Gay fiction/non-fiction discussion

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Book Topics > What GLBT Book Are You Reading?

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message 1: by Ashley (new)

Ashley (readerandwriter) Is anyone reading any GLBT books at the moment?

I'm not reading any at the moment, but I do plan to get back on my Lesbian Romance Novels. It has been quite awhile since I read one.


message 2: by [deleted user] (new)

Right now I am reading memoirs. I just finished Alone in the Trenches and I plan to read Billy Bean's book Going the Other Way soon. I am also reading Without You by Anthony Rapp from Rent.


message 3: by Sandy (last edited Jun 09, 2008 08:37PM) (new)

Sandy (sandushinka) | 4 comments Currently reading A Time to Embrace: Same-Gender Relationships in Religion, Law, and Politics. Interesting (and affirming) look at gay marriage from a Presby theologian and lawyer.


message 4: by Helen (new)

Helen (savanah) | 2 comments i'm curently reading lady cablis really interesting. How her family came to except her as well as her excepting herself awesome !!
The lady chablis
bythedore bouloukos.


message 5: by Ashley (new)

Ashley (readerandwriter) I'm currently reading a memoir by Craig Seymour called "All I Could Bare: My Life in the Strip Clubs of Gay Washington D.C.


message 6: by Robin (new)

Robin (therobinreardon) | 47 comments I just finished Kevin Sessums’ book, MISSISSIPPI SISSY, his memoir of growing up gay in the south. It’s beautifully written and reads like a novel. Also very touching. My only criticisms might be that the timeline skips around rather too much and that Sessums seems in love with his writing style (not a bad thing in itself, I just don't want it to be obvious when I'm reading). There were a few minor grammatical errors that surprised me, given his otherwise excellent command of the written word.

And if I might be allowed a little shameless self-promotion, I’ve written two books about gay teens, starting with A SECRET EDGE. On the surface, this looks like a coming-out book for a gay 16-year-old track star, a runner, who falls for a high-jumper on his team. But the high-jumper is from India and is obsessed with Gandhi, while the runner carries a switchblade. The story explores the concepts of honesty, violence vs. non-violence, and includes a smattering of Hindu philosophy. I think you'll be pleasantly surprised.

This April my second novel came out (heh). It’s called THINKING STRAIGHT. The main character is Taylor Adams, a Christian, gay teenager whose parents send him to a summer camp designed to straighten him out. Over the course of the story, he manages to figure out how to remain true both to himself and to his religion. He learns to think strategically about religion. He learns that it's all about love, and he does that in a very surprising way.

You can read excerpts from both books on my Web site: http://www.robinreardon.com.


message 7: by [deleted user] (new)

I'm now reading a book called Unchartered Lives by Stanley Siegel and Ed Lowe Jr. It was a little difficult to find (try Amazon sellers and Half.com), but it is very well written thus far. Much of the novel is stanley's story and I think many of us will be able to relate it.


message 8: by Ted (new)

Ted (efcorson) | 414 comments Mod
I found “Boys, Lost and Found” by Charles Castillo completely engrossing. Casillo has written a really engaging collection of short stories, interspersed with some factual first-person narratives. His writing is crisp, entertaining, and a quick read. His portraiture is always astute, whether describing a horny number in a bar, a true love object, or a group of queens at a Starbucks -- hot young guys who are growing older by the minute. The protagonists are young men. The antagonists are their older well-heeled lovers whom they crave. And, the result? Well, no spoilers here! Themes in the stories include gay sex, love, self-love, loneliness, self-esteem, kindness, decency, humiliation, aging, and the effect of glam lifestyles on gay relationships. At heart, though, “Boys, Lost and Found” is really about longing, in the sense of irrepressible, uncontrollable desire.

Some favorite lines:

“This was only sex, I tried to reason. Only another man and his body. But I couldn’t help myself. I had been dead. Now I was alive.”

“I have a tendency to think too much. This is something that, after much thought, I’ve concluded is wrong.”

“The one you love first always makes an imprint. All the others that come after will have to, in some ways, match up to the first one.”



message 9: by Ashley (new)

Ashley (readerandwriter) I am now reading "My Miserable,Lonely, Lesbian Pregnancy" by Andrea Askowtiz


message 10: by Gabi (new)

Gabi (treehugger) I am about to read "Kitchen"


message 11: by Jon (last edited Jul 19, 2008 06:58AM) (new)

Jon (jon_michaelsen) | 37 comments I just finished Christopher Rice's, Blind Fall. If you like a fast-paced, suspenseful, murder-mystery, Chris's lastest is excellent - ironically the protagonist is straight, yet the novel is as much about acceptance as it is about solving a murder.

Here is a blurb posted on Amazon.com

Home from Iraq, John pays a visit to his former captain, only to discover the captain has been gruesomely murdered. John pursues a strange man he sees running from the scene, but he discovers that Alex Martin is not the murderer. Alex is, in fact, the former captain's secret male lover and the killer's intended next victim.

When it becomes clear that local law enforcement has direct connections to the murder itself, John realizes that to repay his debt of honor, he must teach Alex Martin how to protect himself, even if that means teaching Alex to kill. In the process, John confronts the painful truth about the younger brother he was unable to protect and the older sister he always felt he failed.

Blind Fall is a story of honor and integrity, of turning failure into victory. It is a stunning departure for Christopher Rice: the story of two men, one a Marine, one gay, who must unite to avenge the death of the man they both loved--one as a brother-in-arms, one as a lover--and to survive.







message 12: by John (new)

John Finishing up Swish: My Quest to be the Gayest Person Ever by Joel Derfner. It's incredibly well-written, though the author tends to be just a tad on the shallow side.


message 13: by Ted (new)

Ted (efcorson) | 414 comments Mod
Hey, John, about Swish: My Quest to be the Gayest Person Ever. The abstract for it sounds pretty cool, but there's nothing like a nice succint review! Thanks!

Ted


message 14: by Ted (new)

Ted (efcorson) | 414 comments Mod
Hi, John. The Goodreads page for Blind Fall doesn't say much about it. Maybe you can get Scribner's (or Goodreads) to publish your excellent review.

Ted


message 15: by John (new)

John Ted -- that review came with the book -- I'll write mine in a day or so when I finish the final chapter.


message 16: by Troy (new)

Troy Has anybody read At Swim, Two Boys? I was thinking of reading it before school starts...I've had it on my shelf for years :)


message 17: by Ted (new)

Ted (efcorson) | 414 comments Mod
Troy, nope sorry.. but tere are some good reviews of it on here. Btw, happy birthday!


message 18: by [deleted user] (new)

I just finished up with the Screwed Up Life of Charlie the Second. I have reviewed it on here, but I would recommend at least reading it through once. There is not a lot learned from the book, but it is enjoyable and rings true (at least from my own experience).


message 19: by Ashley (new)

Ashley (readerandwriter) I am not reading any GLBT book at the moment but I plan on getting back to those lesbian romance novels. It has been a while.


message 20: by Jason (new)

Jason I'm looking for a good GLBT book, but don't have the money or resources to go out and get one. Any one know of any services, online or off, that could help out? I'd appreciate it.


message 21: by [deleted user] (new)

Jason, what type of book are you looking for? I have a few that I was going to sell back to Half Price Books, but I'd be happy to send them your way. I'd much rather someone who is interested get them.


message 22: by [deleted user] (new)

I just read Fledgling Jason Steed. Its tagged as gay on Amazon. Well its not really gay but the young Jason does have a very close freindship with Scott and Todd. They hug, do sleep overs but at age 12 the author is very clever and keeps things hidden between the lines. I am looking forward to the next Jason Steed book.
I try to read books that dont say 'THIS IS A GAY BOOK' on the cover and yet has guys being guys. It would take a very brave author to write a book about under age boys doing what we all do with other boys. I am sure that has gone on for years.



message 23: by Ted (new)

Ted (efcorson) | 414 comments Mod
Austin, have you checked out the Alex Sanchez "Rainbow..."' books? They kinda say "this is a gay book" but they're about guys your age.


message 24: by Christopher (last edited Nov 12, 2008 05:17PM) (new)

Christopher | 4 comments Just starting to read Band Fags, by Frank Anthony Polito. An ode to growing up in the 80's--can't wait to begin.Band Fags!


message 25: by Jeremy (new)

Jeremy (dontyouaskme) | 27 comments For the college-aged guys and gals (like myself) I'd recommend some Christopher Rice. It seems a little lofty at times, but it's not full of the whole "I'm coming out, oh no! What ever will I do?" beginning stuff - the characters happen to be gay, and the stories center on other things.

So.. support your community AND get a different perspective. Woot woot!


message 26: by [deleted user] (new)

Helen wrote: "i'm curently reading lady cablis really interesting. How her family came to except her as well as her excepting herself awesome !!
The lady chablis
bythedore bouloukos."


Oh yes, Lady Chablis is adorable. The book you are referring to is Hiding My Candy The Autobiography of the Grand Empress of Savannah
Hiding My Candy The Autobiography of the Grand Empress of Savannah by Lady Chablis


message 27: by [deleted user] (new)

Robin wrote: "I just finished Kevin Sessums’ book, MISSISSIPPI SISSY, his memoir of growing up gay in the south. It’s beautifully written and reads like a novel. Also very touching. My only criticisms might be t..."

Oh yes, this Tennessee sissy liked "Mississippi Sissy."


message 28: by [deleted user] (new)

Robert wrote: "I just finished up with the Screwed Up Life of Charlie the Second. I have reviewed it on here, but I would recommend at least reading it through once. There is not a lot learned from the book, bu..."

Liked that book as well, an easy read.


message 29: by [deleted user] (new)

John wrote: "Finishing up Swish: My Quest to be the Gayest Person Ever by Joel Derfner. It's incredibly well-written, though the author tends to be just a tad on the shallow side. "

yes, that was a funny book. well, josh derfner has an ivy league education. he has a cute blog, searching for love in manhattan. check it out!


message 30: by Ted (new)

Ted (efcorson) | 414 comments Mod
I'm reading "The Lord Won't Mind." Pretty steamy so far!


message 31: by John (new)

John I recently finished listening to Marc Acito's Attack of the Theater People, which made a good sequel, but I strongly suggest reading How I Paid for College first for context. Jeff Woodman does a terrific job narrating both.


message 32: by [deleted user] (new)

Am reading Lost Prophet The Life and Times of Bayard Rustin... a bit slow at times, but i've been busy with other projects.




message 33: by Collin (new)

Collin Kelley | 17 comments I'm still trying to finish Jeanette Winterson's "The Stone Gods," which I'm loving but there are so many distractions lately!


message 34: by Kevin (new)

Kevin (imkevbo) | 5 comments Not reading any GLBT fiction at the moment, that's only because I finished Cross, James Patterson, and am in the middle of the 10 volume tome, Chronicles of Amber. I've enjoyed Amber, sci-fantasy(?), but 1200 pages is too much time to commit to a book. However, if I remind myself it's truly 10 books in one, it's somewhat more manageable.

I try to read an Amber book, and then pick another selection in between each book. Working so far.

Did that just make any sense?

:o)


message 35: by Ted (new)

Ted (efcorson) | 414 comments Mod
Perfect sense, Kevin!


message 36: by Steven (new)

Steven (stevey) | 3 comments I'm reading A Secret Edge and I'm really enjoying it. Bit adolescent for my tastes, but a nice and easy read for the train ride :)


message 37: by Ted (new)

Ted (efcorson) | 414 comments Mod
Yes, that's on my to-read. Supposed to be a good YA book. Thanks, Steven.


message 38: by Steven (new)

Steven (stevey) | 3 comments Ted, love to know what you think of it. I don't often hear from members who read the same books I do.


message 39: by Ted (new)

Ted (efcorson) | 414 comments Mod
Well, it's about third in line right now! I usually do a review when I'm done a book that I liked... so stay tuned!


message 40: by Collin (new)

Collin Kelley | 17 comments I just picked up the Flannery O'Connor biography, "Flannery," by Brad Gooch. Since I'm a Georgia boy, Flannery is one of our patron saints so I can't wait to hear about her secret, torrid lesbian affair. Hope everyone is enjoying what they're reading.


message 41: by [deleted user] (new)

I have that new biography in my TBR queue. I was surprised by the very complimentary review in NYTimes. Usually, NYTimes is savage towards Gooch. So I hope this biography won't be a mishmash like the Frank O'Hara biography City Poet The Life and Times of Frank O'Hara


message 42: by Robin (new)

Robin (therobinreardon) | 47 comments Steven –

Glad to hear you’re enjoying A SECRET EDGE. When I was writing it, I thought it was a YA book; that was my intention.

I’d read and enjoyed David Levithan’s BOY MEETS BOY and Alex Sanchez’s RAINBOW BOYS. The former was well-written and hit Levithan’s stated objective of depicting a life where it was mostly just fine whatever your sexual orientation, and a gay boy was just a boy who happened to be gay. It was fun to read, but it didn’t surprise me to learn that most of his readers are teen girls; there wasn’t a sex scene from cover to cover. The latter is, of course, the stuff of legends (given Sanchez’s success and phenomenal following), but I could see the agenda written between every two lines. While I applaud his work and agree with his agenda, I didn’t want to write quite the same way.

So I thought I was writing a YA gay teen book that had some grit and some reality, but both my agent and Kensington said it should be marketed as adult. The same thing happened with my second book, THINKING STRAIGHT.

I’m glad, as it happens, because otherwise I think fewer adults would have read it. And I have to say that I get extremely touching e-mail from both general age groups.

Anyway, I like to think of A SECRET EDGE as ... well, as accessible. But if you think it’s YA, I won’t argue with you! ;-)



message 43: by RussBear (last edited Mar 05, 2009 07:57AM) (new)

RussBear I started reading the novel Band Fags! yesterday on my Sony Reader. It’s absolutely halarious! I love the story so far because I was a “band fag” when I was in high school in the ‘80s, too. (I played the trumpet and the French horn.) This is definitely a YA novel with a postive message that's a joy to read, especially if you remember living through the '80s.
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/29...



message 44: by Ted (new)

Ted (efcorson) | 414 comments Mod
I just finished "The Lord Won't Mind." Review tomorrow.


message 45: by Ted (last edited Mar 19, 2009 05:05PM) (new)

Ted (efcorson) | 414 comments Mod
I'm halfway through the YA novel Tale of Two Summers about two 15/16yo boys who are best friends, one gay the other straight. As they're forced to spend their first summer apart, they blog back and forth. It's a departure from a lot of YA lit in that it features two smart and savvy but still naive boys who don't curse every third word. Still, i wonder if even exceptional kids this age, best friends or not, would show as much commitment and compassion. Will review when done. So far, 4 stars teens 14-18.


message 46: by [deleted user] (new)

I'm reading two LGBT books: A Scarecrow's Bible (fiction) and The G Quotient (non-fiction about gay managers/leaders).


message 47: by [deleted user] (new)

Robert wrote: "I'm reading two LGBT books: A Scarecrow's Bible (fiction) and The G Quotient (non-fiction about gay managers/leaders)."

I just finished "A Scarecrow's Bible" by Martin Hyatt and I would definitely recommend it. The book is simple, yet complex at the same time and the author's style transports the reader into the life of the protagonist. It isn't the best book I've ever read, but it is definitely unlike anything else I've read.


message 48: by John (new)

John I just finished Death of a Pirate King by Josh Lanyon - the 4th in his Adrien English murder mystery series. It's definitely better than the 2nd and 3rd ones, but the series has to be read in order for context.


message 49: by Jessi (new)

Jessi Rose (unlivedlife) I'm reading Pages for You A Novel by Sylvia Brownrigg. It's wonderful! I'd definately recommend it to anyone who wants to read a great book!


message 50: by John (new)

John I wanted to mention that I read Boys to Men recently, finding it quite well done (for an anthology). I'd like to see the book on being half of a pair of gay twins that Michael Gardner says he's working on (no, not for salacious reasons!).


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