposing any spoilers are there any themes, recurring symbols or motifs that would help me to focus my attention?

Thanks <:-)


message 2: by Dawn (new)

Dawn Stowell (dawnstowell) Found this so far: "One of the themes of The Witch’s Daughter is identity, and trying to pinpoint what makes us who
we really are. Is there a pivotal moment or event in which Elizabeth realizes magic is an inextricable part of herself?" https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...


message 3: by Katie (new)

Katie (katieperov) | 102 comments Mod
Heather wrote: "Certainly, I am intrigued already with Brackston's voice. Why? because it is elemental, earthy and phenomenological. I am beginning with the first "The Witches Daughter," in this stand-alone series..."

Brackston definitely has a distinctive voice. And I agree that identity is definitely a strong theme throughout Elizabeth's story. In "The Witch's Daughter" and even more so in "The Return of the Witch" I think that the concept of "belonging" ( or maybe what it means to seek belonging) runs through Elizabeth and Tegan's storylines. I guess this makes sense- I think all people struggle to find a space/place/work/people/whatever where they feel they "belong" and I imagine that being something "different," as Elizabeth certainly is, would sharpen your sense of being something aside while also sharpening your desire to belong somewhere. Could "belonging" or the journey of seeking belonging be a motif? I don't know, I suppose so. In any case, it may be an interesting discussion point/focus as you read.


message 4: by Katie (new)

Katie (katieperov) | 102 comments Mod
Heather wrote: "Found this so far: "One of the themes of The Witch’s Daughter is identity, and trying to pinpoint what makes us who
we really are. Is there a pivotal moment or event in which Elizabeth realizes mag..."


I think that when Elizabeth uses her magic to save herself from prosecution (I'm trying to be vague as not to spoil anything for anyone) is pretty powerful- she chooses to finally use what's innately a part of who she is to save herself. Subsequently she has to face what she is and her capabilities and make some decisions about them and herself.


message 5: by Dawn (last edited Jan 13, 2020 11:48AM) (new)

Dawn Stowell (dawnstowell) Katie, I agree that belonging is an important part of identity. Then, I will also be looking for the contrast of alienation and ostracization as they are the opposite of belonging. Thanks for pointing me in the right direction :)


message 6: by Katie (new)

Katie (katieperov) | 102 comments Mod
Heather wrote: "Katie, I agree that belonging is an important part of identity. Then, I will also be looking for the contrast of alienation and ostracization as they are the opposite of belonging. Thanks for point..."

Absolutely- I'm excited to see what you think of these books!


message 7: by Dawn (new)

Dawn Stowell (dawnstowell) The following are quotes related to theme of belonging.

My friendless state is not a choice but a necessity

To be a recluse is to be mysterious beyond the endurance of villagers of this modern age.

I saw now how solitary the girl must be. She did not fit in. She was an outsider.

I was unused to having anyone inside my home.

Could it be that I have at last found a safe haven?


message 8: by Katie (new)

Katie (katieperov) | 102 comments Mod
Absolutely-


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