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Current Events > Human Euthanasia...What is your Opinion?

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message 1: by Sophia (new)

Sophia (pheephyphophum) | 176 comments Mod
I just read this article (warning: shocking pictures)

http://www.news.com.au/story/0,23599,...

The situation is extremely sad as it is, but I personally think it's also sad that she gives the government that much power over her life! I think that if you wanna go, you shouldn't need permission. Definitely have your reasons evaluated, but ultimately that's a personal decision and should be respected.

I wish that she could have made headway with her case because it's painful to think of the suffering that people with a painful illness and terminal prognosis go through. Unlike most people in that situation, she is mobile and not hospitalized. There are people who are not and can't just go to the store to grab a bottle of sleeping pills.

What do you think? It's a personal decision or let the government determine everything about not only your life, but your death as well?

ARTICLE:
A FRENCH court has rejected a request from a 52-year-old severely disfigured former schoolteacher for the right to die, in a case that has stirred much emotion in France.

The high court in Dijon, eastern France, decided to side with the prosecution which argued current legislation does not allow Chantal Sebire's doctor to prescribe lethal drugs.

In her appeal to the court, Ms Sebire said she did not want to endure further pain and subject herself to an irreversible worsening of her condition. She asked the court to allow her doctor to help her end her life.

A mother of three who lives in the Bourgogne region of eastern France, Ms Sebire drew a strong outpour of sympathy when she appealed in a television interview last month for the right to "depart peacefully''.

Before-and-after pictures of the woman, her face severely deformed, have been featured in the press and her account of frightened children who run away at the sight of her has drawn sympathy.

Ms Sebire learnt in 2002 that she had developed an esthesioneuroblastoma, an uncommon malignant tumour in the nasal cavity, which she said has led to "atrocious'' suffering.

"In 2000, I lost the sense of smell and taste ... and I lost my sight in October 2007,'' she said in the television interview.

"One would not allow an animal to go through what I have endured,'' she said before urging President Nicolas Sarkozy to intervene and grant her request.

Commenting on the case, Justice Minister Rachida Dati said last week doctors were not there to prescribe lethal drugs.

Legislation adopted in 2005 allows families to request life-support equipment for a terminally-ill patient be switched off, but does not allow a doctor to take action to end a patient's life.

Mr Sarkozy asked his chief adviser on health issues to contact Ms Sebire and seek a second opinion on her condition.

Ms Sebire has said she will not appeal the decision rendered today and she would find life-terminating drugs through other means.

"I now know how to get my hands on what I need and if I don't get it in France, I will get it elsewhere,'' she said.

Only 200 cases of the disease have been recorded worldwide in two decades.



message 2: by Molly (new)

Molly (mollyhell) It's utterly ridiculous to not allow someone to have control over what is fundamentally THEIRS. Their body, their life.

It's amazing people allow this, but then I have a low opinion of people and their seeming inability to stand up for anything but wanting money and Nintendos.


message 3: by Rhonda (new)

Rhonda Graser (mom2jnd) I don't agree with being able to tell someone it's not their right to choose when to die, but what I understand even less is why she asked for permission? I imagine it would be considered suicide still, so why not just do it? No court is EVER going to grant someone the right to take their own life...and you don't see many people asking. Most people just do it if they feel the need that badly.


message 4: by Rob (new)

Rob (merovigan) There's a disconnect here, I think. This isn't "asking for permission to die" so much as "needing someone's help to die as painlessly as possible."

There's really no such thing as a painless suicide. Suicide, in most all of its forms, is a risky endeavor. If it is done improperly, the result can be disaterous - a case of "the cure being worse than the disease", so to speak.

No, what is at issue here is murder, or its technical definition. Is a doctor who prescribes death a murderer? Well, in my opinion, absolutely yes if the patient has no say in the matter. Even if the patient has a say, it would be criminal for a single doctor to recommend death without requiring the patient to seek psychiatric care, and a second or third opinion.

But in cases such as this, or any number of other situations where a human is suffering moment to moment for years, I have to wonder what right anyone has to say that they must stay here and suffer.

Rhonda, I think you're missing the vast number of sick who cannot, effectively, kill themselves. Further, it takes big BIG reproductive organs (balls or uteruses) to kill yourself. I'm not sure the physche of someone who has been terminally ill for years is up to that, on their own. Further, the fact that it is illegal does block it as an option for many people. Functional blindess, being what it is.


message 5: by Rhonda (new)

Rhonda Graser (mom2jnd) Good point, Rob. I didn't mean to come off as sounding like suicide was no big deal. I didn't consider the fact of dying as painlessly as possible either.


message 6: by Sophia (new)

Sophia (pheephyphophum) | 176 comments Mod
Woman found dead after court rejects euthanasia
Thursday Mar 20 09:51 AEDT

A severely disfigured French woman was found dead at her home only two days after a court rejected her request for the right to die, in a case that has stirred much emotion in France.

The high court in Dijon, eastern France, decided to side with the prosecution which argued that current legislation does not allow the doctor of 52-year-old former schoolteacher Chantal Sebire to prescribe lethal drugs.

In her appeal to the court, Sebire had said she did not want to endure further pain and subject herself to an irreversible worsening of her condition. She asked the court to allow her doctor to help her end her life.

Sebire's body was found at her home in the eastern town of Plombieres-les-Dijon in the Bourgogne region overnight.

The cause of her death was not immediately known, Dijon prosecutor Jean-Pierre Allachi said.

A mother of three, Sebire attracted a strong outpouring of sympathy when she appealed in a television interview last month for the right to "depart peacefully".

Before-and-after pictures of the woman, her face severely deformed, have been featured in the press along with her account of frightened children who ran away at the sight of her.

Sebire learnt in 2002 that she had developed an esthesioneuroblastoma, an uncommon malignant tumour in the nasal cavity, which she said had led to "atrocious" suffering.

"In 2000, I lost the sense of smell and taste... and I lost my sight in October 2007," she said in the television interview.

"One would not allow an animal to go through what I have endured," she said before urging President Nicolas Sarkozy to intervene and grant her request.

Commenting on the case, Justice Minister Rachida Dati said last week that "doctors were not there to prescribe lethal drugs."

Legislation adopted in 2005 allows families to request that life-support equipment for a terminally-ill patient be switched off, but does not allow a doctor to take action to end a patient's life.

Sarkozy asked his chief adviser on health issues to contact Sebire and seek a second opinion on her condition.

Sebire had said she would not appeal the decision rendered Monday and that she would find life-terminating drugs through other means.

"I now know how to get my hands on what I need and if I don't get it in France, I will get it elsewhere," she said.

Only 200 cases of the disease have been recorded worldwide in two decades.

Sebire's death came on the same day as 78-year-old Belgian author Hugo Claus's death by euthanasia while suffering from Alzheimer's disease.

Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg are the only European Unions that currently allow euthanasia.


message 7: by Sophia (last edited Mar 23, 2008 01:56AM) (new)

Sophia (pheephyphophum) | 176 comments Mod
I am actually proud of her. See, how can anything be black and white?? Everything is situational. I never in my life thought I would be happy that someone committed suicide, but I am. And I hope that in her final moments she felt powerful and in control, it would have sucked if she did relinquish that to the state and to her doctors.

What do you guys think about the guy in Belgium?


message 8: by Bliss (new)

Bliss (blissreads) | 9 comments if we don't own our bodies, WTF do we own?

i have a friend in the Netherlands and she said her grandmother was euthanized and that was that.

i guess a DNR on my health care power of attorney is the closest i'll get to assisted suicide in the country.

why is it illegal to assist a person who wants to die swiftly and with dignity yet it's still legal to sell cigarettes, with their death warnings on the label?

maybe there will be a change when our elected officials find a way to profit from euthanasia.


message 9: by Sophia (last edited Mar 26, 2008 12:03AM) (new)

Sophia (pheephyphophum) | 176 comments Mod
LMAO!!! I know right??

Excellent excellent post, chica. I also feel it's important to take care of ourselves so that we don't have to even worry about euthanasia and DNRs. I think that's why I love the raw food stuff so much... We live a long time in America, but are Alzheimer's, colostomy bags and nursing homes really living?


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