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Shades of Milk and Honey (Glamourist Histories, #1)
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What Else Are You Reading? > Shades of Milk & Honey

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message 1: by Andrew (new)

Andrew Knighton | 158 comments I just finished reading Mary Robinette Kowal's 'Shades of Milk & Honey, which I thoroughly enjoyed. It was great to read a fantasy that, for the most part, was driven by subtle social conflicts, and where magic mostly existed as an art form rather than as a weapon.

Anybody else read it, and what did you think? And do you have any recommendations for other fantasy novels that deploy magic in unusual ways?


Ivi_kiwi | 85 comments I am currently reading it and i am enjoying it. In fact i am taking my time reading is, as it is one of those books where you should cuddle up in your favourite chair and sip some lovely beverage and not gobble it down like a hamburger in a snack bar. :)


kvon | 559 comments I've read four of the books in the series--the focus varies in the books between the arts and the social background. You don't get the same book twice with Kowal!

Nina Kiriki Hoffman does interesting contemporary things with magic in the context of family. I really enjoyed A Fistful of Sky.


Sandi (Sandikal) | 1212 comments I'm up to date with the series. I read the first one on my Nook and listened to the audiobooks for the rest. The audio is narrated by Mary Robinette Kowal and she's fabulous. I think it's a series that's really enhanced by listening to the audio.


message 5: by Andrew (new)

Andrew Knighton | 158 comments Ivi_kiwi wrote: "and not gobble it down like a hamburger in a snack bar. :) "


Nice metaphor, and seems particularly apt for a story about enjoying the finer creative things in life!


message 6: by Andrew (last edited Nov 28, 2014 01:20PM) (new)

Andrew Knighton | 158 comments kvon wrote: "I've read four of the books in the series--the focus varies in the books between the arts and the social background. You don't get the same book twice with Kowal!"

That's one of the things I'm looking forward to - I've heard Kowal talk about the books on the Writing Excuses podcast, and it sounds like I'm going to get an interesting range of stories in the same universe.

I have to admit, I thought the climax of the first one took a bit of a jump in tone, but while it seemed out of place there, I think I could quite happily read a whole book along those lines.


message 7: by Andrew (new)

Andrew Knighton | 158 comments Sandi wrote: "The audio is narrated by Mary Robinette Kowal and she's fabulous."

I can well believe it - I've heard her on podcasts and she has a great voice, as well as the confidence to use it well. She's one of those immensely talented people you can't help but admire.


Joanna Chaplin | 1175 comments I liked it all except the end, where the tone and pace of the book all seemed to jump suddenly. Enough that I decided not to immediately proceed to the rest right away.


Elizabeth Morgan (sayselizabeth) | 156 comments Joanna I felt the same. Although, having read a bunch of Austen right before I picked up SoMaH, I also felt like it was a poor man's imitation of Austen. If I'd come at it from another sort of book, I reckon I would have liked it a bit more. The (view spoiler) at the end put me off picking up more, but I also didn't like Jane and the guy she ends up with enough to find out what happened next.


message 10: by Andrew (new)

Andrew Knighton | 158 comments Elizabeth and Joanna, I also felt that the ending seemed out of place, but it didn't affect my enjoyment to the same extent - I still enjoyed it, just not as much as I'd hoped. Having now read the sequel, I thought that was more consistent, but that I missed the distinct Austen-esque atmosphere of Shades. Not sure which I liked more, but I'm still enjoying the series.


Joanna Chaplin | 1175 comments I honestly like the latter ones better. In many ways, Valour and Vanity is my favorite because it took the characters in a direction I hadn't expected at all, and the characters grew immensely because of it.


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